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kankan

BBA+LLB TRENT/SWANSEA DUAL DEGREE

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50 members have voted

  1. 1. where will i end up in 10 years?

    • bay street
      2
    • wall street
      1
    • living under gardiner expressway
      47


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Posted (edited)

I want to be a corporate lawyer and work on Bay Street. I'm relying on Ryerson LPP.

Edited by kankan
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37 minutes ago, kankan said:

I want to be a corporate lawyer and work on Bay Street. I'm relying on Ryerson LPP.

It's possible that you can be a corporate lawyer and work on Bay Street, but it's definitely not going to be one you expect it to be. It will most likely be a small firm renting out some office space at one of the buildings on Bay Street. 

While there are top law firms hiring through the LPP,  they are extremely limited (probably one or two firms), competitive, and likely to be given to a candidate with a Canadian JD degree. 

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Do not do this.

Do your BBA at Trent, write the LSAT and study Canadian law at a local law school. The fact that I even had to google "Swansea LLB" before replying to you is telling

You're hoping to land one of the most competitive type of positions right out of law school, an employer that is sorting through hundreds of applications isn't going to stop to google your school

Also I'm pretty sure that UK schools continue into the summer or at least until June, so you won't have an opportunity to apply for summer student positions, which is how the majority of students obtain articles on Bay street. (I just noticed that you actually want to do the LPP rather than article - It seems like you're going about this all the wrong way. Please do more research)

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Sorry, to work on Bay St you’ll have to go to a much more reputable and highly regarded school, like Leicester. 

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, healthlaw said:

Do not do this.

Do your BBA at Trent, write the LSAT and study Canadian law at a local law school. The fact that I even had to google "Swansea LLB" before replying to you is telling

You're hoping to land one of the most competitive type of positions right out of law school, an employer that is sorting through hundreds of applications isn't going to stop to google your school

Also I'm pretty sure that UK schools continue into the summer or at least until June, so you won't have an opportunity to apply for summer student positions, which is how the majority of students obtain articles on Bay street. (I just noticed that you actually want to do the LPP rather than article - It seems like you're going about this all the wrong way. Please do more research)

first option is HBA Ivey + JD after 2 years at trent. if I cannot get into western then i will attend swansea

Edited by kankan

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I swear to God. This is what comes from a generation wannabe lawyers raised on a television show that promotes pretending you went to law school at all as a path into corporate practice. Compared to that, going to some law school overseas that no one has ever heard of must seem like a positively good idea.

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14 minutes ago, Diplock said:

I swear to God. This is what comes from a generation wannabe lawyers raised on a television show that promotes pretending you went to law school at all as a path into corporate practice. Compared to that, going to some law school overseas that no one has ever heard of must seem like a positively good idea.

I'm kind of embarrassed that I had to Google what Swansea even is and I'm pretty sure I'm not pronouncing it correctly. To be fair, geography was never my strong suit.

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3 hours ago, kankan said:

first option is HBA Ivey + JD after 2 years at trent. if I cannot get into western then i will attend swansea

I'd advise you spend sometime on the foreign degree section of the forum and if possible message some of the more active/learned members of this forum. 

You need unbiased information and some guidance. You're making an incredibly expensive decision that may not grant you the opportunities you're hoping for. 

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Just to chime in on foreign law schools and jobs. For context my experience comes from being in the support team at a small-mid sized firm firm that does a lot of work in rural areas. This means the hiring pool isn't nearly as competitive as big law. With that said, I've seen two types of applicants come in. The first is someone who holds a foreign law degree because they lived in the country and wanted to be a lawyer in that country so they got a law degree in that country and practiced as a lawyer in that country. Now they have immigrated to Canada and still want to be a lawyer so they are taking steps for that. This person had a decent chance compared to the applicants that come from domestic law schools but the fact that their experience is in a foreign jurisdiction is definitely a factor in their job prospects. The second is a Canadian citizen who went somewhere else for their law degree and this raises all kinds of red flags to the partners doing the hiring. The general feeling of these applicants is that they couldn't cut it in Canadian law schools and went with an easier path instead of making themselves better applicants. These applicants generally have little chance if even getting an interview unless they have something truly outstanding on their resume. And I do mean truly outstanding not just interesting or unique. This was the situation in looking for lawyers in rural BC, Bay street is significantly more competitive. Do everything you can to get into a Canadian law school, or don't go to law school and consider different career options, there's a ton of other careers that are equal to or better than law

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2 hours ago, Diplock said:

I swear to God. This is what comes from a generation wannabe lawyers raised on a television show that promotes pretending you went to law school at all as a path into corporate practice. Compared to that, going to some law school overseas that no one has ever heard of must seem like a positively good idea.

Ya the arrival of the "Suits" generation into practice over the next few years is going to make things real interesting. 

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Diplock is proudly of the Denny Crane /Alan Shore generation. As am I.

We learned. And they will too.

 

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6 hours ago, shawniebear said:

the "Suits" generation

You mean "The Good Wife" generation? I think we'll be fine. 

Sorry for derailing - carry on.

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As a former inhabitant who lived under the Gardiner Expressway, I will share one bit of wisdom that was passed down to me: Discarded pizza boxes are an inexpensive source of cheese. You don't need an LLB from Swansea to figure that one out!

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8 minutes ago, Demander said:

You mean "The Good Wife" generation? I think we'll be fine. 

Sorry for derailing - carry on.

Yes. Because that's a far better way to imagine the legal profession, prior to entering it.

Seriously. Joking aside, although unrealistic depictions of almost any profession abound in television, I really think it's only bee in the last 10-15 years that this out-sized depiction of "corporate" legal practice has proliferated in television. I'm not saying Matlock was in any way realistic. Perhaps it fueled a generation of unrealistic would-be litigators. But these shows about partnership battles, fighting over clients, lawyers who change their areas of practice more often than they change their shoes ... what the hell is this stuff? Television is always going to be inane. But this is a new flavor of inanity.

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There are more qualified applicants for desirable legal positions than there are desirable positions. You would be putting yourself at a pretty extreme disadvantage coming from a foreign university that nobody has heard of. This is particularly true with respect to Bay Street where every year there are hundreds of students across Canada from domestic schools who are unable to secure a position. 

With the exception of having connections which guarantee you a position upon your return to Canada it's almost never a good idea to go foreign for law school if you want to practice in Canada. 

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17 minutes ago, Diplock said:

Yes. Because that's a far better way to imagine the legal profession, prior to entering it.

Seriously. Joking aside, although unrealistic depictions of almost any profession abound in television, I really think it's only bee in the last 10-15 years that this out-sized depiction of "corporate" legal practice has proliferated in television. I'm not saying Matlock was in any way realistic. Perhaps it fueled a generation of unrealistic would-be litigators. But these shows about partnership battles, fighting over clients, lawyers who change their areas of practice more often than they change their shoes ... what the hell is this stuff? Television is always going to be inane. But this is a new flavor of inanity.

Unsurprisingly, I get asked by laypeople a lot if I watch this show, and when I tell them I got bored after season 2 and quit and it's a highly unrealistic depiction of corporation law and law in general, they get surprised by my comments. Must be an interesting show for others though if it's in its 8th season.  

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Suits isn't really about the practice of law. It's mostly just people in corporate offices exercising very odd ethical decisionmaking, and then occasionally yelling at witnesses without having anything probative to ask. 

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18 hours ago, realpseudonym said:

Suits isn't really about the practice of law. It's mostly just people in corporate offices exercising very odd ethical decisionmaking, and then occasionally yelling at witnesses without having anything probative to ask. 

So basically almost legal dramas and police procedurals.

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..... and another thing about suits.

What law firm of any size anywhere can close a deal with the parties all signing exactly one (1) single paged document?  that comes in a little blue folder?

I have done so in the past - but every law firm over 5 people thinks that you haven't really signed anything unless the photocopy bill is AT LEAST triple digits.

...sorry- had some time off so I watched some of the first season, but kinda lost interest.

...NOW GIT OFF A MY LAWN.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Ryn said:

So basically almost legal dramas and police procedurals.

In fairness, the Good Wife involved less shouting at witnesses, and more dramatic plot twists stemming from last minute discoveries by the investigator, which, for some reason, were allowed into evidence despite amounting to a persistent strategy of trial-by-ambush. 

(Edit: my-exes have told me that I'm a lot of fun to watch TV with /s)

Edited by realpseudonym
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