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lawstories

Life in Kamloops? Profs at TRU?

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Hello all,

How is it like living in Kamloops? For those who moved from urban areas, what is the adjustment like? Is it a diverse campus/place?

Also, how are the law professors at TRU?

Thanks!

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5 hours ago, lawstories said:

How is it like living in Kamloops? For those who moved from urban areas, what is the adjustment like? Is it a diverse campus/place?

Also, how are the law professors at TRU?

I'm from Surrey, went to UBC Vancouver for my undergrad. Kamloops is small both in population and geography - especially compared to Greater Vancouver. But there's a lot to do and lots of great cafes, bars, and restaurants. Law school keeps you so busy that you probably won't have time to see all that Kamloops has to offer before you graduate. The only thing I think Kamloops is lacking is clothing stores - the mall isn't great and downtown only has one or two viable options (at least for men's clothes).

The school is pretty diverse. In the law school alone we have the Indigenous Law Students Association, the South Asian Law Students Association, the Black Law Students Association, and others. 

Every school has good and bad professors, I've had a primarily positive experience with the professors here at TRU. "Bad" professors in this context means profs that aren't necessarily the best teachers, I've never heard of a professor being malicious, and the administration does everything it can to correct grades where it's found that a student was treated unfairly. 

The profs here have written textbooks, legislation, law journals, etc. They're all really invested in the success of the students. One thing that stands out about TRU Law is that we have a number of sessional professors who are practicing lawyers that the school flies into Kamloops on a weekly basis to teach courses (fly in Thursday morning, teach two classes, fly out Thursday night). These sessional profs are generally leading experts in their respective areas of law in downtown Vancouver - they teach based on their extensive experience and can be EXCELLENT references for you if you do well in their courses.

4 hours ago, mapleleaf94 said:

Just piggy backing off this how are most of the courses advertised actually offered?

In first year you don't get to choose your courses. Everyone takes Contracts, Constitutional, Property, Torts, Criminal from September to April. From September to December you also take "Legislation, Administration, and Policy," and from January to April you take Legal Perspectives. On top of all of that, you take a pass/fail course from September to March called Fundamental Legal Skills.

You get to choose your courses for 2nd and 3rd year. Certain courses are offered consistently (ie, family law, trusts, wills and estates, tax law, etc.). Other specialty courses are offered on a rotating basis (one year on, one year off - ie, Video Game Law, Digital Media Law, Sports Law, etc.).

3 credit courses are 3 hours per week - either as a single 3 hour block or as two 1.5 hour classes. 

Administration tries its best to balance the available courses in each semester so that each semester has a fair number of "black letter" courses and "fun" courses like Video Game Law. But in the end it's subject to the availability of sessional professors and other factors.

Edited by canuckfanatic
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I had primarily lived in big cities (Vancouver, Toronto) before moving to Kamloops, but really enjoyed my time there.  I'm a city boy at heart and wouldn't have wanted to stay there long term, but I absolutely loved my 3 years there. 

It was a great place to be a student and unlike some of the law schools in the bigger cities, the vast majority of students were not Kamloops natives which I thought helped form stronger bonds between classmates as almost none of us knew anyone else in the city.

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52 minutes ago, Stark said:

I had primarily lived in big cities (Vancouver, Toronto) before moving to Kamloops, but really enjoyed my time there.  I'm a city boy at heart and wouldn't have wanted to stay there long term, but I absolutely loved my 3 years there. 

It was a great place to be a student and unlike some of the law schools in the bigger cities, the vast majority of students were not Kamloops natives which I thought helped form stronger bonds between classmates as almost none of us knew anyone else in the city.

That is great to hear. Thank you!

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Kamloops is actually pretty big land wise and it is pretty spread out.

It really depends who you are as a person and what you like doing on your spare time.  There was pickup hockey ran by the city Mon-Friday 11-1 for $5.00 so if you like that then you are set.  The bar scene isnt bad for the size of the city and there are all different types of bars (Irish, club, lounges - not really sports bar when I was there I guess there might be one now).  The Blazers games are cheap and fun.  

The gym scene is decent and there is a lot of golf, skiing, snow boarding, hiking and biking.

I agree with the poster above and the mall really sucks so dont count on buying clothes and suits in Kamloops.  The movie theater is bigger than my hometown but smaller than most major cities.

The amount of free time you have is totally up to you, I didnt go to a lot of classes by 3L and did fine so I had a lot of free time but I had less in 1L because I went to much more of the classes.

If you dont like Kamloops Vancouver really isnt that far like 3-4 Hours and Calgary is closer to 7-8.

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2 hours ago, Bure10 said:

Kamloops is actually pretty big land wise and it is pretty spread out.

It really depends who you are as a person and what you like doing on your spare time.  There was pickup hockey ran by the city Mon-Friday 11-1 for $5.00 so if you like that then you are set.  The bar scene isnt bad for the size of the city and there are all different types of bars (Irish, club, lounges - not really sports bar when I was there I guess there might be one now).  The Blazers games are cheap and fun.  

The gym scene is decent and there is a lot of golf, skiing, snow boarding, hiking and biking.

I agree with the poster above and the mall really sucks so dont count on buying clothes and suits in Kamloops.  The movie theater is bigger than my hometown but smaller than most major cities.

The amount of free time you have is totally up to you, I didnt go to a lot of classes by 3L and did fine so I had a lot of free time but I had less in 1L because I went to much more of the classes.

If you dont like Kamloops Vancouver really isnt that far like 3-4 Hours and Calgary is closer to 7-8.

Thanks for this! 

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Just my .02: Kamloops is no prize. If you come from somewhere especially lacking (I'm looking at you Brandon, MB, Regina, SK) then Kamloops might be ok. Not the best, but certainly in the same league as those places. But if you come from somewhere with even modest amenities (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Winnipeg, etc), Kamloops might suck. It depends what you're into, but I don't love Kamloops. Its like a poor, ugly Kelowna without the lake.

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1 hour ago, Brookvale said:

Just my .02: Kamloops is no prize. If you come from somewhere especially lacking (I'm looking at you Brandon, MB, Regina, SK) then Kamloops might be ok. Not the best, but certainly in the same league as those places. But if you come from somewhere with even modest amenities (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Winnipeg, etc), Kamloops might suck. It depends what you're into, but I don't love Kamloops. Its like a poor, ugly Kelowna without the lake.

I can't believe my hometown got brought up just to get hated on...

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I've lived in Kamloops for 5 yrs and I love some aspects and hate others. I moved here specifically to ride mountain bikes so I'm fairly biased because it's up there with the best 

 

Pros: 

- The options for outdoor activities can't be beat. You can walk out your door more or less anywhere in town and be in a park/'green' space within minutes.

- Fibreoptic internet if you're in to that sort of thing

- 90% of the profs I had for my undergrad were excellent

- I personally love the 'western' feel you get from the sagebrush, ponderosa pine, and rolling hills but others will miss the colour green.

 

 

Cons:

-There's only three ways to get around town and all of them are going to be under construction for the next 3 years

- There's insane levels of vagrants. If you want your downtown riddled with needles and human feces, Kamloops is a great place for you. The population is only going up as more and more services are put in place, and annual fires drive more people to Kamloops as a central hub

- Every summer you can't go outside for 4-6 weeks because it's too smoky

-  If you like 'the finer things' we don't have that. If you like ATVs, Motocross, guns, casual racism and camouflage then you'll love the local culture

- The Kamloops housing/rent market is going insane. If you're coming from Vancouver or downtown Toronto it may still seem reasonable but compared to what a town of its size should be, it's getting really steep. 

 

Somewhat of a rant, but I do like living here overall as a whole, or I would have moved elsewhere. But seriously, if I didn't highly prioritize outdoor activities I'd have gone a while ago.

 

 

Hope that doesn't turn anyone off. Haha. 

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