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thesizzlingwok

UofS vs. UofC

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So I was hesitant to make this because there's been other threads including Sask and Calgary but I couldn't help myself.

I'm an favourable position so there's really no downsides here but I just don't know what to do and how much weight to give to decisive factors. I was accepted to home school early January (UofS) and I got accepted last week to the school I thought I'd love to go to - Calgary. I'm from Sask and I am happy here, but this is my 4th year of uni straight out of highschool, my parents have been retired since I've been like 16 and I've been living at home my whole life. I love my parents to death and we're genuinely really close, and I recognize how much of a privilege it is to live at home and have my meals cooked for me and my laundry done, and even get a ride to school if you're in a bind for time etc. So while I could stay here and maintain my great support system - thus giving me my best opportunity to get exceptional grades throughout law - I can't help but feel like this might be my chance to step out and grow up as my own independent person.

When I was prepping for my November 2018 LSAT and doing all my applications I thought UofC was my "dream" school, I have good friends in Calgary so I wouldn't be a complete stranger at all, I spend a week or two in Calgary a year and I'm comfortable there. That was honestly one of my big motivators during September-November was the thinking "work hard and you can get out of here". I thought it was my dream school to step out of Sask and do some growing up, but now I'm not quite sure how smart that is anymore. I say that because my goals for law school are solely professional. I really enjoyed undergrad (it was shitty at times, like all things) but my goals were always to pursue law to go into practice. Honestly, I cannot wait to start working.

My concern is if I was to accept Calgary I may find myself so overwhelmed with all these newfound responsibilities that I would have that I'm just simply not used to - I'm not incapable of doing them, but I'm used to being able to focus my energy on school and EC's. I'm worried that these responsibilities and this very large change to living on my own will really take a shot at my grades, and naturally switching from undergrad in social sciences to law will carry some changes to it regardless - living on my own in Calgary or staying in Sask. My other concern is EC's. My grades weren't what got me into UofS early or UofC pretty early, it was definitely my EC's because my grades/score weren't anything exceptional (CGPA 3.3, L2 3.53, 160). The last six years going back to 10th grade I've been working with some great NPO's and through this work I've made some truly fantastic connections as I move into law, and going to Calgary I'd have to stop a couple of them. Like getting into law school, getting top tier jobs isn't just grades - but it is a lot of it. With my sights set on going straight into practice shooting for a top tier firm, I feel like I'm almost crazy for going to Calgary and losing my connections in Sask and starting fresh there for the next couple years, when I could stay here, live at home, keep working hard and focusing solely on school, and keep kindling these connections (not to mention I genuinely get a lot of satisfaction out of this volunteer work, not just a resume building block). But, in the back of my mind, a little voice is telling me to step out into the world and be my own adult a bit even if it means "sacrificing" some of these things - as if there'll be an equivalent payoff for moving away. 

P.S. I'm interested in working in either Sask or Calgary, and there's reasonable movement between the two cities and markets so I'm not super super worried about job prospects just yet. 

Any thoughts and opinions are appreciated. Did anyone regret staying home? Regret moving away?

Edited by thesizzlingwok

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Let me get this straight... You want to become a lawyer but you're concerned that the newfound responsibilities that come from ensuring your wellbeing will be "overwhelming"? Jeez...  If you are staying at home to limit the cost of going to school, that's understandable. But if you're staying at home because you're scared that it will be too much to feed yourself, pay your bills, and study, then I think the practice of law (and all the responsibilities that come with it) will definitely be too much to handle. You're an adult and you are obviously a capable student. You can rise to the challenge. You will be just fine, I promise. 

In fact, just a brief story to illustrate that: I moved out at 16 and spent my entire senior year of high school living in Calgary, over 300km away from my parents. I worked almost 40 hours a week while attending high school. Today, nine years later, I'm going to law school. Trust me when I say you can do it. 

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Wherever you go to school, you need to learn to live on your own and cook and clean for yourself. It’s time. In a few years’ time, you will be responsible for other peoples’ money/assets/businesses/reputations/children/liberty. Move out now and start practicing taking care of yourself -  it is not that hard. If you think it will be hard during law school, it will be harder during articling or early in practice - so are you never going to move out? If you get into a serious relationship, don’t you want some experience running a household first? Top tier firms like go-getters to be working for them. 

Also, you’re saying you lived at home with everything done for you and your grades, LSAT etc still weren’t the greatest? So was there really even that much of a benefit from living at home? 

Edited by providence
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15 minutes ago, Brookvale said:

Let me get this straight... You want to become a lawyer but you're concerned that the newfound responsibilities that come from ensuring your wellbeing will be "overwhelming"? Jeez...  If you are staying at home to limit the cost of going to school, that's understandable. But if you're staying at home because you're scared that it will be too much to feed yourself, pay your bills, and study, then I think the practice of law (and all the responsibilities that come with it) will definitely be too much to handle. You're an adult and you are obviously a capable student. You can rise to the challenge. You will be just fine, I promise. 

In fact, just a brief story to illustrate that: I moved out at 16 and spent my entire senior year of high school living in Calgary, over 300km away from my parents. I worked almost 40 hours a week while attending high school. Today, nine years later, I'm going to law school. Trust me when I say you can do it. 

Well I'm absolutely positive I'm capable of doing it, I'm talking about maximizing my success to do the best of my abilities. Yes it is a change from what I'm used to and I'm sure I can rise to the challenge, but I want to do as well as I can obviously to open as many doors as I can for myself when it's time to look for articles. 

I do admire your story too by the way - that is a lot for a 16-year-old to take on and it sounds like it all worked out for you! I'm not a stranger to hard work either, I've worked ~40 hours a week through uni and work on multiple boards while taking a full load (I know this was done while living at home which is different and definitely lesser). I'm not so much worried about whether I can do it or not, I know I can, but when I'm still hustling for the next three years trying to get the best damn grades I can is it a fight to willingly take on? Come articles and work I know I can do it because that's where my energy will be focused - on work and home.

Edited by thesizzlingwok

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6 minutes ago, thesizzlingwok said:

Well I'm absolutely positive I'm capable of doing it, I'm talking about maximizing my success to do the best of my abilities. Yes it is a change from what I'm used to and I'm sure I can rise to the challenge, but I want to do as well as I can obviously to open as many doors as I can for myself when it's time to look for articles. 

This is the perfect example of why being a K-JD does a disservice to some people. If you are not used to doing for yourself, which you really should have learned in undergrad, it would have been better to take a year or two off and figure it out before going to law school. 

Getting a good articling position is not just about grades. They are very important, but so is your personality and your interests. Being too scared to leave home doesn’t signify the type of motivation and character that will push you the extra inches over the line in an interview. And you won’t get the most out of your law school experience living at home. When I was in law school, people made fun of the K-JDs who still lived at home and had mommy making their lunch and doing their laundry. 

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Is cost a factor? Renting your own place while you're not working (or working part-time) for three years could mean a lot of debt.

If not, I would tend to agree with the others and go with Calgary. You already have a support system there, so it's not like you're entirely on your own.

Also, maybe you could move a month or two earlier to work out a routine when living on your own. 

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I was a K-JD student and moved away for law school. It was definitely an adjustment living on my own for the first time, but I think it's a very important step that's better done earlier rather than later. I found it to be part of the adventure and was all the better for it, especially when I later went on exchange. 

On the flip side, saving money and reducing debt by living at home is a huge benefit. I didn't have this option, but I certainly wouldn't knock anyone living at home for this reason. I guess I'd say that staying at home simply because of the comfort factor (ie. excluding financial considerations) may be doing yourself a disservice down the road. At some point,  you are going to have to balance the responsibilities of a demanding field with independent living. I personally would rather learn to do that during law school than during articles or associateship.

 

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Even if you do live at home to save money, you should still take care of your own laundry, cooking, shopping, bills (phone or whatever) and so on, and contribute to the family on those things. You should be helping your parents by shoveling snow, doing small repairs around the house and the like. And they should not be driving you to school.

Edited by providence
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2 minutes ago, providence said:

Even if you do live at home to save money, you should still take care of your own laundry, cooking, shopping, bills (phone or whatever) and so on, and contribute to the family on those things. You should be helping your parents by shoveling snow, doing small repairs around the house and the like. And they should not be driving you to school.

Totally agree with this. At 22, you should be independent even if you live at home.

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You're looking at this all wrong. Learning how to cook, clean, pay bills, etc, is not something that will take away from your ability to succeed at school. It will add to it. Being a more responsible adult and being accountable for your actions will be reflected in your academics. Some of these properties will be more direct ("I can't go to a bar and drink like a shithead tonight, I need to get groceries") others will be more subtle (developing discipline and responsibility).

Further, I'm not sure who you're talking to, but law school will not consume your life. At all. If it does, you're studying hard and not smart. You'll have plenty of time to do all the necessary tasks that come with being an adult. I'm articling right now and I manage to bathe AND dress myself every day! It's not so fucking hard to get the best grades and take care of yourself and your responsibilities.

Pro-tip: every medalist at my school didn't spend their nights in the library. They had social lives, jobs, etc. I don't think any of them had the lifestyle of a veal.

Note: This advice goes for both U of C and Sask.

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Okay, so lets put aside the "would it be too hard to live on your own".  It's not really.  It would be an adjustment, but nothing life-altering.

Lets go back to basics - do you want to move away from (Saskatoon?) to Calgary, or do you want to stay?  Both are perfectly valid choices, but it's up to you to make that decision.  Because if you go to U of C it will be much easier for you to get a job in Calgary.  If you go to U of S it will be much easier to stay in Saskatchewan.

Then make your decison from there.

 

Anecdotally, I didn't move out of my parents house for good until third year of law school.  I did however do a co-op work term for six months out of town which was a good "growing up" kind of experience.  The dynamic was different when I came back and went to law school while living at home.  If the OP still feels very dependent on their parents I would suggest they take steps now to become more independent, whether or not they still live with their parents.

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Consider getting your own apartment in Sask if cost isn't a factor. Can always go home as much as you'd like if it's overwhelming. Just a thought

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On 3/14/2019 at 1:59 PM, Malicious Prosecutor said:

Okay, so lets put aside the "would it be too hard to live on your own".  It's not really.  It would be an adjustment, but nothing life-altering.

Lets go back to basics - do you want to move away from (Saskatoon?) to Calgary, or do you want to stay?  Both are perfectly valid choices, but it's up to you to make that decision.  Because if you go to U of C it will be much easier for you to get a job in Calgary.  If you go to U of S it will be much easier to stay in Saskatchewan.

Then make your decison from there.

 

Anecdotally, I didn't move out of my parents house for good until third year of law school.  I did however do a co-op work term for six months out of town which was a good "growing up" kind of experience.  The dynamic was different when I came back and went to law school while living at home.  If the OP still feels very dependent on their parents I would suggest they take steps now to become more independent, whether or not they still live with their parents.

To be completely honest I'm not wholeheartedly committed to working in one market versus the other. I enjoy both those cities and my experiences in both of them has been fantastic, I loved growing up in Sask and I feel no inclination to run for the hills. You're right, by default it will be easier to land a job where I go to school. Being that I'm not completely sold on working in Calgary I feel inclined to stay in Sask because I do a good bit of non-profit work and it's teaching me some great stuff, I'm meeting some fantastic people, and I frankly really enjoy it - also as time goes on with these groups I'm taking on bigger roles and learning more. Going to Calgary would mean for the most part I walk away from these opportunities and I'm back to square one, not that the work I did in Sask was time wasted at all but it would mean I'm finding my way again getting involved a new place, and as a perfectionist I love seeing things through to the end. I considered getting really involved in the school there as an alternative, but I think I'd love the opportunity to do both - which I could do at UofS. 

As to your anecdote, I'm really looking forward to a term abroad during law no matter what school I go to and I think that'll be a fantastic experience, much like your co-op experience. 

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On 3/14/2019 at 1:57 PM, setto said:

You're looking at this all wrong. Learning how to cook, clean, pay bills, etc, is not something that will take away from your ability to succeed at school. It will add to it. Being a more responsible adult and being accountable for your actions will be reflected in your academics. Some of these properties will be more direct ("I can't go to a bar and drink like a shithead tonight, I need to get groceries") others will be more subtle (developing discipline and responsibility).

I really appreciate the angle you look at this from, hadn't thought of it that way! 

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