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I am just wondering if anyone has ever gotten in with a 151 at U of C? 

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I am just guessing, but probably not. The difference between a 151 and a 161 (their average successful LSAT score) is huge. Its a jump from the 48th percentile of test takers to the 82nd percentile. I would assume that even with exceptional EC's (like you spent time as a UN delegate for a European country) and perfect grades, it might still be a long shot. If that is you, then spend time studying for the LSAT and add some point to that. See if you can push it even as high as 158.

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Posted (edited)

I think Brookvale is entirely right but I would qualify it with the following.

(1) UofC is holistic in its admissions process. On top of your LSAT score and transcripts, UofC requires you to get two references and write a statement of interest as well. You also have the option to write a "special facts" section and they have an Indigenous admissions review process as well. A low score can be offset with these other factors.

BUT (2) they may impose a minimum LSAT or GPA requirement any given year. So there is also a good chance that a 151 is below the threshold to even be considered.

In summary, for the average person (and you're probably more average then you think) a 151 means its time to go back to the books and practice tests. Chances are good you can do better and just need to study more. 

Edited by ImposterSyndrome

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22 hours ago, ImposterSyndrome said:

I think Brookvale is entirely right but I would qualify it with the following.

(1) UofC is holistic in its admissions process. On top of your LSAT score and transcripts, UofC requires you to get two references and write a statement of interest as well. You also have the option to write a "special facts" section and they have an Indigenous admissions review process as well. A low score can be offset with these other factors.

BUT (2) they may impose a minimum LSAT or GPA requirement any given year. So there is also a good chance that a 151 is below the threshold to even be considered.

In summary, for the average person (and you're probably more average then you think) a 151 means its time to go back to the books and practice tests. Chances are good you can do better and just need to study more. 

You're right, the second time I took the lsat I studied for 31 days, fully 

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