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Hello!  This is a great forum and resource.  I am a 48 year old stay at home parent of three kids.  I have been out of the work force for 15 years and graduated university in 1994.  I did well in school and graduated with a 3.8 but my brain feels very rusty now.  It has been a dream of mine to go to law school and I've decided to give try and am looking for any advice or words of wisdom??  I have been using the Khan Academy program to study for the LSAT but would prefer a tutor in the Vancouver area.  Thoughts? advice? Am I crazy at this age??

Edited by Howard
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Posted (edited)

As far as I can tell, 7Sage is pretty well-respected. It's been years since I've dealt with the LSAT, but at one point I did take the Powerscore course in Vancouver and was happy with the instruction I received (if you're inclined towards a course).

Edited by spicyfoodftw
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I don't really have any advice, just wanted to say good luck and don't worry about the rust! Studying for the LSAT will shake that off pretty fast, as an applicant only a few years younger than you I know how difficult all this can be. Stay strong and focused, you can do it!!

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Posted (edited)

Hi Howard!

I’m in my mid thirties and, like you, am a stay at home parent of three kids. I wrote the November LSAT and scored a 163.

I started studying in mid-September  I used Khan Academy to drill the whole time  and watched the 7Sage Logic game breakdown videos - the daily “check in” nature of Khan is great for motivating you to come back every day, which can really help when you’re busy with the kids and tempted to just skip a day! 

I borrowed the LG Bible, Manhattan RC book, and a set of official PTs from my local library. Did the Bible cover to cover but only got to about half the RC book. My interlibrary loan for the LR Bible wasn’t going to come through in time so I bought a 2016 copy off Kijiji along with another book of 10 PTs for $40 and did that Bible cover to cover as well. It probably helped that I actually kind of enjoyed the LSAT, though I know that’s not the case for everyone ;)

My pre -study diagnostic was a 159. The week before I wrote, I was averaging 169, but my studying was complicated by an unexpected surgery that took me out of my LSAT bubble entirely for about two weeks. I think if I were to study more I could get to the 170’s, but time being what it is, I’ve applied with my score and crossed fingers. 

The most important thing is to commit to the studying and do something LSAT related every day, even if it’s just one section. Set aside the time you need and make yourself the priority. But I also I couldn’t have done it without my family’s support and understanding.

I have young kids so my spouse was amazing with taking them out of the house during set times for me to study. I also had a good string of evening library study sessions going until my local library shut down. 

My kids also saw a few more movies during those weeks than they might normally have watched, but they were content and I was able to get the work done that I needed to do - in the end it will benefit us all, I hope!

Best of luck to you and everyone else here choosing to take on this challenge with kids underfoot. It’s no walk in the park, but you absolutely can do it!

Edited by StayAtHomeLSAT
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48 minutes ago, Howard said:

Hello!  This is a great forum and resource.  I am a 48 year old stay at home parent of three kids.  I have been out of the work force for 15 years and graduated university in 1994.  I did well in school and graduated with a 3.8 but my brain feels very rusty now.  It has been a dream of mine to go to law school and I've decided to give try and am looking for any advice or words of wisdom??  I have been using the Khan Academy program to study for the LSAT but would prefer a tutor in the Vancouver area.  Thoughts? advice? Am I crazy at this age??

You're certainly not crazy!

Look, in some ways I won't mince words.  There's not going to be a lot of people your age in your law school class.  If you're lucky there might be one or two - but that does mean people in middle age+ do go to law school!  I remember I tutored one woman in Con law who was 20+ years older than I was.

The one caution I might have is it's April now.  You're looking at a 2020 start date, and wouldn't be called until 2024, at which point you'll be 53?  If you have money then by all means go for it, but I don't know what kind of return on investment you'll get if you have to borrow to cover tuition.  Junior lawyers (which you'll be) aren't always very well paid to start out.

But your brain might be feeling rusty now, but I bet you'll probably be feeling re-invigorated after trying to keep up with all those 20-somethings in class.

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There's a 1st year law student at my school who is older than you and he's doing great. I've also met a lawyer at a large firm in Vancouver who didn't become a lawyer until he was in his 50s. There's something to be said about bringing life experience to the classroom that most of us 20-something students don't have.

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I have had two classmates around your age.

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I'm 21 and one of my buddy's dads who'd be 55-60 decided to go back and do law! Kinda funny seeing him at school but its very possible, not super uncommon, and applaud your drive to not let your vintage impede your dreams! 

As for LSAT studying, I did the Powerscore books and honestly - didn't love it. I say this specifically because they were pricey and I was working fulltime and a fulltime student in five classes while studying and the way the books are split up make lessons take at least an hour. So I couldn't get much studying done here and there and I had to wait for a block of time to study. I wrote this November (my only sitting) and did the 7Sage online course during my four classes this fall amidst sending in six applications. The 7Sage course was the absolute best. If you're as computer savvy as you are book savvy you can use it and the analytic services the course has is awesome and ensures you spend time studying the things you're bad at. So in terms of studying its broken up into sections and videos with lessons and worksheets interspersed. If you got ten minutes to kill you can do a lesson. So I could study around my classes and schedule so it helped to stick with it. The videos were great, the instructor JY is funny and makes it interesting (and the Powerscore books were soooo dry) so it made studying enjoyable honestly. You write practice tests and enter it into the answer sheet on 7Sage and it provides analytics and shows your trends based on section and question type. This is broken down into importance - question types you never get right and are historically the most frequent on the LSAT will become prioritized. The analytics ensured I spent my time studying my weak-points so I could use my time well. Would definitely recommend. Most importantly, it is very competitive in terms of cost, I did three month subscription and I think it was 180 Canadian?? Definitely a course to check out! Best of luck!

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Thanks for all the responses.  Fortunately, finances and the cost of law school don't factor too much into the equation at this stage in my life; however, I really appreciate the honesty.  I am doing this because it's always been a dream and my husband's demanding job, as well as having three young children always made the dream seem untenable until now.  I have started the 7sage program and it has been the most helpful so far.  I was using the Khan Academy program but it does have limits.  I am hoping to perhaps work in the Crown Counsel office.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/8/2019 at 1:46 PM, Howard said:

Hello!  This is a great forum and resource.  I am a 48 year old stay at home parent of three kids.  I have been out of the work force for 15 years and graduated university in 1994.  I did well in school and graduated with a 3.8 but my brain feels very rusty now.  It has been a dream of mine to go to law school and I've decided to give try and am looking for any advice or words of wisdom??  I have been using the Khan Academy program to study for the LSAT but would prefer a tutor in the Vancouver area.  Thoughts? advice? Am I crazy at this age??

In my class in law school was a retired cop that was 51 years old in 1L. He was in better shape than any of us, his work ethic put all of us to shame, and he was an all around awesome guy. He was able to leverage his life experiences and get a very lucrative criminal defense job at a good firm fairly quick. I also had at least another 2 classmates in my year that were in their early 40s as well, and I believe they did just fine too.

You'll definitely have some unique challenges due to your peers being half your age, but I don't think its the end of the world.

Especially if the financial proposition isn't an issue, I say go for it. I would kill to go through law school again - I loved it.

Regarding preparing for the LSAT, there's a lot of tools/courses out there, but my approach was one of self study and brute force. I kept doing practice tests until my score was consistently in the range I wanted it to be. This took about 2 months of doing tests 3x a week under timed conditions. Its what worked for me, but largely because I was cheap and didn't want to spend money so your mileage may vary. Good luck!

 

Edited by Chuckles64

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On 3/28/2019 at 10:15 PM, Howard said:

Thanks for all the responses.  Fortunately, finances and the cost of law school don't factor too much into the equation at this stage in my life; however, I really appreciate the honesty.  I am doing this because it's always been a dream and my husband's demanding job, as well as having three young children always made the dream seem untenable until now.  I have started the 7sage program and it has been the most helpful so far.  I was using the Khan Academy program but it does have limits.  I am hoping to perhaps work in the Crown Counsel office.

I am in the same situation as you - just curious, what is your background? Fingers crossed for both of us

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I have no extra advice, but it might be encouraging for you to know that I started law school at age 40 after being a stay-at-home mom to my three kids for 8 years. My brain was very, very rusty. It all worked out. I'm 44 now and I'm working at my actual, literal dream job as a lawyer. I survived law school and so did my kids.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/8/2019 at 4:46 PM, Howard said:

Hello!  This is a great forum and resource.  I am a 48 year old stay at home parent of three kids.  I have been out of the work force for 15 years and graduated university in 1994.  I did well in school and graduated with a 3.8 but my brain feels very rusty now.  It has been a dream of mine to go to law school and I've decided to give try and am looking for any advice or words of wisdom??  I have been using the Khan Academy program to study for the LSAT but would prefer a tutor in the Vancouver area.  Thoughts? advice? Am I crazy at this age??

Hey Howard! 

That is AWESOME! You are not crazy! If anything I feel old, I am 26 and burnt out. Law schools would be so lucky to have someone like you. People who succeed are the ones who generally have life experience and I really think you can thrive. It is never too late to make a change, you can even pursue law part-time while raising your family. Do not give up and I think coming to this forum was the best first step. I avoided forums during my prep and now that I am waiting to hear back from schools I find it so supportive and comforting. 

Here are my tips: 

1) Khan Academy was a great prep, it was fun and engaging. Most importantly it will prep you well because the new format of the LSAT will be online. 

2)  I used 7Sage Videos on Youtube to master logic games..

3) Another trick that saved me because I didn't study for my second LSAT but jumped 23 percentiles, from the sheer fact that I rented library books. Go check out books from different prep companies, I found in the end I copied the methods from Khan academy with some tricks from the other books. Pick old books from the early 90's too. People made fun of me for doing that but it paid off for a few questions on the real LSAT which I immediately recognized because I referenced old materials. 

I essentially made a hybrid of my own method towards solving questions this way, that worked with every type of question. 

4) Save your LSATs, you dont want to waste them! 

5) Look at the law schools near you and see if they offer an Access to Learning and Law program. Since you are a mature student you have a high chance of being accepted and they essentially pay for your LSAT prep. Obviously, it might not be the greatest, I did mine at Osgoode, but the point is it made me familiar with the material. It was a nice introduction that put me in a good position to self-study. 

6) Buy your LSAT clock now and practice with that. I don't know if the new timers will be digitial but what I did was buy a "nurses watch" from amazon. https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00GHG413S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

If you look at that clock you will see that the seconds are shown really clearly, it was a perfect size and required practice to get used to. 

Edited by Alchi

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21 hours ago, krumb said:

I have no extra advice, but it might be encouraging for you to know that I started law school at age 40 after being a stay-at-home mom to my three kids for 8 years. My brain was very, very rusty. It all worked out. I'm 44 now and I'm working at my actual, literal dream job as a lawyer. I survived law school and so did my kids.

That sounds amazing, thanks for sharing! 

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