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Yabbie

Has TRU gotten more competitive over the last few years?

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Posted (edited)

Seems like the TRU board is pretty active-more so than Lasking or UNB and same as Sask and UofM. TRU used to be a more accessible law school, is this still the case?

 

 

 

Edited by Yabbie

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If by more accessible you mean is it holistic, then yes they still use a holistic approach to admissions just like many other schools. 

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TRU still uses the same holistic approach to admissions. At the same time, it has gotten more competitive. This is because more and more people are applying to TRU each year, and more and more people are choosing TRU over other schools. There is less waitlist movement this year than last year, and there has been a significant increase in applications. Since the number of seats available hasn't changed, more applications = more competitive.

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On 3/7/2019 at 4:15 PM, Yabbie said:

Would you say that in terms of competitiveness, TRU is on par with Calgary/Sask/Windsor? 

 

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Yabbie said:

 

Are you a BC Resident and do you plan on working in BC? 

Just based off of friends who have graduated and landed jobs, my understandings is if you are planning to stay and work in BC it is better to attend a law school in BC and vice versa with the other provinces. This is just one perspective though! 

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On 3/7/2019 at 6:15 PM, Yabbie said:

Seems like the TRU board is pretty active-more so than Lasking or UNB

What do you mean by this? What is "the TRU board"?

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14 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

What do you mean by this? What is "the TRU board"?

I assume OP means the TRU section of this website.

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, clevermoose said:

I assume OP means the TRU section of this website.

Gotcha. I'm also not sure what they mean by accessible, but on the various definitions of the word I'm not sure this site is a good barometer. I know people in the application process that don't even know this site exists. 

I'm not sure TRU having more posts than UNB (or more activity) on this site says much about either school... Especially in terms of competitiveness. 

Edited by IrishStew

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Im asking wether TRU has become more competitive in recent years? It was considered the law school with the least competitive standards a couple years ago. Is this still the case? From other posts it seems like applications have gone up dramatically. By more accessible, I was trying to be polite. Is perceived as the "4th Tier Law School"(https://lawiscool.com/2009/02/17/canadas-first-fourth-tier-law-school/) or it TRU neck and neck with "established" schools in terms of selectivity?

Edited by Yabbie

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19 minutes ago, Yabbie said:

Im asking wether TRU has become more competitive in recent years? It was considered the law school with the least competitive standards a couple years ago. Is this still the case? From other posts it seems like applications have gone up dramatically. By more accessible, I was trying to be polite. Is perceived as the "4th Tier Law School"(https://lawiscool.com/2009/02/17/canadas-first-fourth-tier-law-school/) or it TRU neck and neck with "established" schools in terms of selectivity?

Just read this article for the first time. Did not know they were considering opening up a law faculty at Simon Fraser University instead. That would have been a smart move and a lot more convenient for me haha. 

In regards to what you are asking, I think TRU has definitely become more competitive over the years. This article was written in 2009. Over the years, the "stigma" of attending what is deemed as a fourth tier law school in Canada beats going abroad (for many, not all). Therefore, TRU has become a more popular choice for students wanting to stay within Canada. Also, I heard job prospects are better for anyone staying in Canada if they are wanting to practise in Canada. I have worked at two law firms during my undergrad and both firms had hired articling students/and or lawyers who graduated from TRU. 

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I think TRU is still considered one of the weaker law schools in Canada, and I personally wouldn't go there just because the tuition is so much higher than other schools that are about the same level in terms of job prospects and have better reputations. I think TRU is getting a better reputation over the years, but you're still going to have those old school lawyers who are partners at big firms who have never heard of it or have bad thoughts about the school in general because it doesn't have the same legacy as other schools. 

With that said - no school in Canada is "weak" and it's better to go to TRU than abroad for whatever your goal is. As more students start joining the workforce and moving their way up to partner level and positions of influence then the school with a) have better connections for employment and b) increase their reputation. It seems they've put a lot of investment in their program. 

This is the first time I've read the article that you posted and I agree. I would way rather go to Simon Fraser if they had a law school than TRU. I think Ryerson will eventually have a law school in Toronto as well, and at first it'll probably be easy to get into and not have a great rep, but it'll follow a similar pattern to TRU, especially because students want to be in Toronto versus other smaller markets in Ontario in my opinion. You have the advantage of having coffees in Toronto with partners of law firms rather than having to book a train from Kingston or London and really wasting a whole day to meet a few people. 

This is a personal point for me too, but as I get older I don't really want to "slum it out" in a city that I don't want to live in in the future. Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver, Montreal and maybe Halifax are probably the markets I want to be in in terms of starting my life as a lawyer.... Just some thoughts

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Anecdotally, I've met a few TRU grads in Vancouver and they seem to be doing fine. I suspect any difficulty TRU grads face in getting articling jobs in Vancouver has more to do with the saturation of the market than their school. However, were I in a position to attend, I'd have issues with the tuition because it is, from my understanding, quite high relative to many other schools. 

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2 hours ago, IrishStew said:

I think TRU is still considered one of the weaker law schools in Canada

The people that say that are generally law student hopefuls that have nothing to base that opinion on other than outdated news articles from before there where any TRU grads to judge. TRU students hold their own at all the Moots they participate in, our OCI hiring rates are on par with other law schools across Canada, our articling rates are on par with UBC and UVic. TRU produces capable lawyers just like every other law school in canada. Canada does not have a firm tier structure like the states does for law school and people need to stop trying to make it that way, its not how it works here. TRU has a holistic application process, which means that people with lower stats do have a better chance to get in but those lower stats will need to be countered with some other reason for the person to be admitted, something that proves you are still capable of performing at the level of the people with stronger stats. So while yes the school is more accessible to people with lower stats you really need to bring some else to the table if you want in. 

There is one major issue with TRU and that is the lack of notable alumni, which is due to the lack of graduates that have been in the workforce long enough to become partners at major firms.

Also the tuition is high, I could do without that.

Edited by lawstudent20202020
Forgot about the stupid tuition
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I think the above poster did a good job explaining the situation.  The biggest knock with TRU is the crazy tuition.  It was a problem when I attended years ago and still sucks.  I didn't bother reading the article since it was authored 2 years before TRU even became a school, but I can speak from my experience and other classmates, that none of us had any issues finding jobs (other than the issues every student faces). 

I graduated back in 2015 when we didn't even have significant OCI's, no legal clinics, mooting was just starting to become a thing and we didn't even have a law building until halfway through my degree.  Even with all of that and at a time when the stigma was probably at its highest because we were the second graduating class, I believe all but one person in my class of approx. 100 obtained articles.  The one person who didn't chose not to practice law. I don't know what current placement rates are because I couldn't be bothered to look that info up, but by all accounts, TRU grads seem to be doing just fine particularly in BC and AB. 

At the end of the day, law school is what you make of it.  You can go to any Canadian law school and if you do well, you'll be fine in your hunt for articles.  In contrast, you can go to what you perceive to be the best school but if you shit the bed and end up the worst student in your year, you'll be struggling to find a job despite the school you went to. 

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On 3/13/2019 at 10:12 AM, AKJ said:

Did not know they were considering opening up a law faculty at Simon Fraser University instead. That would have been a smart move and a lot more convenient for me haha. 

That plan got scrapped because the law society didn't see any point in having two law schools in Vancouver.

On 3/13/2019 at 10:29 AM, IrishStew said:

I think TRU is still considered one of the weaker law schools in Canada

These days TRU is getting OCI placement in downtown Vancouver at a rate comparable to UBC. TRU also has a ~96% article placement after graduation. The school and its alumni have, in a short period of time, built a pretty stellar reputation in BC for the quality of its graduates. The issue now is to expand that reputation across the country, because we don't have many graduates in Toronto/Ontario.

For anyone interested in working in BC or Alberta that can deal with the tuition, TRU is more than viable. If you're trying to stay in BC after graduating then I would pick TRU over any school outside of BC except Toronto/Osgoode.

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Why are people quoting articles from 2009 to make a point about a school in 2019?

The notion of old school lawyers negatively judging a school they havent heard of is also kind of silly.

Any school in Canada will place you just fine in Canada.  The tuition is a bit on the pricey side but its cheaper than Windsor/Windsor and all foreign options.

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On 3/16/2019 at 9:02 PM, canuckfanatic said:

If you're trying to stay in BC after graduating then I would pick TRU over any school outside of BC except Toronto/Osgoode.

Even over Calgary and UofA? My take on both of those schools vs. TRU is they have better access to a thriving Alberta legal market, and you can make your way to BC as well. Seems like there are more options, but perhaps if a student is dead set on being in BC then TRU is better?

The high tuition is what scares me away

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5 hours ago, IrishStew said:

Even over Calgary and UofA? My take on both of those schools vs. TRU is they have better access to a thriving Alberta legal market, and you can make your way to BC as well. Seems like there are more options, but perhaps if a student is dead set on being in BC then TRU is better?

The high tuition is what scares me away

Calgary and UofA have better access to Alberta than TRU for sure. But when it comes to BC, you'll interact with way more BC/Vancouver lawyers and law firms if you go to TRU. A couple downtown Vancouver "big law" firms host networking events in Kamloops for TRU students. It's also fairly easy to go to Vancouver (3.5 hour drive/30 minute flight) for interviews/networking. 

You're also learning BC laws at TRU (particularly BC civil procedure and the BC Corporations Act, Societies Act, etc.).

That's not to say Calgary/UofA students will have a hard time getting jobs in BC, I just think TRU's reputation in BC plus its proximity to Vancouver makes it a better option (if you can afford the tuition). Don't be worried if you go to a non-BC school, you'll still be able to find work in BC.

In any situation where you're applying for jobs in a city/province outside of your own, you should make it clear that you intend to stay in the employer's city for the long-term.

Edited by canuckfanatic
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