Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
stqust

Determining your L2/LSAT/Index score

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

In order to help us determine our numbers easier (and since the admissions office is bogged down right now and can't confirm our GPAs until later), I've prepared something small here. It should be helpful for future admissions cycles as well. If anyone has anything to add, feel free!

L2:

In order to calculate your L2, you have to go back the equivalent of 60 credits, and if the last course lands in the middle of a term, you have to use that entire term. 

If grades on your transcript are shown as letters, you have to use this scale:

 

Descriptor Letter Grade Grade Point Value

Excellent

A+

A

A-

4.0

4.0

3.7

Good

B+

B

B-

3.3

3.0

2.7

Satisfactory

C+

C

C-

2.3

2.0

1.7

Poor

D+

1.3

Minimal Pass

D

1.0

Failure

F

0.0

 

If grades on your transcript are shown as letters, you have to use this scale:

* Take your entire L2 percentage, and convert it to this GPA

70 = 2.5

71 = 2.6

72 = 2.7

73 = 2.8

74 = 2.9

75 = 3.0

76 = 3.1

77 = 3.2

78 = 3.3

79 = 3.4

80 = 3.5

81 = 3.6

82 = 3.7

83-84 = 3.8

85-86 = 3.9

87+ = 4.0

LSAT

Averaged, with XXX.5 rounded up

Index Score

GPA * 22.5 + LSAT

or

GPA * 22.0 + LSAT

Auto admit is 242 with the former and 240 with the latter, and it generally drops about 3 points until they start the holistic review.

 

 

Edited by stqust
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my understanding that the U of A only has access to the letter grade and not percentage? If this is true my L2 would be higher because at the school I go to (Macewan)90+=4.0, 85-89=3.7, 80-84=3.3 and so on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Grinder99 said:

It is my understanding that the U of A only has access to the letter grade and not percentage? If this is true my L2 would be higher because at the school I go to (Macewan)90+=4.0, 85-89=3.7, 80-84=3.3 and so on. 

MacEwan is not a percentage school, they are a letter grade school. When people are referring to a “percentage” school they’re referring to schools such as UBC where your grades are posted as percentages on your transcript, whereas like UofA MacEwan posts letter grades on your transcript and that’s what UofA law will look at. 

 

Edit: basically ignore your percentages at they mean nothing to UofA, all that matters is what’s on your transcript (official of course)

Edited by TheSaskConnection

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TheSaskConnection said:

MacEwan is not a percentage school, they are a letter grade school. When people are referring to a “percentage” school they’re referring to schools such as UBC where your grades are posted as percentages on your transcript, whereas like UofA MacEwan posts letter grades on your transcript and that’s what UofA law will look at. 

 

Edit: basically ignore your percentages at they mean nothing to UofA, all that matters is what’s on your transcript (official of course)

O yeah, I remember seeing that discussed on this forum. What if you have summer courses? When taking the last 60 will they include it? Even if you took the full course load during the fall and winter terms?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Grinder99 said:

O yeah, I remember seeing that discussed on this forum. What if you have summer courses? When taking the last 60 will they include it? Even if you took the full course load during the fall and winter terms?

There is pretty much zero exception to the rule of last 60 credits.  Summer and spring courses are 100% taken into account if they fall within the last 60 credits, and as previously stated by others if you have 57 credits and need one more to get that 60th credit, UofA will every course in that semester as opposed to cherry picking one of the 5 courses to choose from, which will result in your L60, actually being maybe L72. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TheSaskConnection said:

There is pretty much zero exception to the rule of last 60 credits.  Summer and spring courses are 100% taken into account if they fall within the last 60 credits, and as previously stated by others if you have 57 credits and need one more to get that 60th credit, UofA will every course in that semester as opposed to cherry picking one of the 5 courses to choose from, which will result in your L60, actually being maybe L72. 

My L60 consists of 4 terms with 5 for each term. In addition I have one summer course between the 2nd and 3rd terms that is a 4.0. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll give you an example 

fall 2018 / 5 courses

winter 18 / 5 courses 

fall 17 / 5 courses 

summer 17 / 2 courses 

spring 17 / 2 courses

winter 17 / 5 courses 

 

You will notice that counting backwards you will only have 19 courses done with spring 17 courses counted, which is a problem because you need 20 minimum, as such UofA will go back one more semester and take all 5 courses from winter 17 as well and now you have 24 courses that your gpa will be based on, as such your L60 is technically now a L72. I hope this helps clarify it bit, if you have any questions let me know and I’ll try to help. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know how I'd find out my LSAT to the specific decimal point? 

All I can see on LSAC is a straight 158. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, TheSaskConnection said:

I’ll give you an example 

fall 2018 / 5 courses

winter 18 / 5 courses 

fall 17 / 5 courses 

summer 17 / 2 courses 

spring 17 / 2 courses

winter 17 / 5 courses 

 

You will notice that counting backwards you will only have 19 courses done with spring 17 courses counted, which is a problem because you need 20 minimum, as such UofA will go back one more semester and take all 5 courses from winter 17 as well and now you have 24 courses that your gpa will be based on, as such your L60 is technically now a L72. I hope this helps clarify it bit, if you have any questions let me know and I’ll try to help. 

No, I'm currently in my last semester of my 4th year which doesn't count. I have a full course load for every single fall and winter semester that i've ever took in university. In addition to this I have a sumner course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Euroguy18 said:

Does anyone know how I'd find out my LSAT to the specific decimal point? 

All I can see on LSAC is a straight 158. 

LSAT scores are given in whole numbers only, no decimals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"LSAT

Averaged, with XXX.5 rounded up"

Then what's up with this? 

I'm confused. How do I know if my LSAT mark will be rounded up or not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Grinder99 said:

No, I'm currently in my last semester of my 4th year which doesn't count. I have a full course load for every single fall and winter semester that i've ever took in university. In addition to this I have a sumner course.

Fall 2018: 5

Summer 2018: 1

Winter / Spring 2018: 5

Fall 2017: 5

Winter 2017: 5

They will count 21 courses in your case.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Euroguy18 said:

"LSAT

Averaged, with XXX.5 rounded up"

Then what's up with this? 

I'm confused. How do I know if my LSAT mark will be rounded up or not?

Very simple if the average of your lsat attempts taken in the last 5 years ends up being any number xxx.5 or higher it will be rounded up, e.g 161.6 = 162 and 157.481 = 157

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...