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Sasha7

Best Online Prep-Course for June 2019 & TIPS?

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Hello Law students! 

I want to take the LSAT this June 2019:

What is, or are, the best online prep course(s) to help me practice, understand, ask questions, and prepare for this test?

*Please include your reasons as to why you believe the course of your choice is the best.

Also, please share insight into:

- How your studying helped or inhibited your understanding

- What you did to prepare for your LSAT

- Any tips that you can share to help me become better at understanding or doing well on the LSAT is appreciated

 

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Have you tried doing a practice test? 

I might be wrong here but it seems that you are assuming you'll need a prep course in order to "help me practice, understand, ask questions, and prepare for this test," and none of those things require an online course.

I'm sure prep courses have helped a bunch of people but before you decide to spend money on one see if it is in fact necessary for you to get the score you need. 

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20 minutes ago, BearPatrol said:

Have you tried doing a practice test? 

I might be wrong here but it seems that you are assuming you'll need a prep course in order to "help me practice, understand, ask questions, and prepare for this test," and none of those things require an online course.

I'm sure prep courses have helped a bunch of people but before you decide to spend money on one see if it is in fact necessary for you to get the score you need. 

I understand why you think some people wouldn't "need" a prep course, but I don't believe that's a logical approach when it can only enhance your skills anyway. I have heard many people say "x course was such a waste of money...just self-study", but these same people don't have scores I want to achieve. 

I am looking to increase my odds of scoring high, thus self-study, when I have never taken the test, is not the best method in my opinion. Thoughts?

Edited by Sasha7

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1 hour ago, Sasha7 said:

I understand why you think some people wouldn't "need" a prep course, but I don't believe that's a logical approach when it can only enhance your skills anyway. I have heard many people say "x course was such a waste of money...just self-study", but these same people don't have scores I want to achieve. 

I am looking to increase my odds of scoring high, thus self-study, when I have never taken the test, is not the best method in my opinion. Thoughts?

 

I'm a little confused by the example given that the people you are quoting took the course and still didn't get scores that would satisfy you, which undercuts the notion that it'll only enhance your skills anyway.

I'm not advocating for self-study as a universal best practice. I'd only caution against the assumption that an online course is required and that it will improve your chances over and above publicly available resources online. 

Take KhanAcademy for instance. There is a heck of a whole lot of information on there and it seems to me that someone who exhausts all of that is probably going to be as prepared as someone who took an online prep course. Now maybe your the type of person who needs a personalized approach and someone to spot the errors you are making, in which case an online course might be a better option. It is up to you to figure out how you can maximize your chances of scoring high given your individual study preferences and habits. 

Edited by BearPatrol
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I used 7Sage as an online course and did a lot of self studying. I found it was a nice combination. Here's more details on my prep but feel free to PM me if you have more questions.

 

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On 3/2/2019 at 1:27 PM, Aschenbach said:

I used 7Sage as an online course and did a lot of self studying. I found it was a nice combination. Here's more details on my prep but feel free to PM me if you have more questions.

 

Thank you, I appreciate you answering this question. What are your thoughts on studying for 3 months, as in now until the June test? 

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On my first and only write thus far, I scored a pathetic 159.

 

My study method:

I mainly relied on drilling PTs back-to-back. I got accustomed to the different types of questions and really focused in on two things

  1. Why I chose the wrong answer
  2. What made the correct answer, correct

This worked decently for me in terms of understanding logical reasoning and reading comprehension. But it did not work too well for analytical reasoning (logic games), hence my low score. Throughout my PTs, the AR section was generally the only volatile one, and come test-day I ended up with (-10) in AR.

 

Current study method:

Realizing that AR is officially my weakest section, I've been taking a new approach in how I prep. I have been using 7Sage's videos and tutorials for tackling Logic Games. I've also given their "Fool Proof Method for a Perfect LG Score" a shot. Though generally still considered self-study, the 7Sage videos on Logic Games have really helped me learn and apply the different techniques to up-ing my efficiency and consistency when it comes to AR. I've since been getting (-0, or -1) in the AR section for PTs and have thus improved my avg score to 165-168.

Many say that LSAT prep courses can help you achieve a generally, above average, score. However, if you want to really be the cream of the crop you have to supplement prep courses with copious amounts of self-study.

- How your studying helped or inhibited your understanding

For the logical reasoning and reading comprehension sections, the key for me was to self-evaluate what made me choose the wrong answer. What held me back was not spending more time on the AR sections and learning the different techniques. Pretty standard, find your weakness and make it your b*tch. 

- What you did to prepare for your LSAT

Self-studied and lots of PrepTests. I am now using 7Sage video explanations for LG section.

- Any tips that you can share to help me become better at understanding or doing well on the LSAT is appreciated

I am by no means, an expert. Although, what helped me raise my score was understanding that the LSAT is consistent and predictable. So, I became intimately familiar with the different types of questions that popped up all.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

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Hey! I'm am by no means an expert when it comes to the LSAT but I can offer some advice:

I took an online course with PowerScore. It was done through a program called blackboard. You could hear the instructor talk and see their writing. The course comes with books which have all the lesson information, your homework questions, tips and tricks, etc. The course also comes with a book with 4 full practice tests and a book with 10 practice tests excluding the experimental sections. There's 12 lessons in total, each lasting 3 hours, and some course schedules have a lesson only once a week while others offer a lesson 3 times a week. Mine was 3 times a week so my course lasted about a month.

The course is very fast paced. Every time you have a lesson, you're giving a ton of homework which consists of practice questions to complete. They understand that you may not be able to finish all the homework before the next lesson so they give you a list of "essential" homework questions to complete out of all the homework given. Personally, I thought that I may as well just do the course at my own pace and complete all the homework so that I'm getting as much practice as possible. All the lessons are recorded so I would just do all the homework, and watch the next lesson whenever I felt ready instead of feeling pressured to watch it live (only downside to this is you can't ask questions while the lesson is happening but you are given contact info to ask questions at any time outside of the lessons). Once I got the hang of the homework, I started timing myself on the questions as well. 

Overall, I found the course to be super helpful. It taught tons of important tips and great ways to do questions without taking too much time. With that being said, I definitely did still feel a little weak in some areas, so once I had finished the course, I printed past LSAT questions from sections I was struggling with and did those while timing myself. Then for a while I did practice tests under the same conditions as the real test (woke up at the time same, timed myself, etc.). I find that this is really helpful especially if your LSAT is going to be early in the morning. The LSAT is exhausting and requires a lot of mental endurance, so you really do have to try and prepare your mind for that. The only thing is, don't just do practice tests robotically - check them over when you're done and see the sections which you're not scoring well on or the type of questions you tend to get wrong, and work on those.

On the practices tests, I was averaging around 163-168. But on the real test I got a 160 which isn't terrible, but I was still a little disappointed. I'm honestly not sure why my test score dropped. It could be due to test anxiety, it could be due to the fact that I wasn't well rested, or idk if this is just me, but I did find that the more recent practice tests were harder, especially the reading comp sections. I was initially doing less recent practice tests, and when I started doing the most recent ones closer to my actual test, I found my scores were dropping...not sure if that was just a coincidence or due to burnout. 

Personally, I think any well structured course will serve you well, the rest is up to you and how much time you put into studying and how well you are targeting your practice. I would highly suggest having a consistent studying schedule and sticking to it because once you start taking random days off here and there, things start getting thrown off. I think it's better to study for smaller amounts of time, but on more days, then to study, say, once a week, but for the whole day. It's also definitely important to realize that you can't study all day everyday, because you will burn out and that definitely can affect your performance. It's okay to give yourself a break if you need it!

I think 3 months is definitely enough time to practice unless you have a job or something that's going to take up a lot of your time, in which case you may need more than 3 months. 

Hope this helps! Good luck :) 

Edited by sf20

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39 minutes ago, sf20 said:

but I did find that the more recent practice tests were harder, especially the reading comp sections.

The recent reading comprehension sections and LR sections are generally considered to be more difficult than the older ones. 

Great job getting a 160! Are you planning on rewriting?

If nerves and test-day anxiety were your issue, I highly recommend watching: 

It may not help everyone, but it did help me. Just thinking about the fact that I wasn't forced to be here, but instead here because this is a potential step towards furthering myself professionally (which is pretty exciting) put me in positive head-space. 

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20 minutes ago, Celestial said:

The recent reading comprehension sections and LR sections are generally considered to be more difficult than the older ones. 

Great job getting a 160! Are you planning on rewriting?

If nerves and test-day anxiety were your issue, I highly recommend watching: 

It may not help everyone, but it did help me. Just thinking about the fact that I wasn't forced to be here, but instead here because this is a potential step towards furthering myself professionally (which is pretty exciting) put me in positive head-space. 

Ah that makes so much sense!!! It's definitely a good idea for people to be aware of that then. Also thanks so much!! I didn't end up rewriting but I was considering it. I applied for this cycle and have been accepted so thankfully it worked out well for me! 

Thank you for the video, I'll definitely check it out! 

Edited by sf20
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3 hours ago, Sasha7 said:

Thank you, I appreciate you answering this question. What are your thoughts on studying for 3 months, as in now until the June test? 

It depends on where you are and how much you want to improve. My initial diagnostic was in the low 150's; I wanted to get to the high 160's since my GPA wasn't that great. I work a pretty demanding full-time job (50-60 hours/week) and I needed the whole year to get my goal score.

If you only need a 5-8 point increase from your diagnostic and you don't have to work/go to school, then 3 months should be enough.

I would target the June exam but if you find you need more time, you're still ahead of the game even if you write in September.

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On 3/2/2019 at 1:27 PM, Aschenbach said:

I used 7Sage as an online course and did a lot of self studying. I found it was a nice combination. Here's more details on my prep but feel free to PM me if you have more questions.

 

I agree with this. 7Sage is one of the best resources out there! 

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