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Are there benefits to writing the bar in Ottawa instead of Toronto?

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I know that Toronto tends to be busy for writing the bar (i.e.: I've heard it takes about 7 hours to get everyone seated and writing the exams). But are there other benefits to writing outside Toronto? Are the exams marked the same across the board? For example, is it easier to pass the bar in Ottawa because there are less people writing or something like that? 

Thanks!

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Lol no, the exams are centrally marked and it is all the same test. Just write it where it is most convenient for you. It is not like driving tests where there is an advantage to go to smaller towns where there is less traffic. 

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I wrote both my exams in Toronto, but at different times and at different Toronto locations: the Barrister in June at the Ex and the Solicitor in November near the airport. The November exam was noticeably less busy …. but did it have any impact on my actual experience? Not really. We got out of the room a bit quicker at lunch and at the end of the exam, but again, I don't think having an extra 10 minutes at lunch made any difference to me. I think you're more likely to be impacted by where you're actually seated in the room (i.e. are you under a cold or noisy vent, are you close to the washrooms if you need a quick break, do you have a noisy writer beside you, etc.) 

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I would say the only benefit is that there are less people writing in Ottawa, hence less hectic, wait times, etc.

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2 hours ago, GreysAnatomy said:

I know that Toronto tends to be busy for writing the bar (i.e.: I've heard it takes about 7 hours to get everyone seated and writing the exams). But are there other benefits to writing outside Toronto? Are the exams marked the same across the board? For example, is it easier to pass the bar in Ottawa because there are less people writing or something like that? 

Thanks!

That is insane and not true.

Everyone gets seated pretty promptly. It's the admin and the announcements (in English and French) that slow things down, and I expect it to be a problem in both Toronto and Ottawa.

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2 hours ago, ghoulzrulez said:

 I think you're more likely to be impacted by where you're actually seated in the room (i.e. are you under a cold or noisy vent, are you close to the washrooms if you need a quick break, do you have a noisy writer beside you, etc.) 

Yes, sometimes noise can be an issue.  Bring a pair of earplugs just in case.  

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The exams take 7 hours each to write, which might be what you are thinking of. Getting everyone through security (some of the rules are ridiculously stringent, which may add to the screening time) and seated did take some time, but it's certainly not worth writing in Ottawa just to avoid that.

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3 hours ago, Porkypig said:

Yes, sometimes noise can be an issue.  Bring a pair of earplugs just in case.  

During my solicitor exam, I was seated under a vent that was cranking out a ridiculous amount of dry, hot air, which caused me to get a light nose bleed during the final hour of writing. So yeah, prepare to power through whatever distractions might get tossed your way. 

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7 hours ago, GreysAnatomy said:

I know that Toronto tends to be busy for writing the bar (i.e.: I've heard it takes about 7 hours to get everyone seated and writing the exams). But are there other benefits to writing outside Toronto? Are the exams marked the same across the board? For example, is it easier to pass the bar in Ottawa because there are less people writing or something like that? 

Thanks!

The exam writing location in Ottawa is a pain in the ass to get to if you do not have a car.  I think I used a combo of bus and cab.

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8 hours ago, GreysAnatomy said:

I know that Toronto tends to be busy for writing the bar (i.e.: I've heard it takes about 7 hours to get everyone seated and writing the exams). But are there other benefits to writing outside Toronto? Are the exams marked the same across the board? For example, is it easier to pass the bar in Ottawa because there are less people writing or something like that? 

Thanks!

It's a multiple choice test. There's no latitude for subjective marking.

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