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angelfromtor

What is the most affordable law school in Canada?

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Tuition is huge, but don't overlook the cost of living into the calculation.  Especially for BC/ON schools. 

For years I was paying $1250-1500 for an apartment in a couple of the bigger cities. Currently paying half that in a smaller city. Multiply that by 3 years = $18 - 27K savings (rent alone).  Not a trivial factor.   

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UNB is a good bet. Tuition is among the lowest and as someone who grew up in Toronto I found the cost of living to be outrageously low. When I tell my friends that you can rent a 2 bedroom apartment in Fredericton for $600 a month they are absolutely dumbfounded and cannot believe it. 

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Don't know what people from other places pay (Ive heard 9K for out of province) but McGill at 4500/year is a steal for a Common and Civil law degree. Also rent in montreal is inexpensive and cost of living pretty low. 

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4 hours ago, Rashabon said:

Don't be pissed because your post was written terribly.

I wasn't pissed. I read @ProfReader's comment as being incredibly condescending, so I replied in a condescending manner.

"I don't know what student is" could have easily been replaced by a polite question asking me to clarify my poor placement of a slash.

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Just now, IrishStew said:

I wasn't pissed. I read @ProfReader's comment as being incredibly condescending, so I replied in a condescending manner.

I've replied to you via PM about your choice to interpret those words as condescending, rather than replying here and further derailing things.

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In the spirit of steering things back towards the topic, I am not of the opinion that scholarships should factor into one's decision about which school to attend, with two exceptions. The first is if you have an entrance scholarship in hand. The second is if the school has a financial aid program where you are guaranteed to receive certain funds if your income falls below prescribed level. Beyond that, it is just too difficult to predict whether your grades will be sufficient to receive scholarships in 2L or 3L.

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16 minutes ago, ProfReader said:

In the spirit of steering things back towards the topic, I am not of the opinion that scholarships should factor into one's decision about which school to attend, with two exceptions. The first is if you have an entrance scholarship in hand. The second is if the school has a financial aid program where you are guaranteed to receive certain funds if your income falls below prescribed level. Beyond that, it is just too difficult to predict whether your grades will be sufficient to receive scholarships in 2L or 3L.

I think this is particularly relevant advice for the people who ask for advice about crap-tier U.S. schools promising a great scholarship, with the condition they keep their grades at a certain level. Might as well accept a scholarship predicated on winning a midway game.

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Two additional thoughts...

OP, I don't think anyone has told you this directly, but you definitely shouldn't just find the cheapest law school and go there because of financial reasons.  Debt sucks, of course, but you also need to think of your future career.  For example, does whatever cheap school that you are considering position you to work in the market in which you want to work?  You also need to think about the costs of travelling back and forth to wherever you want to work for Christmases, summers, interviews, etc.  If you want to work in Ontario, I think that you need to just bite the bullet, take out the loans, and go somewhere other than Osgoode or UofT. 

My second thought is that people have raised a variety of cost considerations here: future earning potential, tuition, cost of living.  One thing that hasn't really been mentioned, but which I noted above, are the costs related to going to school in a city in which you don't live.  For example, I went to law school across the country from where I lived.  This meant plane tickets for holidays and every September/April, costs to ship my stuff there at the start of 1L and back at the end of 3L, buying a bunch of stuff when I got there because it was too expensive to ship, paying to store my stuff over the summers, and I lost a bit of money every single month in the summer because the sublet market wasn't great.  There are also personal reasons that it may be easier not moving around like that (i.e. friendships, relationships).  And packing and moving are the absolute worst.  Now this wouldn't be enough for me to pick, for example, UofT over Queen's if I wanted to end up in Toronto because of the huge difference in tuition.  However, it might be a significant factor if I wanted to end up, for example, in Calgary and was deciding between UofC and UofA.

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On 3/6/2019 at 5:44 PM, ProfReader said:

The second is if the school has a financial aid program where you are guaranteed to receive certain funds if your income falls below prescribed level

Anyone know which schools have anything like this?

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4 hours ago, IrishStew said:

Anyone know which schools have anything like this?

The only Canadian school that currently has such a program is U of T.

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