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angelfromtor

What is the most affordable law school in Canada?

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I'm planning to go to law school, my finances are tight and I would like to attend the most affordable law school, I'm from Ontario but I am willing to move to other provinces as well.

Thanks beforehand

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26 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

I think it’s McGill, isn’t it?

Only for QC residents. Otherwise, I think it is pretty much on par with a number of the other less expensive schools. 

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Some of the prairie and or BC schools might be similar to McGill (plus or minus 2-3 mil). Even some of the maritime schools too?

 

McGill is 3.5 if you don't want to stretch yourself too thin. That one year of lost wages and extra 5 grand factors into total cost pretty significantly, almost enough to bring it close to non Toronto Ontario schools (assuming you would find paid articles and that would be your opportunity cost).

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I had the same concerns as you so I applied to Uvic (10.5 k/year) and UBC (13 k/ year). Conveniently, BC is also where I want to practice...cause hiking and stuff.

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Uvic is <10K, NB is similar. U of A prob next cheapest 

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Assuming you’re not in a hurry to start law school, you could move to Quebec beforehand, live and work there 12 months (and use that time to improve your French skills if you’re not confident in them) and then acquire resident status for the purpose of your degree at McGill

https://www.mcgill.ca/legaldocuments/quebec

You would also become eligible at the same time for the Quebec bursaries and loans program, which is pretty generous.

http://www.afe.gouv.qc.ca/en/loans-and-bursariesfull-time-studies/loans-and-bursaries-program/

You would then pay Quebec fees: $4,470/annum, meaning less than 16K if you chose to graduate in 3.5 years or 13K for a 6 semesters degree.

https://mcgill.ca/student-accounts/tuition-charges/fallwinter-term-tuition-and-fees/undergraduate-fees

Edited by Girona
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2 hours ago, angelfromtor said:

I'm planning to go to law school, my finances are tight and I would like to attend the most affordable law school, I'm from Ontario but I am willing to move to other provinces as well.

Thanks beforehand

If 'most affordable' means lowest tuition then UVic & UBC have got to be in there along with UoM and UNB (all around $10-12k/year). If you're looking at overall cost of living, housing costs drive the BC schools to far less affordable levels compared to eg Winnipeg or Fredericton.

 

McGill is its own kettle of fish due to differential pricing for Quebec v RoC students, time taken for degree, opportunity cost during that time, etc.

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Posted (edited)

Calgary is worth a look as well. The tuition is competitive (~$12,500) and they offer a differential tuition bursary. And the cost of living is attractive as well, especially if you're comparing it on a value basis rather than a nominal one. Calgary, to me, offers far more to residents than Winnipeg and (I assume) Fredericton.

Edited by Brookvale
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Uvic and Ubc are probably the best bang for your buck if your not a quebec resident. 

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5 hours ago, Brookvale said:

Calgary is worth a look as well. The tuition is competitive (~$12,500) and they offer a differential tuition bursary. And the cost of living is attractive as well, especially if you're comparing it on a value basis rather than a nominal one. Calgary, to me, offers far more to residents than Winnipeg and (I assume) Fredericton.

Alberta is good for the same reason.  Competitive tuition, good cost of living, great access to the Calgary legal market, good reputation, and you get to go to school in a concrete bunker!

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9 minutes ago, ProfReader said:

Alberta is good for the same reason.  Competitive tuition, good cost of living, great access to the Calgary legal market, good reputation, and you get to go to school in a concrete bunker!

Hahah, concrete bunker. That describes the Law Centre perfectly. The Law Centre is cold, and ugly but tuition is cheap, and Edmonton is decent in the summer. 

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UNB probably. I looked into this as well. Just factoring in cost of living vs. UBC, UVic and Calgary. UNB arguably has some of the best scholarships / student as well.

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1 minute ago, IrishStew said:

UNB arguably has some of the best scholarships / student as well.

I don't know what "student" is.  I'm not convinced that they have some of the best scholarships.  They aren't exactly known for being flush with cash or having rich alumni.  Where are you getting this data?  Against cost, you would also have to weigh the career prospects.

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9 minutes ago, ProfReader said:

I don't know what "student" is.  I'm not convinced that they have some of the best scholarships.  They aren't exactly known for being flush with cash or having rich alumni.  Where are you getting this data?  Against cost, you would also have to weigh the career prospects.

Do you know what "per" is? Oftentimes "per" or "/" is used to identify a rate, and in this case I was showing dollars (or scholarships) PER student. Familiar with it?

UNB gave away close to 300k (+/- 50k) I believe last year in scholarships to students. They have 80 students/year (that's per year...) in their faculty. Check out their scholarships here: https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/law/_assets/documents/forms/scholarships.pdf

As for career prospects: if you're insinuating that UNB has poor career opportunities I think you're over-generalizing, and that's another debate entirely. This goes back to the classic "a top student at X school has the same opportunity as a top UofT student to get a job at Y firm" argument, and I don't really care to argue it because there are people here that know far more than I do about legal career prospects. Some students aren't getting a legal education to get the highest paying job either.

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Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

Do you know what "per" is? Oftentimes "per" or "/" is used to identify a rate, and in this case I was showing dollars (or scholarships) PER student. Familiar with it?

UNB gave away close to 300k (+/- 50k) I believe last year in scholarships to students. They have 80 students/year (that's per year...) in their faculty. Check out their scholarships here: https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/law/_assets/documents/forms/scholarships.pdf

As for career prospects: if you're insinuating that UNB has poor career opportunities I think you're over-generalizing, and that's another debate entirely. This goes back to the classic "a top student at X school has the same opportunity as a top UofT student to get a job at Y firm" argument, and I don't really care to argue it because there are people here that know far more than I do about legal career prospects. Some students aren't getting a legal education to get the highest paying job either.

You don't need to be a douche about it.  The weird spacing made me think that something was left out.  Most people don't leave spaces around the /.  Also "best scholarships/student" is a weird way of calculating things since "best" isn't really a variable that you can divide up.  Most money per student seems to be what you meant.  I can see the UNB scholarships and many of them require residency.  More importantly though, where is your comparative data on this to indicate that UNB is more affordable because of them?  I was talking about UofA before, so I had a look at their website and they give $1.1 in scholarships and bursaries a year.  That is more per student.  Dal has $2 million per year.

I didn't say that UNB has "poor career opportunities", but I also think that other schools have better ones for similar tuition.

Edited by ProfReader
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15 hours ago, IrishStew said:

Do you know what "per" is? Oftentimes "per" or "/" is used to identify a rate, and in this case I was showing dollars (or scholarships) PER student. Familiar with it?

UNB gave away close to 300k (+/- 50k) I believe last year in scholarships to students. They have 80 students/year (that's per year...) in their faculty. Check out their scholarships here: https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/law/_assets/documents/forms/scholarships.pdf

As for career prospects: if you're insinuating that UNB has poor career opportunities I think you're over-generalizing, and that's another debate entirely. This goes back to the classic "a top student at X school has the same opportunity as a top UofT student to get a job at Y firm" argument, and I don't really care to argue it because there are people here that know far more than I do about legal career prospects. Some students aren't getting a legal education to get the highest paying job either.

I think you're the only person that would have interpreted your post as per rather than a slash indicating best scholarships and student, because it was a completely idiosyncratic way of writing it.

Don't be pissed because your post was written terribly.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, whereverjustice said:

There is information on that page that was out of date when I graduated from law school in 2011. Caveat lector.

Looks like it was updated in 2018. Regardless, it's a very good starting point.

Edited by Linaelm

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