Jump to content
IrishStew

Law School Calendar

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone. I'm quite passionate about travel and I have several big trips I would like to do before I start "in the real world" after school. These trips would be several months long, so I need to plan my career goals and life well in advance if I want to get them in! 

For a typical student what do they do after their 1L year? Do they get a legal internship? Is it really important to get something before 2L (my understanding is that in 2L you will get a job that will hopefully lead to an articling position).

Does class usually end in April and start up again in September? 

After I finished undergrad I know myself and my peers could negotiate start times for our jobs we were recruited for. Is this common in law? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

All of these answers are about the Toronto market.

Hi everyone. I'm quite passionate about travel and I have several big trips I would like to do before I start "in the real world" after school. These trips would be several months long, so I need to plan my career goals and life well in advance if I want to get them in! 

You should do all of these things before starting law school and in the summer after 1L. You can also do an exchange term in the first semester of your third year if you want to travel while in school. However, you should probably only go on exchange after lining up articles so that you aren't on another continent while you could be looking.

For a typical student what do they do after their 1L year? Do they get a legal internship? Is it really important to get something before 2L (my understanding is that in 2L you will get a job that will hopefully lead to an articling position).

Anything they want. Some top students land 1L jobs on Bay, others might work for professors, others might use their connections to get a law firm job, still others might go back to whatever they were doing before law school for the summer, others travel, you probably get the idea. You do not need a law job after 1L to be successful in the 2L summer recruit.

 Does class usually end in April and start up again in September? 

Yes.

After I finished undergrad I know myself and my peers could negotiate start times for our jobs we were recruited for. Is this common in law? 

I'm actually not sure. I think this would depend on where you end up; the larger the firm, the more unlikely I imagine this would be. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@easttowest I'm sure the Toronto market is fairly representative of other large markets in Canada, so thanks. Exchange would be cool, but like you said - I think 3L is a really important time to secure jobs for after school, so I wouldn't want to be overseas unless something is set in stone. 

I have a few follow-up questions regarding that 1L summer. Is it frowned upon to not be pursuing a Bay Street job at all by recruiters? When you say "bay street job" are you referring to something law related, or in banking or something else like that? Sounds like these students would just be going after typical internships that would be available to undergraduate students as well? In the summer 2L recruit what kind of skills are these recruiters looking for in you? I'm sure it's best to develop whatever they may be looking for in your 1L summer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

@easttowest I'm sure the Toronto market is fairly representative of other large markets in Canada, so thanks. Exchange would be cool, but like you said - I think 3L is a really important time to secure jobs for after school, so I wouldn't want to be overseas unless something is set in stone. 

I have a few follow-up questions regarding that 1L summer. Is it frowned upon to not be pursuing a Bay Street job at all by recruiters? When you say "bay street job" are you referring to something law related, or in banking or something else like that? Sounds like these students would just be going after typical internships that would be available to undergraduate students as well? In the summer 2L recruit what kind of skills are these recruiters looking for in you? I'm sure it's best to develop whatever they may be looking for in your 1L summer?

Actually, Calgary is quite different and many 1Ls get law firm jobs in the summer before 2L. 

3L is only important for the job hunt if you have not found articles either through the 2L summer recruit, through a clerkship that you will apply for in the winter of 2L, or the structured articling recruit that takes place in the summer after 2L. Some students will still be looking for articles through 3L, but many will have articles before class begins in 3L. That's why many students do their exchange in 3L. 

"Bay Street job" means a job at one of the national, international, or boutique law firms in downtown Toronto. These are not internships; they are paid summer jobs that often lead to articles, and hopefully an associate position at the firm after that. Some students care quite a bit about getting one of these jobs; others care not at all. Do not feel pressured to pursue this path.

Recruiters do not care at all if you do not pursue a 1L job on Bay Street. 

As far as what skills recruiters look for, there are many threads on this forum about Bay Street recruitment and people far more knowledgeable than me have shared their wisdom there. I am sure if you poke around the "Career Services" section you'll find lots of information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • Rejected Friday.  L2: 3.0 LSAT: 158 Excellent LOR and EC's. I volunteered with two organizations for 5 years through my undergrad and worked full time as well. Recently been volunteering as a court worker.  I knew it was a long shot especially with my GPA but thought I would try anyway! Good luck to all who are still waiting! 
    • Want to work in Canada? Go to UofT. Get an articling job. Go to England on exchange in 3L.
    • Waitlisted March 19th!!!  LSAT - 145 (will be re-writing in September and so on if I don't get in for 2019) cGPA - 3.55  L2 - 3.8 TONS of work experience (even worked two jobs in 3rd year) - now currently working for the government Northern Ontario resident too!  Fingers crossed for all of us wait-listed! There's hope, I know someone who got in off the waitlist last year! 
    • From what it sounds like there has to be at least 100 most likely more. I don’t know how that works out when they have to cut it down to Manitoba Residents only. 🤷🏻‍♂️
    • I am not a 1L. One might say I am a "5L" (good grief where did the time go). But I thought I'd chime in and help you out, and also provide this information to others who may not understand how law school grading works. Law school classes are graded on a curve, generally curved to a "B" (specifically in 1L). What this means is that your individual level of achievement is relatively meaningless; what matters is how you compare against the rest of your class. For example - let's say you get a 75% on your first year criminal law exam as a raw score. In an undergrad program, that would compute to a "B". But in law school it's not so simple! If everyone else in your class scored in the 50s, and you got a 75, you might have an A+. If everyone else got a 77, and you only got a 75, you may end up with a C. Different classes and different professors are known to have different "curves". Some classes have a "flat curve" (e.g. out of 60 people, maybe 40 get Bs, 10 get a B+ and 10 get a B-). Others may have a very "steep curve" (e.g. out of 60 people, maybe 10 get Bs, 10 get a B+, 10 get a B-, 10 get an A-, 10 get a C+, 5 get a flat A and 5 get a flat C). You can picture how the same person taking these two classes could end up with wildly different grades. So to answer your second question, in order to get A's in every class, you would have to perform better than basically everyone else in every one of your classes. That's statistically improbable, because law school is full of smart, hard-working people, all of whom want to be top of their class. And the fact is, you simply cannot ALL be top of the class. I'd note that while different schools may have slight differences in how they handle grading, every Ontario law school grades on a curve like this. This is not a Western-specific phenomenon. Hopefully that helps.
×
×
  • Create New...