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IrishStew

EPJ Residence / Miscellaneous Questions

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Seriously considering attending UNB next fall and their mature residence looks cool. Anyone here that has lived in there? 

- What is the demographic of students? Mostly graduate? Do law students typically live together in units? What time of the year are students deciding where to live?

- What % of law students live in there? 

- Is everything fully furnished? 

- Anyone have pictures they can share? There is very little information online

- How large is the building? (i.e. # of floors)

- Do many law students opt for the meal plan on campus? 

Other questions: 

- What is the average age of the faculty? 

- Is the faculty tight knit? 

- Is it more of a party atmosphere or academic atmosphere? 

- My understanding is that UNB has some of the best scholarships for admissions in the country, as well as in upper years. How true is that? 

- How helpful is the career services center? 

- Where do most students go to work after graduation?

- Are there as many extracurricular activities as there are at other law schools? For example clubs. Does the law school have their own intramural teams? 

- Is the faculty sort of a 50/50 split male/female? 

- What is the dominant stream of specialization among students? (i.e. business law, family law, private practice etc.)

- How are the career prospects within the Atlantic region for UNB grads compared to Dal grads? Do most students secure internships in 1L and 2L and then easily secure articling positions? 

- Is the international exchange program popular? 

- How is Ludlow Hall? Do most students like it? Is there a lot of space in the library to study? Are the classrooms nice? 

Sorry for all the questions just looking for all the information I can get! Thanks in advance

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Answered as many of your questions as I had fulsome answers for. 

EPJ in my first year (2015) was maybe 50% law students, or at least it felt that way. Other students are primarily grads or upper year undergrads. Fully furnished. It's a bit bland looking but functional. 4 floors - there's a "basement level" (it's only basement on one side of the building because it's built into a slope) and 3 floors above that. I didn't opt for a meal card and don't know many who did. The apartments in EPJ all have pretty good kitchens, most folks I knew cooked.

I'd add about EPJ that it's great because your path to Ludlow is 2 mins long and flat. This is key if you don't drive, because Ludlow is in the middle of a hill, and once it gets icy, just about anything but EPJ is a treacherous walk.

Average age is close to 23-24, with a big chunk of folks who did something after undergrad and were in the 25-28 range. The faculty is very tight knit - so much so that students call it "Ludlow High". The atmosphere depends on you - there were plenty of rowdy nights but lots of people formed long-lasting and regular study groups. Ludlow Hall itself has a nice library, you'll usually have space to study; if not there, the main undergrad library is closeby and has lots of seating. Classrooms are okay. I don't recall any major issues people had with the building, except that some of the classrooms get chilly. 

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18 hours ago, uwotm8 said:

Answered as many of your questions as I had fulsome answers for. 

EPJ in my first year (2015) was maybe 50% law students, or at least it felt that way. Other students are primarily grads or upper year undergrads. Fully furnished. It's a bit bland looking but functional. 4 floors - there's a "basement level" (it's only basement on one side of the building because it's built into a slope) and 3 floors above that. I didn't opt for a meal card and don't know many who did. The apartments in EPJ all have pretty good kitchens, most folks I knew cooked.

I'd add about EPJ that it's great because your path to Ludlow is 2 mins long and flat. This is key if you don't drive, because Ludlow is in the middle of a hill, and once it gets icy, just about anything but EPJ is a treacherous walk.

Average age is close to 23-24, with a big chunk of folks who did something after undergrad and were in the 25-28 range. The faculty is very tight knit - so much so that students call it "Ludlow High". The atmosphere depends on you - there were plenty of rowdy nights but lots of people formed long-lasting and regular study groups. Ludlow Hall itself has a nice library, you'll usually have space to study; if not there, the main undergrad library is closeby and has lots of seating. Classrooms are okay. I don't recall any major issues people had with the building, except that some of the classrooms get chilly. 

Did you live in EPJ for all 3 years or just 1st and then found roommates? 

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21 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

Did you live in EPJ for all 3 years or just 1st and then found roommates? 

I transferred after 1st year, but was planning on going back to EPJ for 2nd year. Had I remained I probably would have kept on through to 3rd year. It's nice having that much convenience for the price I paid (e.g. I didn't have to make subletting arrangements for the summer, didn't have to go about Freddy buying furniture, etc.)

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1 hour ago, uwotm8 said:

I transferred after 1st year, but was planning on going back to EPJ for 2nd year. Had I remained I probably would have kept on through to 3rd year. It's nice having that much convenience for the price I paid (e.g. I didn't have to make subletting arrangements for the summer, didn't have to go about Freddy buying furniture, etc.)

Do students often get legal jobs after 1L and 2L in the Fredricton area? Seems as though that would be a hassle with an 8 month lease, as you'd need to find living arrangements for the summer? But perhaps EPJ allows you to live there over the summer for an additional fee? Do you know if students at EPJ can pay for parking nearby?

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17 hours ago, IrishStew said:

Do you know if students at EPJ can pay for parking nearby? 

If you have a car, I would argue you have no reason to live on campus. You can get much more apartment space for a lower cost renting in the city. Start you research here: 

https://killamreit.com/apartments?region=fredericton

Car insurance and gas are cheap, and you can get to school within 15-20 minutes driving from pretty much any part of the city.

And even if you walk, there are apartment buildings within walking distance. The sidewalks are messy in winter, but it's the Maritimes...

The scholarships are indeed unrivalled. Also, the tuition is relatively low, and although it is set to increase in the coming year, every student is "grandfathered," paying the same tuition throughout the three years of study as he paid in the first year. So Ludlow is a rather economical law school.

Few students get legal jobs in Fredericton after first year, the city being rather small. It is a bit better in 2L summer, but many firms hire just articling students, not summer students.

Across the Maritimes, however, our career prospects are about the same as those of the Dalhousie crowd. People from Ludlow land jobs across the four provinces, and even in the other regions of the country if they are keen on it.

I do not think the exchange program is particularly popular. First, it can be expensive. Secondly, it can disqualify you from certain awards and/or scholarships. A few people go every year I think, but just a few.

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2 hours ago, MedievalMan said:

Car insurance

Cheaper than other provinces? I didn't realize most people change their car insurance provider when they move provinces to go to school. Do they?

 

2 hours ago, MedievalMan said:

The scholarships are indeed unrivalled

Wow that is awesome. What would you estimate is the average gift per student? 

 

2 hours ago, MedievalMan said:

set to increase in the coming year

Is this increase going to kick in for the incoming class? Do you know how much of an increase that is?

 

2 hours ago, MedievalMan said:

Few students get legal jobs in Fredericton after first year, the city being rather small. It is a bit better in 2L summer, but many firms hire just articling students, not summer students.

What do students typically do for employment during their 1L and 2L summers then? Search for legal positions near their home? Find any job available to them? Travel? 

 

Thanks for your help! As for the apartments vs. EPJ argument and having a car... I'm not very good at "adulting" so having something where I don't need to buy furniture, move furniture across the country, and I can throw a rock at my classes and get to the gym easily are huge bonuses for me. I slummed it out for housing during undergrad, but now that I've worked for a short period of time after my degree I prefer something nicer. I haven't really noticed Fredricton having any sort of upscale, newer condo buildings... Is that accurate? I'd be coming from a big city where upscale condos are popping up left right and center so that feels like the norm

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On Scholarships: It’s hard to say what the average funding awarded per student is, since it depends on each students merit, ECs, etc. but last year at the awards ceremony they gave out over $500 000 in scholarships. The student population of Ludlow Hall is less than 300, so I’d say UNBs scholarship opportunities are very much unrivaled. 

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28 minutes ago, amylaw said:

On Scholarships: It’s hard to say what the average funding awarded per student is, since it depends on each students merit, ECs, etc. but last year at the awards ceremony they gave out over $500 000 in scholarships. The student population of Ludlow Hall is less than 300, so I’d say UNBs scholarship opportunities are very much unrivaled. 

By the time you strip out what the 9 Beaverbrook kids get it leaves only a little more than $1000 per student, would hardly say that is unrivaled. 

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5 hours ago, IrishStew said:

Cheaper than other provinces? I didn't realize most people change their car insurance provider when they move provinces to go to school. Do they?

Is this increase going to kick in for the incoming class? Do you know how much of an increase that is?

What do students typically do for employment during their 1L and 2L summers then? Search for legal positions near their home? Find any job available to them? Travel? 

I haven't really noticed Fredricton having any sort of upscale, newer condo buildings... Is that accurate? I'd be coming from a big city where upscale condos are popping up left right and center so that feels like the norm

Well, I used to live in Ontario, so it is certainly cheaper for me. Not sure where you are from, and what is the price difference between your home province and New Brunswick. Also, TD Insurance has a special discount for UNB students and alumni. Furthermore, if you do end up renting out in the town, you will probably need a tenant liability insurance, which can end up costing less than $150 per year, if you bundle it with your car insurance.

If you have a car, it would make sense to get a local driver's license, and once you get a local driver's license, you can definitely change your insurance location to Fredericton, and get the local rates. Quite a few people with cars eventually did just that.

Upscale condos... Not sure, honestly. I think there has been some new development on the North side of Fredericton - but that is not a convenient location relative to Ludlow. A few of Killam's buildings near the university - namely the Plaza and Forest Hill - look fairly new on the outside. Yet I do not know what their inside looks like. 

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On 2/18/2019 at 10:42 AM, clevermoose said:

By the time you strip out what the 9 Beaverbrook kids get it leaves only a little more than $1000 per student, would hardly say that is unrivaled. 

Definitely depends on allocation. Someone I was direct messaging told me they had heard from faculty that for someone with their stats (above average... I'd guess about 160 LSAT and mid-high gpa) they would get an average entrance scholarship of $5k. Completely anecdotal but that's sort of what I'm going on since there isn't much else.

The Beaverbrook is only for Maritimes students, right? My understanding is that that is basically a full scholarship.

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As someone who lived in EPJ for my first year, I just want to say that you should not underestimate the importance of having a flat walk to Ludlow. The UNB campus is on top of a hill that is legendary for how steep it is, and the Law building is right at the top of the hill. 

EPJ is a very good place to live. As someone who has spent t he last 6 years of my life living in various student accommodations, this is about as good as it gets if you want to live on campus. 

My impression was that there were not as many law students in the building as some people here think there were, but there is still alot. And everyone living in the building is a grad student, so theres not alot of partying going on in the building. 

You can pay for a parking spot right next to EPJ, i use to do it. And dont listen to the people who say you don't need a car if you live on campus. You need a car in Fredericton. This town is simply not transit accessible. 

The law faculty is very tight night, something I felt at the time and I have come to appreciate ever more ever since I transfered to a Toronto Law school. 

General consensus is that Dal grads have better job opportunities outside of Atlantic canada because more firms actually interview from Dal and Dal has a better reputation as being a "national" law school. 

Edited by shawniebear

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29 minutes ago, shawniebear said:

As someone who lived in EPJ for my first year, I just want to say that you should not underestimate the importance of having a flat walk to Ludlow. The UNB campus is on top of a hill that is legendary for how steep it is, and the Law building is right at the top of the hill. 

EPJ is a very good place to live. As someone who has spent t he last 6 years of my life living in various student accommodations, this is about as good as it gets if you want to live on campus. 

My impression was that there were not as many law students in the building as some people here think there were, but there is still alot. And everyone living in the building is a grad student, so theres not alot of partying going on in the building. 

You can pay for a parking spot right next to EPJ, i use to do it. And dont listen to the people who say you don't need a car if you live on campus. You need a car in Fredericton. This town is simply not transit accessible. 

The law faculty is very tight night, something I felt at the time and I have come to appreciate ever more ever since I transfered to a Toronto Law school. 

General consensus is that Dal grads have better job opportunities outside of Atlantic canada because more firms actually interview from Dal and Dal has a better reputation as being a "national" law school. 

It's hard to tell from online, but when you rent a room at EPJ, does it have a shared kitchen/living room with others? Or is it an all-inclusive suite where you open the door and everything you need to live alone is in one suite?

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2 hours ago, jkso said:

It's hard to tell from online, but when you rent a room at EPJ, does it have a shared kitchen/living room with others? Or is it an all-inclusive suite where you open the door and everything you need to live alone is in one suite?

Every apartment has 2-3 bedrooms with a shared living room, bathroom and kitchen. There is no guarantee that you will actually have roommates though, as I lived in a 3 bedroom suite by myself alone because there just wasn't high enough demand. Although I only moved in for the winter semester, and its likely that the building was full, or close it, for the first semester. 

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18 hours ago, IrishStew said:

The Beaverbrook is only for Maritimes students, right? My understanding is that that is basically a full scholarship.

No, it is not only for Maritime students - everyone is eligible. It is better than full scholarship - it is full tuition plus some money for living expenses. This year the tuition and fees were $12,000, so the scholarship was $18,000. However, they have already held interviews for it (the final stage of the process) last Friday, so if you were not there, you will not be getting it, unfortunately. 

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6 hours ago, MedievalMan said:

No, it is not only for Maritime students - everyone is eligible. It is better than full scholarship - it is full tuition plus some money for living expenses. This year the tuition and fees were $12,000, so the scholarship was $18,000. However, they have already held interviews for it (the final stage of the process) last Friday, so if you were not there, you will not be getting it, unfortunately. 

Are Beaverbrook scholarships given out on a yearly basis again to say, second year students?

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7 minutes ago, IrishStew said:

Are Beaverbrook scholarships given out on a yearly basis again to say, second year students?

No. They are renewable for three years (provided you maintain a certain average), but if you didn't get one upon admission, you will never be able to apply for it once you start law school.

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