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jklee1987

Does LSAT tutor/prep course really help??

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I was very skeptical about getting a tutor or taking prep courses, but after scoring 157 on all three attempts, now I feel like its the only way to raise my score

I was thinking about HarvardReady, but I still have this fundamental question that those course actually help you improve problem solving skills or just nothing more than giving you tons of problem sets to get you familiar with the question types and  styles. 

 

Any comment/thought/recommendation would be appreciated! 

 

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I took the course UBC offered for LSAT prep, and although I though it was helping and brought my PT to a 157, i ended up getting a worst score than i had last year. 

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When deciding to hire a tutor/enroll in a prep course, you ought to take into consideration your personal learning style.  How have you dealt with academic challenges in the past?  For myself, I thrive in situations where I can ask questions, get assistance from an instructor, and engage with my classmates.  So, I chose to take a LSAT prep course. 

In fact, I took the UBC course as well.  However, I have a completely different experience than georglucas.  I benefitted from the personalized study strategies, and the instructor's feedback and encouragement when my progress my stagnating. Yet, I also took advantage of the opportunities the course offered me.  For example, before and after each class, the instructor was available to answer questions. I sat through all of those sessions to both ask my own questions and listen to my classmates' questions.   

During two and a half months of fulltime study, I raised my score from a 148 to a 164.  In my experience, I improved my problem solving skills but, for another student, they may feel as if they were just receiving problem sets.  It all depends on your learning style.  

Regardless if you hire a tutor/enroll in a prep course, I would recommend reviewing your three attempts for patterns.  Best of luck! 

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Definitely agree with the above - make sure you take in your learning style.

I see it to often that students: a) are not realistic with their timelines b) underestimate the exam c) have wrong study habits. 

The LSAT is a process - its a marathon. If someone told you they'd like to lose 60lbs in two months - most folks would be like that is not realistic for obvious reasons. But what really takes place is that you are actually taking into account a) the persons timeline b) how fit they are c) their diet habits etc. Similarly, apply that with the LSAT.

With respect to Tutors - tutors can definitely help. You can use them as a study skill coach (which is HUGE) or for certain question types you are having difficulty with. But it solely depends on you. With courses - 7sage thus far with addition to the LSAT Trainer book is the best.

G'luck!  

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On 2/15/2019 at 11:56 AM, jklee1987 said:

I was thinking about HarvardReady, but I still have this fundamental question that those course actually help you improve problem solving skills or just nothing more than giving you tons of problem sets to get you familiar with the question types and  styles. 

Like the comments above suggest, the value you'll get out of a prep course depends a lot on your learning style. That being said, to answer your question directly, Harvard Ready does teach a particular method. The repetition just helps that method become muscle memory. 

If your golf swing is fundamentally flawed, no amount of repetition will fix it. Conversely, if an instructor teaches you how to improve your swing but you never practice the technique, you will not improve either.

I took Harvard Ready last summer and improved my score by 10 points. I highly recommend it. 

  

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You don't need a tutor. There are enough free resources around for you to figure out what your issues are and for you to correct them. 

For some people, a tutor can help. But I've also heard of people spending hundreds or even thousands of dollars on classes/tutors and achieving no improvement.

 

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I used 7sage to help study and it was quite useful. It was mostly good for helping with the timing and learning the tips and tricks. Additionally, as I was working almost full time and taking some courses on top of it, it was pretty manageable to do in my own time.

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I took an online course from Kaplan. My diagnostic score was a 148 and after a solid month of study with their instructors, materials, and questions I ended up with a 162. I can say with certainty that their style matched perfectly with how I study and what I was looking for in a study course. I promise I don't work for them and this isn't an ad, but echoing what was said above you really should do your research and look around to see what works. To answer your original question, yes a prep course/tutor absolutely will help if you pick the right one.

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