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Pazerudael

GPA calculation / Chances (four possibilities)

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Hey guys - trying to figure out my chances and GPA here. My degree is a bit convoluted. When U of A calculates GPA, does anyone know if they calculate A+ as 4.3, or if they only calculate it as 4.0? I'm aware that they cap the end result at 4.0, but not sure how the A+ is treated. I also made the mistake of taking two 100 level language courses within my last two years, but the Admission team told me that if my Faculty counts those as the language credits required by my degree instead of the original ones I took years ago, then they'll count them towards my last two years of classes despite not being senior-level courses. Of course, my Faculty is known for making mistakes on requests such as these, so I can't bank on them following through. 

As such, I have four potential GPAs I'm applying with:

4.04 / 155 [4.3 / language courses included]

3.92 / 155 [4.0 / language courses included]

3.77 / 155 [4.3 / language courses not included]

3.66 / 155 [4.0 / language courses not included]

I'm also finishing up two more courses this semester. I'm not sure if the U of A will count my winter courses, but if they do, then it doesn't matter whether or not the language courses are accounted for. 

 

Any thoughts on my chances with my convoluted GPA calculations?

 

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A+ is treated as 4.0 not 4.3, 

the 3.66/155 is a little low based on their applicant profiles. Lowest with that I think is a 158 and that’s cutting it

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22 minutes ago, bigfudge2017 said:

A+ is treated as 4.0 not 4.3, 

the 3.66/155 is a little low based on their applicant profiles. Lowest with that I think is a 158 and that’s cutting it

I would normally operate under the assumption that the 3.66/155 would be an immediate rejection. I'm surprised you so optimistically describe it as just "a little low," haha. The A+ ruling makes me sad; my A+ grades make up a massive portion of my GPA; it's frustrating to hear that the extra effort appears to go unrewarded. 

Based on the other stats, do you think I have a somewhat realistic chance of getting in?

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6 minutes ago, Pazerudael said:

I would normally operate under the assumption that the 3.66/155 would be an immediate rejection. I'm surprised you so optimistically describe it as just "a little low," haha. The A+ ruling makes me sad; my A+ grades make up a massive portion of my GPA; it's frustrating to hear that the extra effort appears to go unrewarded. 

Based on the other stats, do you think I have a somewhat realistic chance of getting in?

I don’t like to be overly negative 😁 plus sometimes miracles happen and I like to leave the door open for those. 

As for the rest, I think your chances get much much better with a 3.92/155! Are you waiting for the Jan lsat scores? Because with anything higher than 155 I’d say you’re a lock for admission. I got in with 3.6/163 for reference

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3 minutes ago, bigfudge2017 said:

I don’t like to be overly negative 😁 plus sometimes miracles happen and I like to leave the door open for those. 

As for the rest, I think your chances get much much better with a 3.92/155! Are you waiting for the Jan lsat scores? Because with anything higher than 155 I’d say you’re a lock for admission. I got in with 3.6/163 for reference

Gotta love them miracles! 

I'm not waiting on any LSAT scores. My 155 was the result of about two weeks of studying a couple of years ago - basically my diagnostic. If I don't get in this year, I'll gratefully be taking advantage of the extra year to pay off some debt and actually study for the LSAT. At this point, I'm trying to gauge whether or not I have a good enough chance of getting in that I should be making a conscious early effort in securing funding since I can't access student loans. Even if I get in, if I don't have the appropriate funding, acceptance doesn't matter. 

It seems I might just have to wait and see. :) Your words have certainly given me reason to hope - and to think more actively about my financial planning. 

BTW - congratulations on your acceptance! I wish you all the best in your studies. ^_^

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Does it specify on your transcripts that those language classes aren't part of your degree? Or do they just appear like any other class?

Chances are if your transcript doesn't specifically state that they are extra to your degree they will be counted. 

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Even if they arent part of your degree it seems to me like they could still be included?  I took 4 classes after I graduated as an "unclassified student" and these are used in my L20. 

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5 hours ago, AJD19 said:

Even if they arent part of your degree it seems to me like they could still be included?  I took 4 classes after I graduated as an "unclassified student" and these are used in my L20. 

If I'm not mistaken, the issue is more the level of the courses themselves (100 or 200 level) that may determine their eligibility for GPA calculations, not just when they were taken per se. 

Unless the courses you took after your degree were also lower level course in which case I will not pretend to know the unknowable ways of the U of A GPA calculation formula. ;) 

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11 hours ago, Pazerudael said:

Hey guys - trying to figure out my chances and GPA here. My degree is a bit convoluted. When U of A calculates GPA, does anyone know if they calculate A+ as 4.3, or if they only calculate it as 4.0? I'm aware that they cap the end result at 4.0, but not sure how the A+ is treated. I also made the mistake of taking two 100 level language courses within my last two years, but the Admission team told me that if my Faculty counts those as the language credits required by my degree instead of the original ones I took years ago, then they'll count them towards my last two years of classes despite not being senior-level courses. Of course, my Faculty is known for making mistakes on requests such as these, so I can't bank on them following through. 

As such, I have four potential GPAs I'm applying with:

4.04 / 155 [4.3 / language courses included]

3.92 / 155 [4.0 / language courses included]

3.77 / 155 [4.3 / language courses not included]

3.66 / 155 [4.0 / language courses not included]

I'm also finishing up two more courses this semester. I'm not sure if the U of A will count my winter courses, but if they do, then it doesn't matter whether or not the language courses are accounted for. 

 

Any thoughts on my chances with my convoluted GPA calculations?

 

UofA's GPA calculation counts most recent 20 courses.

If not including the two 100 level language courses do you still have 20 courses in your last 2 years?

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A 3.92 155 is pretty much a guaranteed acceptance, but a 3.66 155 is very likely a rejection, at best maybe a waitlist

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On 2/15/2019 at 10:10 AM, SufficientCondition said:

The last time I spoke to them regarding summer semester courses, they said “we will count the course towards your GPA as long as it counts towards a degree”. 

Exactly. 

Those junior level courses won't be counted unless my faculty flags them as my language credits. And if they don't, then that means instead of my 20 most recent classes being counted, it'll roll over and include an extra semester which happens to have a couple of C- grades. It's a huge impact and I'll be pretty sad if that's due to an administrative error. I'm literally taking two extra classes this semester just in case the faculty screws it up. 

---------

Ultimately, it looks like I just have to be patient. I appreciate everyone's assistance and input, and I hope you all succeed in your current law careers/law programs/law applications. 

Crossing my fingers for everyone!

 

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On 2/13/2019 at 7:33 AM, FairEnough said:

If I'm not mistaken, the issue is more the level of the courses themselves (100 or 200 level) that may determine their eligibility for GPA calculations, not just when they were taken per se. 

Unless the courses you took after your degree were also lower level course in which case I will not pretend to know the unknowable ways of the U of A GPA calculation formula. ;) 

It is definitely true that classes taken after you have already obtained your degree, as an unclassified student, must be upper level to be considered. However, I have lower level (100 and 200 level) classes taken in my fourth year that counted in my L2. I could be wrong, but i was thinking if lower level classes taken anytime during your degree are counted, and if classes completely unrelated to a degree can also be used, perhaps the language classes OP took may be counted.

Edited by AJD19

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4 minutes ago, Pazerudael said:

Just got my acceptance letter! I'm guessing that means they calculated my GPA with my language courses!

Congratulations!

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