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Mandy555

Why did you pick UofT over Osgoode?

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3 minutes ago, sf20 said:

I don't have a lot to add, but I was in the same position as you really recently where I was set on going to Osgoode but then I started to change my mind. If you haven't already, go see both schools and talk to some students who currently go there to get an idea of what the school environment is like. I feel like actually talking to someone in person is a really great way to gain some perspective on what the schools are like and it definitely helped me feel more certain about where I wanted to go! 

In terms of interests, I'm in the same boat, where I think I know what some of my interests might be, but I'm not entirely sure and I'm willing to keep an open mind. For me personally, Osgoode seems better in terms of its variety of courses, clinics and experiential opportunities, but UofT seems like the better school in all other areas (again, this is just my own personal opinion). At the same time, UofT does offer some external programs and clinics that fit some of my interests so I came to the conclusion that despite UofT not having such a large variety of courses and clinics like Osgoode, the pros of going to UofT still outweighed the pros of going to Osgoode. 

Of course everyone is different and for you, the pros of going to Osgoode may completely outweigh the pros of going to UofT, especially if UofT doesn't really offer much opportunity for the kind of law you want to pursue. It really just depends on what you're looking for. Hopefully my decision making process seems reasonable and helpful, otherwise I have some more thinking to do as well! 😂

Thanks so much! I think your decision making process seems very reasonable and your advice is really helpful. I actually haven't really been focusing on weighing the pros of each school, I've mainly been comparing the cons which isn't really that helpful considering that they're both great schools! 

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19 hours ago, Mandy555 said:

If you don’t mind me asking, how did it affect you? 

Can't speak for the other poster, but I also attended Osgoode during a strike (during second semester of 3L). 

Law school classes, with the exception of one or two, ran as normal. However, there were a fair amount of students who didn't necessarily feel comfortable crossing a picket line. Effectively, each student had to make a decision of whether they wanted to continue classes as normal or opt-into an alternative structure where their coursework would resume when the strike ended. At the very least, this meant some added stress of deciding what option to take, as well as some uncertainty. As a 3L at the time, many of my classmates were worried that the strike would impact articling or when they'd write the bar exams. 

I was taking a lot of labour and employment courses at the time, and as I'm sure you can imagine, many of my professors weren't exactly keen on crossing picket lines themselves. I did have two courses in which we were given the option of continuing to participate through an online platform. 

I don't regret going to Osgoode and would happily enrol again - the whole strike was a bit of a headache, but didn't ruin my semester or anything like that. Still, it may be something worth considering. 

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5 hours ago, ghoulzrulez said:

Can't speak for the other poster, but I also attended Osgoode during a strike (during second semester of 3L). 

Law school classes, with the exception of one or two, ran as normal. However, there were a fair amount of students who didn't necessarily feel comfortable crossing a picket line. Effectively, each student had to make a decision of whether they wanted to continue classes as normal or opt-into an alternative structure where their coursework would resume when the strike ended. At the very least, this meant some added stress of deciding what option to take, as well as some uncertainty. As a 3L at the time, many of my classmates were worried that the strike would impact articling or when they'd write the bar exams. 

I was taking a lot of labour and employment courses at the time, and as I'm sure you can imagine, many of my professors weren't exactly keen on crossing picket lines themselves. I did have two courses in which we were given the option of continuing to participate through an online platform. 

I don't regret going to Osgoode and would happily enrol again - the whole strike was a bit of a headache, but didn't ruin my semester or anything like that. Still, it may be something worth considering. 

I'm not really familiar with how uni strikes work. I understand that most undergrad classes were affected but what about some of the campus services (libraries, food places, etc.)? Was everything closed?

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15 minutes ago, sf20 said:

I'm not really familiar with how uni strikes work. I understand that most undergrad classes were affected but what about some of the campus services (libraries, food places, etc.)? Was everything closed?

During the strike I was referring to, the particular unit that was on strike (CUPE 3903) represented contract faculty, and teaching/research/graduate assistants. This did impact 1L classes, as one of the mandatory courses is taught largely by graduate assistants. 

Osgoode's library was operating as regular, as were the admin office. I believe the majority of food outlets, at least those close to the Osgoode part of campus, were still open - as I recall, the one or two that closed did so because of reduced traffic/business on campus (a number of students were participating in classes remotely), not because they were directly involved in the strike … but don't quote me on that. 

Edited by ghoulzrulez
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3 hours ago, ghoulzrulez said:

During the strike I was referring to, the particular unit that was on strike (CUPE 3903) represented contract faculty, and teaching/research/graduate assistants. This did impact 1L classes, as one of the mandatory courses is taught largely by graduate assistants. 

Osgoode's library was operating as regular, as were the admin office. I believe the majority of food outlets, at least those close to the Osgoode part of campus, were still open - as I recall, the one or two that closed did so because of reduced traffic/business on campus (a number of students were participating in classes remotely), not because they were directly involved in the strike … but don't quote me on that. 

was that the 2018 strike or 2015?

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So I'm in the exact same boat as you (originally dead set on Osgoode but then an unexpected acceptance from U of T changed everything) and I thought I'd share my decision making process if it may be of any help to you or anyone else on here!

The way I see it, there are enormous pros to both schools and at the end of the day you truly can't go wrong with either one. So when I found myself comparing pros, I just kept confusing myself more. I honestly do not feel equipped to commit to a certain direction of law at this point, which makes it even harder for me to pick the school that I feel will provide me with the most opportunities for my needs and interests. For that reason, I've decided to make a list of which areas of law where I reasonably feel like I would be disadvantaged by going to U of T over Osgoode. While it may be hard to narrow down my interests because I have so many, I find it so much easier to know what I don't like. It really helps put it into perspective that there are so many opportunities at both schools, but if you feel like Osgoode would only potentially disadvantage you on topics you don't even like, then it makes your choice of going to U of T so much easier! 

When I did this myself, I realized that while Osgoode might have more clinical/experiential opportunities, the areas where I feel like they have a leg up over U of T are just not areas that I'm interested in. For this reason, I'm personally leaning towards U of T just because I know I would be much happier living downtown and they also have so many amazing opportunities that I'm interested in! Obviously I'm going to wait until I go to both of the welcome days and probably do a bit more research, but that's my current thought process. However, this might be totally different for you if you feel like the areas where Osgoode can provide more opportunity are areas that you are interested in, and if I was in that position, it's something I would seriously consider.

I'm not sure if this helps, but I hope it does! Good luck with your decision making :) 

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8 hours ago, e0813 said:

So I'm in the exact same boat as you (originally dead set on Osgoode but then an unexpected acceptance from U of T changed everything) and I thought I'd share my decision making process if it may be of any help to you or anyone else on here!

The way I see it, there are enormous pros to both schools and at the end of the day you truly can't go wrong with either one. So when I found myself comparing pros, I just kept confusing myself more. I honestly do not feel equipped to commit to a certain direction of law at this point, which makes it even harder for me to pick the school that I feel will provide me with the most opportunities for my needs and interests. For that reason, I've decided to make a list of which areas of law where I reasonably feel like I would be disadvantaged by going to U of T over Osgoode. While it may be hard to narrow down my interests because I have so many, I find it so much easier to know what I don't like. It really helps put it into perspective that there are so many opportunities at both schools, but if you feel like Osgoode would only potentially disadvantage you on topics you don't even like, then it makes your choice of going to U of T so much easier! 

When I did this myself, I realized that while Osgoode might have more clinical/experiential opportunities, the areas where I feel like they have a leg up over U of T are just not areas that I'm interested in. For this reason, I'm personally leaning towards U of T just because I know I would be much happier living downtown and they also have so many amazing opportunities that I'm interested in! Obviously I'm going to wait until I go to both of the welcome days and probably do a bit more research, but that's my current thought process. However, this might be totally different for you if you feel like the areas where Osgoode can provide more opportunity are areas that you are interested in, and if I was in that position, it's something I would seriously consider.

I'm not sure if this helps, but I hope it does! Good luck with your decision making :) 

Thanks so much! That's super helpful and a great way to look at it! Good luck to you too! 

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On 2/11/2019 at 1:06 PM, Mandy555 said:

Thanks for all your advice! It’s definitely reassuring to hear a perspective from someone who chose Osgoode over UofT. I’ll take some time to do more research and probably some time off this forum! 

My daughter is a 1L at Osgoode this year. She was accepted to both U of T and Osgoode, but chose Osgoode for the reasons Deadpool mentioned, greater opportunities to work in clinics and experiential education.

Even though a higher percentage of the U of T class may end up on Bay, that stat alone does not prove a cause and effect. 

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I started off dead set on Osgoode for the clinics, but ended up choosing U of T for a combination of:

  • Location - I prefer to live in a walkable neighborhood closer to school
  • Financial aid - I was able to get more from U of T than from Osgoode and it eliminated the tuition difference
  • Co-curricular - Available clinic opportunities were in my areas of interest
  • Community - this wasn't part of why I chose the school, but it is a reason I would recommend it to others - I've found it to be a really positive, collaborative atmosphere, where everyone is genuinely "into" learning about the law.
  • Alumni network - I can't compare this to Osgoode, but I've always found that U of T grads are very willing to talk to and help out a student seeking career/school/life advice

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10 hours ago, Demander said:

I started off dead set on Osgoode for the clinics, but ended up choosing U of T for a combination of:

  • Location - I prefer to live in a walkable neighborhood closer to school
  • Financial aid - I was able to get more from U of T than from Osgoode and it eliminated the tuition difference
  • Co-curricular - Available clinic opportunities were in my areas of interest
  • Community - this wasn't part of why I chose the school, but it is a reason I would recommend it to others - I've found it to be a really positive, collaborative atmosphere, where everyone is genuinely "into" learning about the law.
  • Alumni network - I can't compare this to Osgoode, but I've always found that U of T grads are very willing to talk to and help out a student seeking career/school/life advice

How do you know how much you can get from Osgoode?

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On 2/16/2019 at 8:41 AM, Luckycharm said:

How do you know how much you can get from Osgoode?

I inquired with similarly situated students, and I looked around on their website. Maybe if they had a calculator like U of T, my estimate would be different, but even in hindsight, I'm glad I chose U of T because of the community, opportunities I've enjoyed, and location. 

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32 minutes ago, Demander said:

I inquired with similarly situated students, and I looked around on their website. Maybe if they had a calculator like U of T, my estimate would be different, but even in hindsight, I'm glad I chose U of T because of the community, opportunities I've enjoyed, and location. 

That means your choice had nothing to do with finance.

 

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9 hours ago, Luckycharm said:
9 hours ago, Demander said:

I inquired with similarly situated students, and I looked around on their website. Maybe if they had a calculator like U of T, my estimate would be different, but even in hindsight, I'm glad I chose U of T because of the community, opportunities I've enjoyed, and location. 

That means your choice had nothing to do with finance.

To clarify, finance was one of several considerations. Since Osgoode doesn't have an aid calculator, I compared the amount U of T's calculator estimated I would get against what I guessed I would get from Osgoode. I informed my Osgoode guess by asking Osgoode students with similar wealth to my own what they were getting, and also by looking at the website. 

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2 hours ago, Demander said:

To clarify, finance was one of several considerations. Since Osgoode doesn't have an aid calculator, I compared the amount U of T's calculator estimated I would get against what I guessed I would get from Osgoode. I informed my Osgoode guess by asking Osgoode students with similar wealth to my own what they were getting, and also by looking at the website. 

"similar wealth to my own what they were getting"

Do they also have similar available resources, expenses, accumulated educational debts and personal reasons.......

"The primary criterion for receipt of a bursary is financial need. Decisions are made based on a variety of considerations, including available resources, expenses, accumulated educational debt and personal factors, including medical and familial circumstances.

 

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4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

"similar wealth to my own what they were getting"

Do they also have similar available resources, expenses, accumulated educational debts and personal reasons.......

"The primary criterion for receipt of a bursary is financial need. Decisions are made based on a variety of considerations, including available resources, expenses, accumulated educational debt and personal factors, including medical and familial circumstances.

 

Why are you getting so worked up over this? It's fine that he or she made a financial "guestimate" based on what they thought they may receive from Osgoode. It's only one of the factors that played into their decision. Life is full of uncertainty so people have to take their chances along the way. 

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1 hour ago, Deadpool said:

Why are you getting so worked up over this? It's fine that he or she made a financial "guestimate" based on what they thought they may receive from Osgoode. It's only one of the factors that played into their decision. Life is full of uncertainty so people have to take their chances along the way. 

I won't careless why she decided to go where.

I want to point out that U of T costs more than OZ even after Bursaries.  

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4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

I want to point out that U of T costs more than OZ even after Bursaries

That depends on your financial situation - it also depends on things like your cost of living. Again, as I said above, finance was one of several considerations for me and U of T satisfied my concerns in that area. Cheers.

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