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Law school attire

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Prepping for 1L - should I be buying any specific "nice" clothing? Do people care what you wear to class? Do you need "court clothing" whatever that would be.

In undergrad I wore sweats basically lol

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Normal clothes. 

Buy one suit just in case you need it for a career services event. 

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Continue wearing sweats. Nobody gives a hoot. But you should have some business attire for networking events. Maybe something business casual for less formal networking events.

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2 hours ago, NFLDFree said:

Prepping for 1L - should I be buying any specific "nice" clothing? Do people care what you wear to class? Do you need "court clothing" whatever that would be.

In undergrad I wore sweats basically lol

You can wear sweats to class most of the time. Most people dress casually - jeans, leggings, sweats, hoodies, T-shirts, etc. You will almost certainly need at least one suit for interviews, clinic appearances in court/before tribunals (probably not so much in 1L), going to meetings with lawyers, receptions etc. but you would not wear a suit to class unless you had something like that right after class or you were doing a presentation to a visiting lawyer or something. You will probably need suits in the upper years more than in 1L, so starting with one is probably ok, and you may want to add more suits, or shirts/ties/blouses/accessories, as you go on in your studies and as you can afford them. 

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1 hour ago, providence said:

You can wear sweats to class most of the time. Most people dress casually - jeans, leggings, sweats, hoodies, T-shirts, etc. You will almost certainly need at least one suit for interviews, clinic appearances in court/before tribunals (probably not so much in 1L), going to meetings with lawyers, receptions etc. but you would not wear a suit to class unless you had something like that right after class or you were doing a presentation to a visiting lawyer or something. You will probably need suits in the upper years more than in 1L, so starting with one is probably ok, and you may want to add more suits, or shirts/ties/blouses/accessories, as you go on in your studies and as you can afford them. 

Are lawyers and law schools "pretentious" when it comes to attire? For example, if I go to an interview in a $100 suit vs. a custom suit am I being judged? Or is it normal to just have a basic suit?

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8 minutes ago, NFLDFree said:

Are lawyers and law schools "pretentious" when it comes to attire? For example, if I go to an interview in a $100 suit vs. a custom suit am I being judged? Or is it normal to just have a basic suit?

Not all that many people can tell the difference (if they are both wool...) and those that can will understand that you are a student and not expected to dress in a bespoke suit.

Get something you can afford and that fits well.

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3 hours ago, NFLDFree said:

Are lawyers and law schools "pretentious" when it comes to attire? For example, if I go to an interview in a $100 suit vs. a custom suit am I being judged? Or is it normal to just have a basic suit?

This may be obvious, but if anything you should get your suit fitted. I was at a mixer event a few months ago (1L) and a student had pants so long that he was stepping on them. I'm pretty sure they were unhemmed. You'll look better in a cheap, fitted suit than an expensive one off the rack without alterations.

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3 hours ago, NFLDFree said:

Are lawyers and law schools "pretentious" when it comes to attire? For example, if I go to an interview in a $100 suit vs. a custom suit am I being judged? Or is it normal to just have a basic suit?

Just make sure that it fits well. Lawyers will know that you're a student, but it isn't pretentious to expect a suit to fit well.

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3 hours ago, NFLDFree said:

Are lawyers and law schools "pretentious" when it comes to attire? For example, if I go to an interview in a $100 suit vs. a custom suit am I being judged? Or is it normal to just have a basic suit?

I'd be surprised if anyone had a $100 suit that didn't look like a shiny Le Chateau sale rack prom suit. So tread carefully with your wallet. How you appear in an interview is important. Nobody cares what brand of suit or clothing you wear if you look splendid. But if you look like shit, it isn't pretentious to judge whatever decisions went into dressing like that for a job interview.

 

Edited by FineCanadianFXs
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16 minutes ago, FineCanadianFXs said:

I'd be surprised if anyone had a $100 suit that didn't look like a shiny Le Chateau sale rack prom suit. So tread carefully with your wallet. How you appear in an interview is important. Nobody cares what brand of suit or clothing you wear if you look splendid. But if you look like shit, it isn't pretentious to judge whatever decisions went into dressing for a job interview.

 

I paid about $87.00 for my favourite suit -- it looks great, fits great, and has held up to several dry cleanings. But it was marked down by a lot at the Sears liquidation sale. Otherwise, I agree that for $100.00, you can expect to look like Don Cherry after an expensive divorce. In my mind, a cheap suit is closer to $200.00 - $400.00. 

The other issue with buying an ultra cheap suit is quality. Even if the material looks okay at first, cheap suits won't last that long. Polyester blends, fused linings, and machine stitching don't hold up that well over time. I bought another cheap suit and after a couple of trips to the dry cleaner, it's fraying and falling apart. So even if you save some money now, you might end up spending the savings on a replacement in a year or two. 

Edited by realpseudonym
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19 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

I paid about $87.00 for my favourite suit -- it looks great, fits great, and has held up to several dry cleanings. But it was marked down by a lot at the Sears liquidation sale. Otherwise, I agree that for $100.00, you can expect to look like Don Cherry after an expensive divorce. In my mind, a cheap suit is closer to $200.00 - $400.00. 

The suit I get the most compliments on comprised one half of a BOGO where the other suit was $150 (and both on clearance, so $75 a pop).

Anyway, it's one thing to be informed enough on fashion and have the tools and confidence to find great deals. But my alarm bells go off when I see "pretentious" and "being judged" in an interview setting combined with an assumption that a basic suit costs $100 (actually, my most "basic suit"--the one I save for important meetings, interviews, or wear to court--is also my most expensive suit). 

Edited by FineCanadianFXs

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4 hours ago, FineCanadianFXs said:

I'd be surprised if anyone had a $100 suit that didn't look like a shiny Le Chateau sale rack prom suit. So tread carefully with your wallet. How you appear in an interview is important. Nobody cares what brand of suit or clothing you wear if you look splendid. But if you look like shit, it isn't pretentious to judge whatever decisions went into dressing like that for a job interview.

 

The Bay often does a Bay Day sales event (once or twice a year) where you can get a $300 Calvin Klein suit from anywhere from $100-$150. Quality is pretty decent though they're not the most fashion forward suits usually, but will look pretty good after alternations. 

 

Source: I used to work for the Bay

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Most people aren't in sweats, outside of exam time.  I would say that jeans are the most common.  However, I don't think people would think twice if you were in sweats. 

It isn't really pretentious to expect that people aren't dressed in a completely crap suit.  Watch out for sales and you will be able to get something decent.  Or, better yet, have your mom watch out for sales...moms love that shit.  

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Yeah, I don't think I've seen anyone in sweats really, other than exam time in the library. People seem to dress a little nicer than they did in undergrad - less graphic tees and ripped jeans, more chinos and button ups. Not that it really matters all that much. 

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8 hours ago, doodlebug said:

The Bay often does a Bay Day sales event (once or twice a year) where you can get a $300 Calvin Klein suit from anywhere from $100-$150. Quality is pretty decent though they're not the most fashion forward suits usually, but will look pretty good after alternations. 

Very true, the Bay can be terrific for deals. 

Still, one has to be careful there. The Bay also sells a few brands at that price point which look like shiny garbage or your make you look like you're wearing your dad's suit. 

Let me be clearer though since everyone including me seems to have a "but I've got a wicked cheap suit" story: I'd be surprised if a suit that cost between $100-150, at its full or less than 50% sale pricedidn't look like hot garbage.

Edited by FineCanadianFXs

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4 minutes ago, iheartbooks said:

Do not wear your suit to the first day of school, and do not announce that you will be your year's gold medalist. 

Excellent advice. 

Bay Days are just great, I grabbed my second suit during a fortuitously-timed Bay Days right before in-firms this fall. 50% off and under $400. I am fortunate that a decent Calvin Klein number fits me off the rack every time with only a bit of hemming required. 

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Just now, easttowest said:

and do not announce that you will be your year's gold medalist. 

…..and do not declare that you will crush anyone who stands in your way.   Someone actually said that in my first year.   It didn't go over very well.  🤢

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