Jump to content
elliniagreenslime

Those who are in Law School..did you ever regret it?

Recommended Posts

Regretted it even before I started.  Seeing in August that I had to get up at 7-7:30 AM five days a week made me want to drop out and not become anything close to an adult.  

Seriously, I haven't and don't actually know of anyone who has regretted the decision.  But I'm only a 1L, so that'll probably change in the next 2.5 years.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not yet as of 5ish months into 1L. 

I don’t know what factors might make someone regret being in law school. Stress might be one. There were moments during Dec. exams when I wondered how I’d get through what seemed like an insurmountable amount of material, but I did and so did my classmates and I’d say we emerged stronger and closer to one another afterwards.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not personally. Honestly, I'm struggling to think of reasons why one would regret law school. Maybe if you had a C average and were concerned about career prospects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, harveyspecter993 said:

Not personally. Honestly, I'm struggling to think of reasons why one would regret law school. Maybe if you had a C average and were concerned about career prospects.

Even if you have a C average, you’ll eventually get licensed. Finding an articling position might be more difficult but it’s certainly not going to be impossible. It’s true you’ll likely not get a coveted biglaw job or anything like that, but you’ll still be a lawyer. 

As for OP’s question: The only thing I’m not crazy about was the cost of law school. But I wouldn’t say I have any regrets. Having a legal education is pretty valuable, as well as are the connections you make through school. Assuming you complete the process (I.e., get licensed), it will pretty much always be an asset to be a lawyer even if you end up not practicing. At least, in many alternative career paths, like management, business, public service, and the like. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, elliniagreenslime said:

When and why?

If not, what were the most common reasons you've seen your peers talk about?

I'm a few years of out law school now, but I'll admit there were times while in law school that I questioned my decision.

During articles, there were moments when you might even say I regretted the decision to be a lawyer. (Mostly on Sunday nights when I was jamming out a research memo on some esoteric topic and eating awful take out, while getting paid shit all to do so, and without certainty of a hire back.)

I think a good number of my peers regretted law school or at least openly questioned their decision; the regret mostly swirled around the cost, job prospects (for ppl with low grades, ppl who were picky, or ppl who for whatever reason don't interview well), and the fact that articles and the first few years of practice are a real grind.

Nowadays, I never regret that I went to law school. I don't know what I'd be doing otherwise, but I suspect I wouldn't be as happy with my lot in life.

Edited by conge
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was one of the best decisions I have ever made. 

I think those who regret it either fall into two buckets:

1. They don't like practicing law (the actual subject matter or the time commitment required); or

2. They  are generally concerned about the cost of law school and are frustrated/anxious about paying that debt back because they either are not drawn to practices that pay the top of the scale, or they have difficulty obtaining those positions.

Remember, the majority of lawyers do not make "huge amounts of money" and when you are saddled with $100K+ in debt practicing in a position that you either do not love, or you feel you are not paid enough to do, dissatisfaction and regret are likely to ensue.

For myself - I feel like I finally found a job where I can use every part of my brain. It's challenging, it requires a good scientific knowledge, an ability to teach, an ability to write well and a good understanding of the law.  It allows for intellectual discourse. At the end of the day I feel valued and proud. It took me a while (and several other "careers") before finding this path, but now that I'm on it I can't think of any other job I'd rather have. Not everyone feels that way when they get out the other side - but man am I happy I do. 

Edited by TheScientist101
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No way. Especially at UofT. I do, however, regret not better preparing myself for the immense amount of work it requires. I have bad habits I still need to rid myself of. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do regret not trying to live in another country for a year since it is something I always wanted to do and being in law means I might not ever get a chance to do that. But I would never say I regret it, I love law school and it's definitely made me a stronger person.

 

I agree with others saying that the financial aspect is often what leads people to have regrets. I took a decent amount of time off between undergrad and law school to save money to cover the cost of living and tuition. As someone whose family always had to worry about money, I am very scared of debt. I do think I might have regretted law school if I had not taken the time to work and build up sufficient savings for myself.

 

Most of my peers who regret law school were the ones who saw it as graduate school, not as professional school and are frustrated that law school is not as esoteric and theoretical as a Masters program would be.

 

The other ones who regret it are the ones who thought jobs would be guaranteed or did not realize exactly how much lawyers work.

 

My advice to anyone who is still in undergrad and is not 100% sure about law school is to take a couple years off to work and travel. It will give you the basis for comparison you need in order to decide if you really want to go to law school or not. Also, try to see if you can take a lawyer or even a law student for coffee to hear about their experiences to see if law school is something you would enjoy.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second semester of 1L at UofA

I have no regrets so far.

- I genuinely enjoy the majority of the material that I'm studying. I suspect this part will get even better in 2L when I have some power as to the class selection. On days where I have to spend a significant portion of the my time studying I do not dread it like I did in undergraduate where the majority of my classes were either useless or uninteresting.

- I'm enjoying the extra curricular activities that come with law school so far. There are some I'm looking forward to in 2L and 3L too.

- I had a strong performance overall on my 1L midterms which has reduced my anxiety significantly when it comes to my prospects of getting a job.

- I'm not Big Law or bust which reduces my stress. There are numerous small and medium firms that I would consider equally (or more) appealing than Big Law. My main issue is that there are so many areas of law that I find appealing that I am likely not sufficiently directing my focus towards any particular area.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A girl in my class dropped out after a couple of months of 1L.  I never heard the full story, but she apparently decided it wasn't for her.  These things happen.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To go a little against the grain of the rest of the responses here, I would say that at the very least I regret not looking into other post-undergrad options in more detail before deciding on law school. From a purely financial perspective, if I had pursued consulting or banking straight out of undergrad (from which I graduated debt-free), I'd be in a much better position than I am now at age 25 with > $100k in debt and essentially zero income over the past three years. Even with a good articling position secured, the foregone earnings and level of debt I've accumulated I think will delay a lot of the near-term major life events (e.g. saving for a wedding, a down payment, investments, etc.). I definitely enjoyed my summer of actually working in a law firm after 2L, but it's hard to say whether I enjoy it any more than I would have consulting or banking. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2019 at 9:14 PM, realpseudonym said:

You joke, but a lot of it depends on the results and experiences that come with law school. I think "TheScientist101" hit the nail on the head above: being saddled with debt and not making enough money to pay that down stinks. Worst of all, you can be a perfectly intelligent, hard-working, and capable law student or lawyer and still wind up with nothing.

A few of the positive comments in here are from 1Ls, and if you rewound the clock and asked me what I thought of law school at the end of 1L, I would be singing a similar tune. However, once the doors of opportunity start closing, the stark reality that law school is and always will be a business-first become apparent.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had concerns before law school about whether it was right for me, but now that I'm past the half-way point I can say that I've enjoyed all of it. However, I am also acutely aware that I am in a place of privilege in that my parents are able to pay my tuition/living expenses and that I'll graduate with 0 debt. It's a lot easier to enjoy school when you're not concerned about finances.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Grey said:

To go a little against the grain of the rest of the responses here, I would say that at the very least I regret not looking into other post-undergrad options in more detail before deciding on law school. From a purely financial perspective, if I had pursued consulting or banking straight out of undergrad (from which I graduated debt-free), I'd be in a much better position than I am now at age 25 with > $100k in debt and essentially zero income over the past three years. Even with a good articling position secured, the foregone earnings and level of debt I've accumulated I think will delay a lot of the near-term major life events (e.g. saving for a wedding, a down payment, investments, etc.). I definitely enjoyed my summer of actually working in a law firm after 2L, but it's hard to say whether I enjoy it any more than I would have consulting or banking. 

As a 3L this sums up my feelings exactly. I'm always slightly jealous of my banking/consulting friends who have their life so much more together by now. They have financial security, they have their own places, their relationships are more stable. I don't regret law school but I wish I wouldn't have chosen it so quickly. 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to echo previous comments, I don't think people tend to regret it, unless you haven't found articling by graduation and even then there are options. That being said, I am sure everyone has moments where they think "why didn't I just do (anything else)". Before law school people have no idea the kind of sacrifices you make. You have less time with family, romantic relationships get destroyed because of the pressures/long distance (and other reasons, which I won't get into here) and an extremely competitive atmosphere. And as others have said, you also see your non-law school friends often doing very, very well. Sure law school is a bummer, but you gotta push through.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I regret the timing. I'm only in 1L but I feel like I would  have enjoyed law school more and got involved in more extracurricular activities if I took another 1-2 years off to work and travel. There are so many cool things I want to be involved in but I'm too burned out at the moment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • No ideal situation? Getting an acceptance anytime before May seems pretty damn ideal. You seem to be making some pretty bold assumptions, especially from a place where not many students are (or maybe I'm truly blind to the type of kids that end up at law school). Being able to move back to your parents place (maybe not so bold an assumption, but definitely not a reality for everyone), a car and no student loans... Cmon dude.
    • @Another Hutzmade solid points in another post that has relevance here. It's best to go to law school in the same province where you want to work.  This is because laws do differ between provinces, so you generally want to learn the law you'll practice, and it's far easier to obtain articles when living in the city you want to work in.  It's easier to attend events, make connections, etc. I'm no employer but seeing UVic undergrad + UVic law school is not unusual.  There's a bunch of UBC undergrad + UBC law school resumes out there.  Having a unique educational history may be an interesting topic of conversation or possibly relevant to the work it self, but it's not necessary.  People choose schools for many different reasons, e.g. family, friends, opportunities, having roots, specialization, etc.   "Mixing it up a bit and trying something new" is all well and good as long as it doesn't make it significantly harder to get to where you want to go. .
    • You both were insulting and rude from the beginning. Implying that us wanting to make an informed decision and not rush into anything means we would not succeed in law or law school is an insult.  This thread is going so off topic. It was about trying to see who hadn't had their file evaluated at Western. Lets stick to that. If you want to have your debate on whether you can move cities to attend law school in a week, make your own thread. 
    • Biglaw's problem (well, not exclusively big law), especially as a more junior associate, is always a general lack of predictability. Client decides late Thursday they want random request by Monday. Guess who has to rearrange weekend plans to get it done? (Hint, usually not the higher ups on the file). I think Ottawa has a good number of gov't and tribunal options. Obviously depends on your area of interest. Not too sure on in house, may be somewhat more limited with lots of larger companies being based out of the GTA. 
    • Accepted today. 3.37, 161
×
×
  • Create New...