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So, this year I applied to the U of S and McGill having completed two years of undergrad courses (after this semester, I'll have completed 26 courses total). I haven't heard back from McGill but I got into U of S law. If I were to go to the U of S, I would not have to finish my degree (or at least another year of it) and I would save at least $7000 on tuition alone. I would graduate two years earlier and would be able to begin my career earlier than if I waited. Also, my parents live in Sask and I would be able to visit them much easier than if I went to school elsewhere. However, the U of S is not my first choice school. I wouldn't be heartbroken or anything if I ended up going there but my first choice is McGill. However, I haven't been accepted to McGill and, assuming I eventually got into McGill, I'd likely have to complete my degree beforehand which would mean 1.5 more years of undergrad. This would cost like $10,000 in tuition at least. Also, given that I would get into school at least one year later and McGill law takes 4 years rather than 3, I would be starting my career at least two years later than if I had gone to the U of S. Anybody have any advice? Also, my LSAT is a 167 and GPA is a 3.85 in case that has any bearing on anything. 

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7 minutes ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

Wait until you hear back from McGill before worrying.

Where do you want to wind up practicing?  And how is your French?

French is decent. Went to french immersion elementary, took multiple french courses in high school and university, and I'm likely going to finish with a minor in French if I finish my degree. I'd prefer to practice in Montreal but wouldn't mind Saskatoon or Calgary either. 

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McGill is unlikely to admit candidates who won't be finished their bachelor's degree at the time of starting their law degree. Even with your solid stats I don't see you getting in now. 

There's a utility to having an undergrad. And it'll help you perform better at law school because it develops your thinking further. I get the cost argument but I legimately think you're better off waiting a year and applying more broadly to schools.

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11 minutes ago, RickyBubbles01 said:

French is decent. Went to french immersion elementary, took multiple french courses in high school and university, and I'm likely going to finish with a minor in French if I finish my degree. I'd prefer to practice in Montreal but wouldn't mind Saskatoon or Calgary either. 

If you want to practice in Montreal, go to McGill. If I were you, I would wait until I was required to put the seat deposit down at uSask and see if you got into McGill. If you haven't by that point, you can always pay the deposit and then withdraw later (provided you decide to attend law school this year). 

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22 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

McGill is unlikely to admit candidates who won't be finished their bachelor's degree at the time of starting their law degree. Even with your solid stats I don't see you getting in now. 

There's a utility to having an undergrad. And it'll help you perform better at law school because it develops your thinking further. I get the cost argument but I legimately think you're better off waiting a year and applying more broadly to schools.

Yeah, I figured it was a long shot. I've also got mediocre at best ECs and LORs. Idk if my thinking is going to develop much in a year though. I've already crushed through just about all my required classes and would largely just be taking easy electives to boost my GPA. I think I am leaning towards finishing my degree though. 

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27 minutes ago, Bolieve said:

If you want to practice in Montreal, go to McGill. If I were you, I would wait until I was required to put the seat deposit down at uSask and see if you got into McGill. If you haven't by that point, you can always pay the deposit and then withdraw later (provided you decide to attend law school this year). 

I'll probably put the seat deposit down just to buy myself more time to decide. I don't think I've got the best chances at McGill this cycle. 

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I remember being really keen to try and chase law after second year of undergrad. And I don't remember who it was specifically, but someone in my life way more experienced in the world of academia and law made the point to me that rushing through school to be the youngest person won't necessarily be an asset. That completely contradicted everything I had figured, I had figured getting in after two and being super young with nothing else in my life except for work would make me a glowing candidate. They offered an account quite the opposite. As compelling of a candidate as you may be being young and ahead of your peers (relatively that is), they offered the position that the oldest people in your class would likely get the job before you. People with responsibilities: family or finances to look after work more responsibly simply out of survival. Where younger people, such as yourself if you take the acceptance at UofS, you'll be done when you're super young, which makes you accomplished and educated which is ultimately the goal, but in terms of playing the long game it may not be your best best decision. Especially if UofS truly isn't your first choice. There'd be no harm in doing a three year, or even a four year honours (what I decided to do in the end) and keep your LSAT score or even try and improve it and get a banging scholarship from McGill and go to your top pick! Especially if you want to practice there. Or even get ahead of the game you want and work on your French! You're already excelling relative to your peers but if UofS isn't your first choice there isn't a huge rush. Maybe give it a year, or even two, and distinguish yourself further and chase your dream school and make sure you come out of your dream school a top grad! 

Ps. I didn't think I'd mature academically more after my second year, but alas, I did. 

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3 hours ago, thesizzlingwok said:

I remember being really keen to try and chase law after second year of undergrad. And I don't remember who it was specifically, but someone in my life way more experienced in the world of academia and law made the point to me that rushing through school to be the youngest person won't necessarily be an asset. That completely contradicted everything I had figured, I had figured getting in after two and being super young with nothing else in my life except for work would make me a glowing candidate. They offered an account quite the opposite. As compelling of a candidate as you may be being young and ahead of your peers (relatively that is), they offered the position that the oldest people in your class would likely get the job before you. People with responsibilities: family or finances to look after work more responsibly simply out of survival. Where younger people, such as yourself if you take the acceptance at UofS, you'll be done when you're super young, which makes you accomplished and educated which is ultimately the goal, but in terms of playing the long game it may not be your best best decision. Especially if UofS truly isn't your first choice. There'd be no harm in doing a three year, or even a four year honours (what I decided to do in the end) and keep your LSAT score or even try and improve it and get a banging scholarship from McGill and go to your top pick! Especially if you want to practice there. Or even get ahead of the game you want and work on your French! You're already excelling relative to your peers but if UofS isn't your first choice there isn't a huge rush. Maybe give it a year, or even two, and distinguish yourself further and chase your dream school and make sure you come out of your dream school a top grad! 

Ps. I didn't think I'd mature academically more after my second year, but alas, I did. 

4

Ah I think you're probably right. There's no need to rush such a big decision. Thanks for this comment. 

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