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Thebebebennies

Harvard minimum LSAT score

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3 hours ago, Mycousinsteve said:

Either be related to a famous politician, or you better be scoring 179 with a 4.0 

False.

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On 1/29/2019 at 7:39 PM, Thebebebennies said:

Hey guys! 

What's the minimum HLS's acceptable LSAT score ?

Thanks !

From reading through their admission materials there is no "minimum" per se, but you'd need some extra-ordinary achievements to get in with less than a 165.  This could be connections, it could be donating lots of money, child of alumni, dean's list, stellar athlete maybe like medalist at the Olympics, etc.

 

Harvard seems much more forgiving than many other top ranked schools if you can make up for your low grades with something else.

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8 hours ago, Mycousinsteve said:

Either be related to a famous politician, or you better be scoring 179 with a 4.0 

This is a mere claim.

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On 1/29/2019 at 5:45 PM, Tagger said:

You can get a rough idea here.

Damn that person with a 2.76 GPA (on a 4.4 scale no less) and a 142 LSAT who gained acceptance must have one hell of a story.  Or be ridiculously connected I suppose.  

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51 minutes ago, Stark said:

Damn that person with a 2.76 GPA (on a 4.4 scale no less) and a 142 LSAT who gained acceptance must have one hell of a story.  Or be ridiculously connected I suppose.  

possible reasons

his/her parents donated $5 million to Harvard

son/daughter of someone with financial/political influence

other factors- someone who had unusual life experiences

etc.

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On 1/29/2019 at 7:45 PM, Tagger said:

You can get a rough idea here.

Damn imagine getting waitlisted with a 3.87/178. The epitome of feelsbadman.

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12 hours ago, Stark said:

Damn that person with a 2.76 GPA (on a 4.4 scale no less) and a 142 LSAT who gained acceptance must have one hell of a story.  Or be ridiculously connected I suppose.  

I went down to Harvard when I was in high school (was considering doing my undergrad there).

Its not as hard as you think to get in provided you check some key boxes.

Being a child of alumni is a huge +, the admissions rate for them is very high I don't remember the exact number but I think they said it was around 20-35%.  Now add on some either high ranking leadership position or being on the Dean's list (which is much more likely if you are a child of an alumni) and yeah, I could definetely see a clear path to that.

 

I would also not be surprised if it was some rich (billionaire or multi-millionaire) kid whose parents just went into the Dean's office and wrote a check for $50 million.  Being a student athlete, those number would also be very in line with, simply because one would just be too exhausted from all the exercise to really score a meaningful grade.  It could even be someone who just got like a bronze in an Olympic sport or winter Olympic sport.

 

It could also be someone who was famous or the child of someone famous.  If you are related to the Kennedys or Bushes or some political royalty like that, that score would not be unusual to get in.Have you seen JFK supplementary essay?  To summarize it, it said my dad went to Harvard and I want to go too.

 

It could even be someone who was like a leader in a national organization who got a lot of press like the Woman's March,  Stoneman Douglas kids, BLM, etc.

 

The most common though are people who have high grades and scores but have competed and ideally won at the very least at some state level competition.  From what I remember they really stressed leadership, high grades and test scores and being involved in 1 or 2 student clubs, even leading them isn't going to be enough for most people.  I think they said they get more applicants with perfect GPAs than there are spots available by 3 fold, and more applicants with perfect or near perfect test scores than spots available, therefore, when everyone applying has perfect grades, they don't matter as much anymore.

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In general, you have a better than coinflip shot if you have something around a 3.85 and a 173. Absent something absolutely exceptional, the numbers are going to govern more than any "softs." If you have a 3.9 and a 175, for example, you're basically a lock. If you have a 3.8 and a 168, you're basically toast.

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Worth noting though that URM status changes the game completely. 

A 3.8/168 URM has a shot everywhere, including HYS. 

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Speaking as someone who currently attends H, an LSAT score in the 170s will put you in the mix, with a score above 175 making you a lock, and below 170 making it very unlikely. Between 170-175 or so, to varying degrees, other factors, including interview performance and ECs, will play more of a role.

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On 2/1/2019 at 5:58 AM, Stark said:

Damn that person with a 2.76 GPA (on a 4.4 scale no less) and a 142 LSAT who gained acceptance must have one hell of a story.  Or be ridiculously connected I suppose.  

 

 

On 2/1/2019 at 6:54 AM, Luckycharm said:

possible reasons

his/her parents donated $5 million to Harvard

son/daughter of someone with financial/political influence

other factors- someone who had unusual life experiences

etc.

Clicked on it... It's a racist troll account

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