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akratic

Clerkships 2019

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I thought a thread was in order. Also, for those applying to clerk at BCCA, does it seem odd that the "detailed questionnaire" on which they apparently decide their short-list doesn't allow you to include much info and doesn't match up with the sample questionnaire in the job posting?

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I completely agree. My resume looked awful when transferred to plain text. No concerns about the questionnaire though?

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3 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

It should be illegal to make people submit plain text resumes and cover letters now a days 

Ha. 

Was this just at the BCCA? I looked for formatting requirements in the FC system guidelines and thought I didn't see any...

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On 1/17/2019 at 5:55 PM, akratic said:

I thought a thread was in order. Also, for those applying to clerk at BCCA, does it seem odd that the "detailed questionnaire" on which they apparently decide their short-list doesn't allow you to include much info and doesn't match up with the sample questionnaire in the job posting?

I noticed this too. Not quite sure what happened there. Maybe they decided to trim down the questionnaire, but the "sample" reflected an older version? I know there have been changes to the application process this year (such as extending the deadline). 

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This was the same issue last year. It was really confusing because I prepped all my material ahead of time. 

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I found last year's clerkship thread useful for keeping track of when people had heard back from various courts (and not stressing too much until that happened). It doesn't look like one exists yet for this year, so to that end: please post when you get called for an interview!

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Does anyone know how ONCA interviews get scheduled? My family wants to go away for one of the two weeks they do interviews and I’m not sure if I should join them.

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10 hours ago, LawGuy1995 said:

Does anyone know how ONCA interviews get scheduled? My family wants to go away for one of the two weeks they do interviews and I’m not sure if I should join them.

From what I hear, they just give you a time and date and you have no input at all.

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45 minutes ago, akratic said:

Does ONCA or BCCA send out a confirmation notice that they received your materials?

BCCA does not, as far as I can recall.

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3 hours ago, SeniorLopez247 said:

Got a call from the FC yesterday.

Any tips for the interview?

Depends on your judge. Also depends on why you think you may be a good candidate for that particular judge. You may be interviewed because you attend a law school that the judge interviewing you has a strong connection with. You may be hired on grades or references. You may be hired on expertise. Be prepared to answer questions related to any or all of those.

For example, I was picked for interview (and hired) quite substantially based on my references and expertise. Accordingly, I prepped myself to answer questions related to how I knew and what kind of relationship I had with my references. I also could speak quite extensively on my expertise. Re the latter, I was also provided a choice of 4 or 5 recent decisions of my judge to discuss at the interview. Naturally, I read them all, and prepped a few of those.

Even if you do not get a decision to prep, it is probably a great idea to review a few recent decisions of theirs anyway--especially any with discussion online, either positive or negative (I would avoid focusing on anything that has been extensively criticized; but depending on the interviewing judge, it may reflect positively on you to show honesty and a willingness to disagree. WARNING: TREAD CAUTIOUSLY).

Get familiar with the FC's jurisdiction and some of its basic procedure. Be familiar with the types of law that the FC has jurisdiction over. You don't need to go down a rabbit-hole of learning all of Maritime law, but if you read a few Admin, IP, Privacy, First Nations etc. Law decisions, you'll get the picture.

Seems trivial, but if you've never done it before, practice saying "Your Honour" until it flows naturally. 

Finally, as with all interviews, the most important thing is to develop phenomenal answers to these two questions: 1. Why do you want to work at the FC (and even better, why for this particular judge); 2. Why should the FC (and this particular judge) hire you.

Good luck!

Edited by FineCanadianFXs
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9 hours ago, FineCanadianFXs said:

Depends on your judge. Also depends on why you think you may be a good candidate for that particular judge. You may be interviewed because you attend a law school that the judge interviewing you has a strong connection with. You may be hired on grades or references. You may be hired on expertise. Be prepared to answer questions related to any or all of those.

For example, I was picked for interview (and hired) quite substantially based on my references and expertise. Accordingly, I prepped myself to answer questions related to how I knew and what kind of relationship I had with my references. I also could speak quite extensively on my expertise. Re the latter, I was also provided a choice of 4 or 5 recent decisions of my judge to discuss at the interview. Naturally, I read them all, and prepped a few of those.

Even if you do not get a decision to prep, it is probably a great idea to review a few recent decisions of theirs anyway--especially any with discussion online, either positive or negative (I would avoid focusing on anything that has been extensively criticized; but depending on the interviewing judge, it may reflect positively on you to show honesty and a willingness to disagree. WARNING: TREAD CAUTIOUSLY).

Get familiar with the FC's jurisdiction and some of its basic procedure. Be familiar with the types of law that the FC has jurisdiction over. You don't need to go down a rabbit-hole of learning all of Maritime law, but if you read a few Admin, IP, Privacy, First Nations etc. Law decisions, you'll get the picture.

Seems trivial, but if you've never done it before, practice saying "Your Honour" until it flows naturally. 

Finally, as with all interviews, the most important thing is to develop phenomenal answers to these two questions: 1. Why do you want to work at the FC (and even better, why for this particular judge); 2. Why should the FC (and this particular judge) hire you.

Good luck!

Thanks! I didn’t expect such a detailed answer.

I didn’t get any materials to read for the interview, but I did read up on cases the judge has decided and further into their area of speciality. That’s on top of research on the court and jurisdiction, etc. 

Fingers crossed!

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It's always a good idea to be in touch with the current clerks, especially if they are grads of your law school. Clerks are often very involved in the interview/hiring process. You'd be surprised how many applicants never do this.

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Got a call from Justice Woods from FCA! Anyone have any tips for interviewing with her, especially for someone with 0 tax knowledge?

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Anybody heard from the BC Courts yet? Apparently their interviews start on February 4 (ie. this coming Monday) but I haven't heard of anybody being contacted, which seems odd.

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