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Hopefullawstudent11

Guidance needed (where to start)

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Hello!

I am deciding to start studying for the LSAT. The problem is that I have no clue where to even get started and what books to study from. If anyone could help me out in this process i would greatly appreciate it. 

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16 minutes ago, Hopefullawstudent11 said:

Hello!

I am deciding to start studying for the LSAT. The problem is that I have no clue where to even get started and what books to study from. If anyone could help me out in this process i would greatly appreciate it. 

Just sent you a message!

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I took in-person courses from Kaplan and Princeton Review and ended up with a 160 and 164. I took them mostly because I wasn't super motivated to study by myself during the summer while I was working. It was helpful to have to go to class everyday and have a guide to study. I did, however, also self-study for about 6 months, but I had a baseline knowledge from the in-person courses. I was really lucky that my parents helped me out with the cost of the classes, so I totally understand the cost can be prohibitive.

I found that the Kaplan Premier book was really helpful in getting a general overview of the test. It's fairly good at getting that first big jump in score after your diagnostic. The online portal is actually helpful and has quite a few resources (practice tests, question sets etc.). I supplemented my Kaplan books with the Powerscore Bible and question sets for the sections that I wanted to improve. Powerscore sometimes takes a different approach to solving questions, so it can be really helpful to compare strategies and find which one works best for you. The Powerscore blog was SUPER helpful for finding new tips and tricks and just how to organize studying!

The first thing to do is just familiarize yourself with the test. Read up (briefly) on the LSAC website about the sections and how the test is formatted (ie. how long it takes, how many sections, how it's administered). Don't try and learn how to do question until you've taken a diagnostic. It might seem uncomfortable to take a test where you literally have no clue, but it's super important to get a baseline score. From there, you can start studying and reviewing the question types that cause issues. For a few months, I took a practice test every Sunday to track my progress. Make sure your testing conditions are the same as the real LSAT (the time of the test, paper test with the proper scantron, no water, only pencil, strict timer, quiet, etc.). It might seem annoying and tiring to take that many tests, but it gets you into the rhythm of taking an LSAT and you'll find that your stress levels will decrease the more tests you take. I found the most helpful strategy was taking adequate time to review practice tests. It took me about 2 hours to review each section. Keep track of the questions you get wrong (make a spreadsheet or keep a notebook), why you got them wrong, if you thought you had got it right, if it was a silly mistake, and most importantly, what kind of question (ie. strengthen, flaw, main point, etc.). Use this info to guide how you spend study time.

Sorry for all the info! Please let me know if you have any questions. I don't have the highest LSAT scores, but I was intermittently studying for about a year and half, so I tried A LOT of strategies, books, websites, etc. I hope that I can be of some help! Good luck!

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I personally did private tutoring with a Skype tutor and did quite well. I think I needed that sort of guidance. 

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Powerscore books, Manhattan books, LSAT Trainer -- all good. 

Tutoring can be good, but really depends on learning style and many tutors probably aren't great. I tried with a few. Study partner is helpful, if you can find a good one. Probably harder to find a good one than it is to find a good tutor, though.

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The general advice I would give is buy Powerscore books and use them to learn "how" to do the test questions. Then untimed real old tests to hone skills. Look at what you're getting wrong and address that specifically. Eventually do tests timed, the closer to real test situations/time constraints etc., the better.

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