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    • If you work full time every summer of undergrad, even at minimum wage you're at $8,960 before taxes. Sprinkle in some part time at minimum wage during studies and an entrance bursary or two and you can make out ok for yourself.  Now consider I did labor (construction) with nearly unlimited overtime and there you are with no student loans and a car. I don't think its that bold to assume that, a minority of students graduate without debt, but are not quite vocal about it.  I appreciate this point, I think I took the work ideal a little too literally.  In the context of this thread that would be ideal you are correct. 
    • No ideal situation? Getting an acceptance anytime before May seems pretty damn ideal. You seem to be making some pretty bold assumptions, especially from a place where not many students are (or maybe I'm truly blind to the type of kids that end up at law school). Being able to move back to your parents place (maybe not so bold an assumption, but definitely not a reality for everyone), a car and no student loans... Cmon dude.
    • @Another Hutzmade solid points in another post that has relevance here. It's best to go to law school in the same province where you want to work.  This is because laws do differ between provinces, so you generally want to learn the law you'll practice, and it's far easier to obtain articles when living in the city you want to work in.  It's easier to attend events, make connections, etc. I'm no employer but seeing UVic undergrad + UVic law school is not unusual.  There's a bunch of UBC undergrad + UBC law school resumes out there.  Having a unique educational history may be an interesting topic of conversation or possibly relevant to the work it self, but it's not necessary.  People choose schools for many different reasons, e.g. family, friends, opportunities, having roots, specialization, etc.   "Mixing it up a bit and trying something new" is all well and good as long as it doesn't make it significantly harder to get to where you want to go. .
    • You both were insulting and rude from the beginning. Implying that us wanting to make an informed decision and not rush into anything means we would not succeed in law or law school is an insult.  This thread is going so off topic. It was about trying to see who hadn't had their file evaluated at Western. Lets stick to that. If you want to have your debate on whether you can move cities to attend law school in a week, make your own thread. 
    • Biglaw's problem (well, not exclusively big law), especially as a more junior associate, is always a general lack of predictability. Client decides late Thursday they want random request by Monday. Guess who has to rearrange weekend plans to get it done? (Hint, usually not the higher ups on the file). I think Ottawa has a good number of gov't and tribunal options. Obviously depends on your area of interest. Not too sure on in house, may be somewhat more limited with lots of larger companies being based out of the GTA. 
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