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LosingMoses

Discussions on Reddit?

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I am very new to this discussion board, so I might be missing something, but is there any reason why folks are not having these discussions on Reddit? Personally I find Reddit a lot more convenient to use, particularly because of the upvote/downvote system (allows one to easily identify the best answer to a question and ignore misleading answers - very important for contentious topics such as law school admissions). 

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There are LSAT, law school admissions and law school subreddits but they're pretty much all US-centric.

The utility of the forum is the ability to categorize posts in a way you can't do on reddit. 

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The categorization of schools & canadian centric content make this forum indispensable in terms of value for me.

Even if the content was on reddit, I don't think it could be categorized in such a manner to make is as useful as it is here.. 

 

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Posted (edited)

I don't know if Reddit would be better, especially due to limitations arising from the nature of a subreddit. But the main reason this is THE place for Canadian law students is that it was  ~first (atleast relatively?). 

Once you get people somewhere and that place becomes known for that one thing, it shouldnt/can't really change. This site has existed for a long time and has a history of being the place for Canadian law students. 

For example, in the us, after a shady new owner drove users away from the toplawschools forum (used to be very popular), the new lawschool.life that was created by the same mods has struggled to maintain a similar level of activity. Some regular users went to the new site but most people don't even know it exists and so either go on Reddit or don't go on any site because toplawschools is no longer popping. 

Another big factor is the content. There is a decades worth of information on this forum for prospective students. You just can't get that on Reddit. 

Plus having seen some of the passionate arguments on this forum, I very much would not like the ability to downvote/upvote comments. 

Edited by yeezy
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You can delete posts and accounts whenever you want on Reddit, so there are no repercussions for lying or disseminating inaccurate information there. 

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6 hours ago, yeezy said:

 

For example, in the us, after a shady new owner drove users away from the toplawschools forum

What happened on toplawschools?

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10 hours ago, LosingMoses said:

I am very new to this discussion board, so I might be missing something, but is there any reason why folks are not having these discussions on Reddit? Personally I find Reddit a lot more convenient to use, particularly because of the upvote/downvote system (allows one to easily identify the best answer to a question and ignore misleading answers - very important for contentious topics such as law school admissions). 

There's pros and cons to both. This is a specialized thread for individuals to share tips and advise regarding law school application, the hunt for articling jobs, associate positions, and so forth. There's also an "off the topic post" where the individuals on this thread can discuss political and other matters of the day.

The down-side, however, is that you have a team of moderators who retain the right to delete posts as they see fit and ban users. This isn't a feature of reddit (or at least not to the same degree), however, you don't have the same breadth of specialized knowledge there. I'd say perhaps this site should focus more so on law school/legal careers issues, and leave the "off-topic" stuff to reddit. 

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3 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

There's pros and cons to both. This is a specialized thread for individuals to share tips and advise regarding law school application, the hunt for articling jobs, associate positions, and so forth. There's also an "off the topic post" where the individuals on this thread can discuss political and other matters of the day.

The down-side, however, is that you have a team of moderators who retain the right to delete posts as they see fit and ban users. This isn't a feature of reddit (or at least not to the same degree), however, you don't have the same breadth of specialized knowledge there. I'd say perhaps this site should focus more so on law school/legal careers issues, and leave the "off-topic" stuff to reddit. 

[emphasis added]

If someone doesn't like the off-topic area, they can just ignore it. If someone chooses to go there and read and post, why should they then complain that there's an off-topic area?

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2 minutes ago, epeeist said:

[emphasis added]

If someone doesn't like the off-topic area, they can just ignore it. If someone chooses to go there and read and post, why should they then complain that there's an off-topic area?

I think perhaps you misunderstood my post. I have no beef with the "off-topics" section. It can be an interesting way to discuss ideas of the day. Rather, on many occasions, discussions, particularly on that thread can get quite heated which typically results in mods either shutting down that thread altogether, deleting content, banning individuals, or a combination of all three. In order to avoid that, my suggestion would be to hyper-focus this thread to law school and career related queries, and leave the debates for reddit.

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41 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

I think perhaps you misunderstood my post. I have no beef with the "off-topics" section. It can be an interesting way to discuss ideas of the day. Rather, on many occasions, discussions, particularly on that thread can get quite heated which typically results in mods either shutting down that thread altogether, deleting content, banning individuals, or a combination of all three. In order to avoid that, my suggestion would be to hyper-focus this thread to law school and career related queries, and leave the debates for reddit.

How does that address @epeeist's point that people should just avoid the off topic section if they don't like it? The mods may fairly care whether or have to shut down a thread, delete content, or ban people, but why does it matter to you? You can just avoid it. 

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58 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

The down-side, however, is that you have a team of moderators who retain the right to delete posts as they see fit and ban users. This isn't a feature of reddit (or at least not to the same degree),

This is exactly a feature of reddit, you have no idea what you're talking about.

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11 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

How does that address @epeeist's point that people should just avoid the off topic section if they don't like it? The mods may fairly care whether or have to shut down a thread, delete content, or ban people, but why does it matter to you? You can just avoid it. 

So if someone has an opinion, outside of the groupthink that is this thread, you’re saying they should just avoid off topics altogether? That’s not really conducive to a healthy debate one way or another. 

My point was to address OP as to the merits of LS vs Reddit. Sure it’s nice having a law school related thread which also has room for off topics. The problem is that if a person has an external idea that is different to what the likes of Rashabon’s and others groupthink, you’re shunned, the thread eventually shuts down, or it erupts. That’s the downside of this. Therefore, as a solution, my comment was to demonstrate that perhaps LS would be best served by focusing on academics and career queeries, and Reddit, a place which doesn’t get typically shut down and there is room for different opinions, the go to for debates. 

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Mycousinsteve said:

So if someone has an opinion, outside of the groupthink that is this thread, you’re saying they should just avoid off topics altogether? That’s not really conducive to a healthy debate one way or another. 

My point was to address OP as to the merits of LS vs Reddit. Sure it’s nice having a law school related thread which also has room for off topics. The problem is that if a person has an external idea that is different to what the likes of Rashabon’s and others groupthink, you’re shunned, the thread eventually shuts down, or it erupts. That’s the downside of this. Therefore, as a solution, my comment was to demonstrate that perhaps LS would be best served by focusing on academics and career queeries, and Reddit, a place which doesn’t get typically shut down and there is room for different opinions, the go to for debates. 

Your experience is very different than mine. @Rashabon and I disagree on a lot of topics. We honestly probably disagree on the majority of political issues. Him and I regularly have respectful disagreements, we both make our points, and then move on. @providence and I are an even better example of that. Despite our disagreements, I've never felt shunned on this forum, and I doubt Rashabon has either. And though I've contributed to shut downs or eruptions, that's never served as a really meaningful barrier to discussion with others. By and large, the mods are pretty good at reading a thread and only locking them once the opportunity for civil discourse is basically gone.

There's actually a very diverse set of opinions on this forum. I think that if you're finding the "groupthink" of this forum is a meaningful barrier to discussion, one (or more) of these things is happening:

  1. Your opinions are unacceptably outside the mainstream;
  2. Your tone or approach to posts is unacceptable;
  3. You have thin skin.

I'm not going to judge which of those are true for you, but I've found that the only times I've found this forum to be frustrating to engage with are when I have an opinion that (in retrospect) was unacceptable, when my tone or approach was to adversarial (which is saying something, because my tone is often adversarial here), or when my skin is too thin to handle people disagreeing with me.  

And again, reddit is there if you want to have debates there. You can just avoid the off topic thread and hash out your political arguments on reddit, if you want. I don't see why you think removing options for others is a good idea just because you don't like it.

Edited by BlockedQuebecois
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1 hour ago, Mycousinsteve said:

So if someone has an opinion, outside of the groupthink that is this thread, you’re saying they should just avoid off topics altogether? That’s not really conducive to a healthy debate one way or another. 

My point was to address OP as to the merits of LS vs Reddit. Sure it’s nice having a law school related thread which also has room for off topics. The problem is that if a person has an external idea that is different to what the likes of Rashabon’s and others groupthink, you’re shunned, the thread eventually shuts down, or it erupts. That’s the downside of this. Therefore, as a solution, my comment was to demonstrate that perhaps LS would be best served by focusing on academics and career queeries, and Reddit, a place which doesn’t get typically shut down and there is room for different opinions, the go to for debates. 

One huge advantage of an off-topic discussion on this board is that one is more likely to get posts from people who are more actually knowledgeable about the law (at least greater than the average person).

Not that this prevents some people from being [again omitting accurate words describing them per license plate sensibilities] but at least there's a greater likelihood people will understand, or make, arguments having some connection to what's legally feasible if applicable to the topic, even if otherwise they're [again, certain words omitted].

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30 minutes ago, epeeist said:

One huge advantage of an off-topic discussion on this board is that one is more likely to get posts from people who are more actually knowledgeable about the law (at least greater than the average person).

Not that this prevents some people from being [again omitting accurate words describing them per license plate sensibilities] but at least there's a greater likelihood people will understand, or make, arguments having some connection to what's legally feasible if applicable to the topic, even if otherwise they're [again, certain words omitted].

I think individuals in the legal profession like to imagine that they embody the qualities of civility and dignity … not to say that some lawyers aren't a bunch of [insert choice synonym for "terrible people"], but rather, that they might be more likely to present their offensive or rude positions in a more agreeable way. Maybe that's why I see less derogatory slurs on LS.ca than Reddit? Or perhaps individuals on LS.ca are just worried that one day the Law Society will uncover their identity? 

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lmao that I'm part of "groupthink". Conservatives are such whiny fucking babies.

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 I don't use reddit because when I was applying it was primarily US-focused. l also like it better here; the more people involved, the worse the discussion becomes, in my experience and opinion. 

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3 hours ago, Mycousinsteve said:

There's pros and cons to both. This is a specialized thread for individuals to share tips and advise regarding law school application, the hunt for articling jobs, associate positions, and so forth. There's also an "off the topic post" where the individuals on this thread can discuss political and other matters of the day.

The down-side, however, is that you have a team of moderators who retain the right to delete posts as they see fit and ban users. This isn't a feature of reddit (or at least not to the same degree), however, you don't have the same breadth of specialized knowledge there. I'd say perhaps this site should focus more so on law school/legal careers issues, and leave the "off-topic" stuff to reddit. 

Yeah. This isn't a downside. This is exactly what stops this website from being the mudpit of unverifiable crap that is most of the rest of the Internet. The fact is, communities like this only work as dictatorships. Benevolent dictatorships flourish. Less positive communities do not. But the notion that there could be some kind of anarchist wonderland with absolutely no one in charge of saying "this guy is an idiot who doesn't belong here" and anyone who wandered here would behave responsibly and self-moderate ... that's simply not realistic.

I'm not a fan of the off-topic here myself, but if people want to discuss it in a moderated setting because they prefer to avoid random idiots elsewhere ... I don't see why they should be prevented from doing so. Or are you really suggesting that it should be a rule of the Internet that people are not allowed to discuss random topics in moderated communities? I mean, are you actually suggesting that in the name of freedom we should prevent people from voluntarily subjecting themselves to rules in order to have the kind of discussions they want to have?

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6 hours ago, harveyspecter993 said:

What happened on toplawschools?

The site was sold without people being told about it. Mods and users we're confused and asking for info. New owner started placing restrictions on mods. When people started to get upset, new owner essentially banned talking about the sale or what was happening. Eventually mods left and created a new site. 

The place is a ghost town now. Unfortunately. 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Mycousinsteve said:

The down-side, however, is that you have a team of moderators who retain the right to delete posts as they see fit and ban users.

Have you used Reddit, like ever?

Edited by yeezy
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