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krumb

How to quit gracefully

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I have a great job at a great firm. I've been here for three months. In the short time I've been here,  the firm has taken care of me and I've learned a lot. I really like most of the people I work with. There are some drawbacks, but I won't describe them because they don't matter anymore. 

I have just been offered a job with my previous employer, and it's a perfect fit. I will accept the offer. (My job contract states that I can leave at any time if I provide two weeks' written notice.)

I want to leave this current job gracefully and to keep all goodwill intact. I'm looking for advice about how to do so. It's a small/medium firm so everybody knows who I am. I haven't been here long enough to build bullet-proof relationships, and so I need to go about this gingerly.

I'm grateful for any tips.

(Note: if you know who I am in real life, please KEEP THIS TO YOURSELF. Nobody knows yet.)

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Here's how my experience went when I left my old firm.

*knock on partners door*

Me:  "Hey how's it going?"

Partner F:  "Good, what's up?"

Me:  "I need to sit down for this one.  I think you know how much I enjoy working here, however I've gotten a job offer from x firm."

Partner F:  "Hmmm... I assume you're going to take it, and there's nothing I can do to talk you out of it?"

Me:  "That's probably correct."

Partner F:  "Hey Partner R!  utmguy got offered a job at x firm!"

Partner R:  "Wow, congrats!  Happy for you, sad for us.  x firm is a great firm!"

Partner F:  "Yup.  Great firm."

 

And then two weeks later, after my last day there, they gave me a $2,000 Christmas bonus.  

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My experience lateraling was similar to the above. I also provided more notice than was required and worked really hard to prepare comprehensive transfer memos for my files. I still have very good relationships with the lawyers at my old firm.

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On 12/14/2018 at 9:12 AM, krumb said:

I have a great job at a great firm. I've been here for three months. In the short time I've been here,  the firm has taken care of me and I've learned a lot. I really like most of the people I work with. There are some drawbacks, but I won't describe them because they don't matter anymore. 

I have just been offered a job with my previous employer, and it's a perfect fit. I will accept the offer. (My job contract states that I can leave at any time if I provide two weeks' written notice.)

I want to leave this current job gracefully and to keep all goodwill intact. I'm looking for advice about how to do so. It's a small/medium firm so everybody knows who I am. I haven't been here long enough to build bullet-proof relationships, and so I need to go about this gingerly.

I'm grateful for any tips.

(Note: if you know who I am in real life, please KEEP THIS TO YOURSELF. Nobody knows yet.)

You should just be honest, as you were here. Sit down with your boss and tell him or her how much you have learned and how nice the people are at their firm, but that you have received a job offer that you feel is a better fit for you in terms of your future goals, and so you are providing the required notice and moving on. Then thank them again for the opportunities they gave you. 

In the event that they ask for honest feedback as to what they can do better in the future, you might consider a very gentle way to explain some of the drawbacks, but only if they ask and if you feel comfortable. Don't talk about the drawbacks otherwise, either at the new firm or with current colleagues and friends.

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9 hours ago, lioness said:

You should just be honest, as you were here. Sit down with your boss and tell him or her how much you have learned and how nice the people are at their firm, but that you have received a job offer that you feel is a better fit for you in terms of your future goals, and so you are providing the required notice and moving on. Then thank them again for the opportunities they gave you. 

In the event that they ask for honest feedback as to what they can do better in the future, you might consider a very gentle way to explain some of the drawbacks, but only if they ask and if you feel comfortable. Don't talk about the drawbacks otherwise, either at the new firm or with current colleagues and friends.

"In the event that they ask for honest feedback as to what they can do better in the future,"

                       Silence is Golden

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Congratulations on the new position, OP!

When I was preparing how to advise my firm I was moving on, I realized that you can plan out exactly how you'll tell your employer that you'll be leaving, but the reality is that you only control your part of the conversation. You can't always plan for how partners will react to the news, so I'll echo what's been said above and say that being genuine and grateful is important. However, I'll also add the importance of not being too hard on yourself if the conversation doesn't go exactly the way you'd planned. 

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On 12/16/2018 at 6:01 AM, Luckycharm said:

"In the event that they ask for honest feedback as to what they can do better in the future,"

                       Silence is Golden

Generally its bad to burn bridges.

But if there's one thing that's not that insulting go for it. Like, "you guys need more support staff" would be something constructive that wouldn't go down badly.

Or keep quiet because its good to maintain the relationship.

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In keeping with the spirit of the season, have you considered walking into your boss's office with mistletoe on the back of your belt? :)  

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