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2019 Admission cycle discussion

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Now that round 1 admissions are done, let’s discuss trends and future rounds.

The blog says the chance of admission is the same for round 2 and round 3. What can we make out of it, given that a large number of admits were sent out in round 1?

Though I see numbers all over the place, I see a trend in favor of GPA. LSAT’s influence on admission decision seems to be waning. 

 

I recently came acrosss a employment statistics document released by ultravires. High LSAT score was seen as a significant roadblock in the effort to secure a job through OCI. 

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8 minutes ago, nnnnnnn said:

The blog says the chance of admission is the same for round 2 and round 3.

I highly doubt this. Less positions available means less chance, it's simple math.

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22 minutes ago, krnprykt said:

I highly doubt this. Less positions available means less chance, it's simple math.

I thought so too, but I guess they might be experienced enough to fill the right number of spots to allow space for equally strong applications in future rounds.

 

The increasingly subjective nature of admission criteria is little unsettling. I understand they use an algorithm that compares the candidate in hand with similar candidates in the past to assess a candidate’s success in law school 

Edited by nnnnnnn

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30 minutes ago, nnnnnnn said:

Now that round 1 admissions are done, let’s discuss trends and future rounds.

The blog says the chance of admission is the same for round 2 and round 3. What can we make out of it, given that a large number of admits were sent out in round 1?

Though I see numbers all over the place, I see a trend in favor of GPA. LSAT’s influence on admission decision seems to be waning. 

 

I recently came acrosss a employment statistics document released by ultravires. High LSAT score was seen as a significant roadblock in the effort to secure a job through OCI. 

What? Firms don't ask for your LSAT in OCIs and you would never put that on your resume or talk about it (or maybe a few people did, hence their lack of offers!)

Was posted about: this was a few years ago and seems the methodology/sample size may not be determinative of much. I doubt this influences a law school's admission policies.

 

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1 hour ago, nnnnnnn said:

Now that round 1 admissions are done, let’s discuss trends and future rounds.

The blog says the chance of admission is the same for round 2 and round 3. What can we make out of it, given that a large number of admits were sent out in round 1?

Though I see numbers all over the place, I see a trend in favor of GPA. LSAT’s influence on admission decision seems to be waning. 

 

I recently came acrosss a employment statistics document released by ultravires. High LSAT score was seen as a significant roadblock in the effort to secure a job through OCI. 

3

Can I just ask you to elaborate on this and what this stat means?

Also - I did get accepted to U of T but I am still waiting on McGill as I'm very afraid of the debt load there. I imagine other people are in the same situation, or, alternatively have great marks and a great LSAT and so are applying to some T14s in the US, or are waiting for scholarships. So, I would say that yes some spots are temporarily unavailable BUT that as other schools release acceptances more spots will open up (at least mine probably will- if that helps!)

While it does look like the trend is CGPA focused (could not believe I got in with a 164), there are also some lower stats - but - one thing I never accounted for is that there would be people applying from some very impressive US schools. I think when U of T sees a lower CGPA at Harvard vs. a high one at Concordia (myself) they are trying to look at things more fairly. That's not to say high GPAs at "low tier" schools should be discounted, just that they definitely are trying to be fair in their assessment. The grading scales are different in the US. At Concordia, an A+ is a 90+ and a 4.3, at some US schools  (for example, Lehigh, UT Austin) an A+ is a 98-100 and a 4.3. An A-, and so, a 3.7 is a 90 at some of those schools. That makes things significantly harder for them.

Also - this year the LSAT percentiles were pretty weird. I'm not positive how they work, but, last year my friend had a 162 and was 74th percentile, and this year a 164 is an 89th. That might explain why the numbers seem so different from prior years. (again, I'm no stats expert)

Edit: just read @providence post, I think there was maybe a misinterpretation on the part of OP about what this stat means (no offense) 

Edited by Megbean123

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My sense is that U of T has been placing greater emphasis on the GPA in admissions. I think there's a source for that somewhere, but I can't be bothered to find it. 

The notion that a high LSAT is a bar or roadblock to employment is ridiculous. To the extent there is any correlation, it's clearly spurious and the result of a confounding variable (because, as Providence mentioned, no one will ever know your LSAT except in so far as they know it was good enough to get you into U of T). As has been stressed ad nauseam on this forum, one you have an OCI, grades are of relatively little importance next to 'fit' and other soft factors. There are folks out there with near-perfect LSATs but weaker soft skills and it's not surprising that the LSAT might be negatively correlated with such skills. 

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"From the 2015-2016 admission year, the algorithm that assigns the two-thirds weighting to the Academic Record and LSAT was adjusted in a way that grants more weight to the GPA, since new data reveals that the GPA merits relatively more weight in predicting performance in first year than other factors."

https://www.law.utoronto.ca/admissions/jd-admissions/admissions-policies#ApplicationofAdmissionPolicy

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