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Dntwtchtht

"Excellent Academic Credentials"

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What kind of LS grades are national law firms in regional areas looking for when considering lateral hires? (London/Hamilton/KW)

A job I am considering applying to says "excellent academic credentials" and I am unsure whether to waste my time applying. I had pretty much exactly between a B and B+ overall gpa in LS

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1:  General life advice -- don't let some line in a job posting ever prevent you from applying.  

2:  I can say with near 100% certainty that your grades are fine, and would not be a barrier to you getting a job (in any market).  If you're lateraling, the firms will care far more about your work experience than your grades.  

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16 minutes ago, utmguy said:

1:  General life advice -- don't let some line in a job posting ever prevent you from applying.  

2:  I can say with near 100% certainty that your grades are fine, and would not be a barrier to you getting a job (in any market).  If you're lateraling, the firms will care far more about your work experience than your grades.  

This. If you had to satisfy every line of a job description, individuals at the junior level would rarely if ever get hired. That goes for pretty much every industry, not just law. Apply. The job description is just their ideal wants. Think of it as a wish list. Every employer wants a unicorn. That does not mean that is what they will get.

Edited by happydude
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1 hour ago, Dntwtchtht said:

What kind of LS grades are national law firms in regional areas looking for when considering lateral hires? (London/Hamilton/KW)

A job I am considering applying to says "excellent academic credentials" and I am unsure whether to waste my time applying. I had pretty much exactly between a B and B+ overall gpa in LS

If they had a precise GPA cut-off in mind they would say so.

Being hired as a lateral is nothing like being hired for articling.  The firm now has a specific position that they need to fill, and will be looking for someone with relevant experience for that position.  Your relevant work experience will be worth much more than an extra 0.5 on your GPA.

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I've been in my current position for quite a few years.  There are about 8 of us.  We had a retirement, and a job posting for a replacement, not long ago.  It in no way even remotely  resembled what we do.  

I agree with utmguy, don't let a line in a job posting prevent you from applying. 

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I can tell you that I have gotten a number of jobs, including my present one where I did not meet all of the criteria in the posting. 

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On 12/3/2018 at 9:58 AM, Dntwtchtht said:

What kind of LS grades are national law firms in regional areas looking for when considering lateral hires? (London/Hamilton/KW)

A job I am considering applying to says "excellent academic credentials" and I am unsure whether to waste my time applying. I had pretty much exactly between a B and B+ overall gpa in LS

I agree with the others. Go for it. The worst that can happen if you apply is that you don't get the job which will happen anyway if you don't apply.

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"Excellent academic credentials" is also open to interpretation. A candidate who was a straight A throughout their undergrad, and then in law school received mostly Bs, but  with a few B+s and As sprinkled in for courses where they beat the curve, would in my opinion be somebody with "excellent academic credentials". Just because you are an average law student does not take away from the fact your academic credentials are strong. If they were insistent on a certain GPA threshold being met, they would have said so in the job description.

A key part to any job (application) is confidence. Just think how many applicants see a line they do not meet in a job description, get discouraged, and then fail to apply. Don't be that guy (or girl). I bet, in some cases, lines are specifically inserted into a job description by employers with this type of thinking in mind - to deter candidates without the requisite confidence,  thinning the number of resumes they will inevitably have to review, as well as weeding out applicants that might not have the confidence needed for the position itself.

Edited by happydude

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Saw an interesting one the other day - am I hijacking this thread too much if I ask what exactly "Bay Street pedigree" means in the context of a job ad? Makes us sound like dogs!

Edited by QuixoticLawyer

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