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strugglingSFUgal

Has anyone felt like their undergrad institution had an effect on getting a job?

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42 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Anecdotal but..

 

Insofar as a business degree helps you get corporate law interviews, I found where you got your business degree also helped to a small degree. I.e I don't think a business degree from an average school is viewed the same by business law firms as a business degree from, for example, schulich. I knew one person like this who didnt have that stellar of a law GPA, but he did do very well in the whole process (including the 1L recruit) to the point that I'm hypothesizing his so called "elite" business degree helped him (at least marginally). Beyond that it really doesn't matter, I don't think.

Thank you! I do think that when someone sees that I got my business degree from SFU instead of Capilano (and vice versa) when I'm looking for jobs, it might be noted. More so because I would much rather work here in BC, and it is widely understood that SFU is much more reputable than Capilano. I know people on here aren't saying much of SFU but it's been climbing the rankings I'd say

Edited by strugglingSFUgal

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For my undergrad, I went to a university that is far from "upper tier" (most of my classmates, or at least those I spoke to, admitted to getting in with mid-Bs / 70% averages). The university, however, seems to have pretty enthusiastic alumni and when I've met fellow graduates in interviews / networking events, we've usually had extended conversations about the school.  

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Associating undergraduate schools with prestige is much less common in Canada than in other countries. As compared to the US or UK, Canada is very egalitarian. I have a cousin who is a woman of colour from a developing country who got a scholarship to Princeton for undergrad and then went to Michigan for law school. When she was travelling in South America one day, wearing a Princeton sweatshirt, she got into a conversation with another Princeton alum who turned out to be a partner in one of the biggest Wall Street law firms and ended up offering her a job. She said she didn't do outstandingly well at Princeton and doesn't know if she learned anything different than students at less-storied universities, but that name alone led to opportunities, even with her being a supposedly under-represented minority, that she would have never had if she had gone to Mississippi State U. 

In the UK, going to Oxford or Cambridge also provides instant access to a network and a recognition of prestige. Canada is not really like that. U of T, McGill and UBC are recognized as great schools, but I don't see their students getting that many opportunities above and at the exclusion of people from the University of Saskatchewan, University of New Brunswick, etc. I do think that McGill is seen in the US as the next best thing to an Ivy League. I studied in Quebec for a while (not at McGill but I had a lot of friends and family there and was often there) and there were a lot of Americans who studied there because it was cheaper and of higher quality than many good US schools and in their eyes, it had a better reputation than many reasonably well-known US schools. 

I think it also depends what you study. I've always heard that Waterloo is fantastic for engineering and STEM, but I have never heard that it's anything special for arts. U of T and McGill are definitely the most highly-regarded undergrad schools for music, and that is because of who they have on faculty. But there are some lesser-known schools that have fantastic programs - Brandon, Manitoba is one, and people come from Toronto and Montreal to study there. 

In my area, I think people associate prestige more with high schools than with universities, other than Harvard/Yale/Oxford/Cambridge. 

I always heard that Simon Fraser had a pretty good reputation. From what I know of Capilano, it's more of a community college that recently expanded to offer university courses? 

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9 minutes ago, lioness said:

Associating undergraduate schools with prestige is much less common in Canada than in other countries. As compared to the US or UK, Canada is very egalitarian. I have a cousin who is a woman of colour from a developing country who got a scholarship to Princeton for undergrad and then went to Michigan for law school. When she was travelling in South America one day, wearing a Princeton sweatshirt, she got into a conversation with another Princeton alum who turned out to be a partner in one of the biggest Wall Street law firms and ended up offering her a job. She said she didn't do outstandingly well at Princeton and doesn't know if she learned anything different than students at less-storied universities, but that name alone led to opportunities, even with her being a supposedly under-represented minority, that she would have never had if she had gone to Mississippi State U. 

In the UK, going to Oxford or Cambridge also provides instant access to a network and a recognition of prestige. Canada is not really like that. U of T, McGill and UBC are recognized as great schools, but I don't see their students getting that many opportunities above and at the exclusion of people from the University of Saskatchewan, University of New Brunswick, etc. I do think that McGill is seen in the US as the next best thing to an Ivy League. I studied in Quebec for a while (not at McGill but I had a lot of friends and family there and was often there) and there were a lot of Americans who studied there because it was cheaper and of higher quality than many good US schools and in their eyes, it had a better reputation than many reasonably well-known US schools. 

I think it also depends what you study. I've always heard that Waterloo is fantastic for engineering and STEM, but I have never heard that it's anything special for arts. U of T and McGill are definitely the most highly-regarded undergrad schools for music, and that is because of who they have on faculty. But there are some lesser-known schools that have fantastic programs - Brandon, Manitoba is one, and people come from Toronto and Montreal to study there. 

In my area, I think people associate prestige more with high schools than with universities, other than Harvard/Yale/Oxford/Cambridge. 

I always heard that Simon Fraser had a pretty good reputation. From what I know of Capilano, it's more of a community college that recently expanded to offer university courses? 

Thanks for your detailed response! Yes, SFU honestly does have a decent rep (personal opinions about location of the school aside lol) it has fantastic resources and a solid business program. Capilano, however, has recently expanded. Do you think it would make a difference to corporate firms in BC seeing that I went to SFU vs Cap or vice versa?

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3 minutes ago, strugglingSFUgal said:

 Do you think it would make a difference to corporate firms in BC seeing that I went to SFU vs Cap or vice versa?

You might get asked an icebreaker question during OCIs about going cap college or about how horrible the sfu campus is and how it rains all the time up there?

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2 minutes ago, kurrika said:

You might get asked an icebreaker question during OCIs about going cap college or about how horrible the sfu campus is and how it rains all the time up there?

maybe i could talk about how i decided not to kms at sfu 

 

 

that was a dark joke sorry

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19 minutes ago, strugglingSFUgal said:

Thanks for your detailed response! Yes, SFU honestly does have a decent rep (personal opinions about location of the school aside lol) it has fantastic resources and a solid business program. Capilano, however, has recently expanded. Do you think it would make a difference to corporate firms in BC seeing that I went to SFU vs Cap or vice versa?

Your concern is totally misplaced. 

Worry about getting into law school first. Then, worry about doing well. 

If you do those things, and you find yourself doing OCIs with firms,  the school you went to isnt going to make the difference. 

 

Edited by QuincyWagstaff

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16 minutes ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

Your concern is totally misplaced. 

Worry about getting into law school first. Then, worry about doing well. 

If you do those things, and you find yourself doing OCIs with firms,  the school you went to isnt going to make the difference. 

 

That's originally why I wanted to transfer schools and then I got thinking way too deep.

Edited by strugglingSFUgal

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On 11/27/2018 at 6:31 PM, providence said:

If you are struggling and are nowhere near the top of the class at SFU, it only gets harder in law school.

I had very very average grades in undergrad at UBC, somehow my law school grades are markedly higher 🤔

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11 minutes ago, canuckfanatic said:

I had very very average grades in undergrad at UBC, somehow my law school grades are markedly higher 🤔

Thanks for that vote of confidence hahaha. It's all about applying yourself

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Lioness’ post is excellent.

However, Canada does have a most-elite undergraduate institution: It’s Trinity College, U of T. There are impressive programs out there (looking at Queen’s Commerce, etc.), but Trinity, as an institution, is head and shoulders above any other college or university. It’s the closest you can get to the network-effects of the US/UK super-elite.

I went to none of these schools. Fight me. 

Edited by onepost

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14 minutes ago, onepost said:

Lioness’ post is excellent.

However, Canada does have a most-elite undergraduate institution: It’s Trinity College, U of T. There are impressive programs out there (looking at Queen’s Commerce, etc.), but Trinity, as an institution, is head and shoulders above any other college or university. It’s the closest you can get to the network-effects of the US/UK super-elite.

I went to none of these schools. Fight me. 

Never heard of it. 

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17 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

I find it really funny that you didn’t really leave any good faith reactions in your post 😛 I’m sure it was unintentional, but some people might just think it’s impressive that you went to such an objectively good school and in such an objectively challenging program (read: me). And I don’t even know what schools constitute the super elite, so I can’t really be hung up on prestige 

Sorry, I didn't mean to say that there weren't good faith reactions as well. There certainly have been. I was just referring to the times when it's awkward.

"Super-elites" are schools that aren't in the Ivy League (because they generally weren't around or were new when that designation took hold) but have very strong international reputations - many of them tend to be leaders in STEM fields and do cutting-edge scientific research. Generally if you're interested in science/medicine/scientific research as I was, you don't go to Harvard, Princeton etc because their undergraduate science programs and medical programs are not as highly regarded as their arts programs and there are better science programs. So think schools like Stanford, Massachussets Institution of Technology, University of Chicago, CalTech, Duke etc.

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18 hours ago, strugglingSFUgal said:

By "lower tier" I am talking about Capilano, University of Fraser Valley, Kwantlen, Brock, Athabasca, Algoma, etc.

And SFU, apparently.

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1 hour ago, onepost said:

Lioness’ post is excellent.

However, Canada does have a most-elite undergraduate institution: It’s Trinity College, U of T. There are impressive programs out there (looking at Queen’s Commerce, etc.), but Trinity, as an institution, is head and shoulders above any other college or university. It’s the closest you can get to the network-effects of the US/UK super-elite.

I went to none of these schools. Fight me. 

Interesting, if true. 17-year old me knew none of this when he decided to go to Western instead.

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I went to a small university that isn’t really thought of as a powerhouse of anything significant. Never was a problem in securing a job and not once did the school come up in any conversation I had with any firm I interviewed with.

I can’t imagine anyone caring.

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2 hours ago, onepost said:

Lioness’ post is excellent.

However, Canada does have a most-elite undergraduate institution: It’s Trinity College, U of T. There are impressive programs out there (looking at Queen’s Commerce, etc.), but Trinity, as an institution, is head and shoulders above any other college or university. It’s the closest you can get to the network-effects of the US/UK super-elite.

I went to none of these schools. Fight me. 

While I think I've heard the name before, it means absolutely nothing to me.

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3 hours ago, onepost said:

Lioness’ post is excellent.

However, Canada does have a most-elite undergraduate institution: It’s Trinity College, U of T. There are impressive programs out there (looking at Queen’s Commerce, etc.), but Trinity, as an institution, is head and shoulders above any other college or university. It’s the closest you can get to the network-effects of the US/UK super-elite.

I went to none of these schools. Fight me. 

 

Ze has a point, Morgans basically only hires trinity grads.

Edited by kurrika
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I don't know anyone, including friends who were at Trinity, who think that it's 'head and shoulders above any other college or university. That is a silly claim.

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