Jump to content
DarklyDreamingDexter

Am I being unrealistic in thinking i can pursue a side hobby during law school?

Recommended Posts

14 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Is this a satire account? 

No. I don't have oodles of free time to watch TV. I don't see how that's unrealistic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're saying that because you choose not to spend your free time watching TV, that's one thing. If you're saying you don't even have that free time, what the fuck.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may just be sweat shops that really squeeze out every minute out of you (even small firms, if that's where the poster works). But I certainly think to an extent what you're saying is hyperbole. No time to watch t.v.? Do you go to work, come home, sleep, and repeat? Do you work while you eat your dinner?

 

How many hours a week do you work? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, as a 0L, my jaw dropped when I saw that first reply.

I'm just glad people were quick to jump on the first poster (and whoever started backing them up) before what they said could get too far.

 

Edited by Xer
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of these comments are so ridiculous.  If I read that I'd need stellar marks and excellent ECs and need to spend 70 hours a week on them just to maybe get an articling job when I was a 0L I would've withdrawn my applications and went to work at McDonald's.

Seriously, how can anyone say that the time they spend on school related things approaches anywhere near 70 hours a week with a straight face? I do like half that ... on a busy week. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Shankar said:

Some of these comments are so ridiculous.  If I read that I'd need stellar marks and excellent ECs and need to spend 70 hours a week on them just to maybe get an articling job when I was a 0L I would've withdrawn my applications and went to work at McDonald's.

Seriously, how can anyone say that the time they spend on school related things approaches anywhere near 70 hours a week with a straight face? I do like half that ... on a busy week. 

Some students do put in 70, even without having journal and EC obligations that put them to that level. They spend 30-35 hours actually working, and 30-35 hours surfing the web and complaining about all the work law students have to do.

  • Like 8
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Some students do put in 70, even without having journal and EC obligations that put them to that level. They spend 30-35 hours actually working, and 30-35 hours surfing the web and complaining about all the work law students have to do.

Basically me in school. Part way through law school I started timing myself just to keep track of what the hell I was actually doing for hours at a time (never 70 hours a week mind you). I was shocked at how much time I spent just scrolling through the internet with my case books open lol. Prior to that I could have sworn I was investing all this time studying but in reality I was wasting time 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Some students do put in 70, even without having journal and EC obligations that put them to that level. They spend 30-35 hours actually working, and 30-35 hours surfing the web and complaining about all the work law students have to do.

Memes have been a big hit to the younger legal community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Trew said:

Memes have been a big hit to the younger legal community

Yup. My school has a meme page on facebook, and during exams the page gets a monumental uptick in activity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Facebook, the iphone and the ipad didn't exist when I was in law school (exaggeration... facebook opened up to Canadians when I was in law school). I would think it would make things very difficult. I did have the entire rest of the internet as a distraction, though. My strategy during exam time was to focus on studying from 9-12, then give myself total license to do what I wanted from 12-2, then study again from 2-5. Then total license again after that, and another hour or two of studying in the evening if necessary.

And obviously you can practice law and still pursue a hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I have Facebook completely blocked on my laptop. I told myself I could just mosey on over to the library computers if it was actually necessary. I have never found it necessary. 

Timing is also a great idea - I keep a journal of daily activities, and I find 5-6 hrs of real law work usually enough to do well throughout the semester, with an increase during exam times. 8 hrs of sleep = 16 hrs a day awake; even if you spent 8 full focused hours on school, which I wager most people who think they work all day don't, you have 8 hours of your life to do with as you please. I remember I used to think "that was a super busy day, I worked all morning, afternoon, and evening". Once I started keeping a log of activities, realistically that day would have been 2 hrs of study in the morning interspersed with facebook, news, getting coffee, talking to a friend, doing random other errands, grocery shopping, wasting time, etc... same with the afternoon and evening, for maybe 5.5 hours of focused work. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2018 at 5:33 PM, Rashabon said:

Why should anyone agree with this? Your premise states the conclusion you're trying to get to. There's no basis, logical or otherwise, to make this claim.

 

It literally begs the question. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, this thread is pure gold.

For anyone reading who's genuinely curious as to whether they can pursue a hobby while in law school - of course you can. I can assure you there are plenty of students who finish top of their class who put in maybe 40 hours a week. 

People who claim they don't have any time to spare are delusional. Or perhaps they belong to a particularly devout group of law-loving masochists. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, OWH said:

It literally begs the question. :)

 

On 8/13/2018 at 1:47 PM, OWH said:

What grades should I aim for if I want to date a lawyer? ;) 

 

Was that your move? ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a lawyer who previously studied and had a career in music and the arts, and music will always be a part of my life. It is hard to find as much time for music as I would like, but there are a few factors that go into that. First of all, I'm a sole practitioner and run my own firm, which I think may be more time-consuming than some other legal jobs. Secondly, I also have young children. It was my choice to combine starting a legal career and having children, but it does not leave a lot of extra time for extra-curriculars. If you do not add kids to the mix right away, or ever, you will have a lot more disposable time!

 

As well, I took my art pretty seriously and it is hard psychologically to transition to a realization that I will never do it at that level again (truthfully, I probably was not good enough anyway, which is difficult to accept sometimes.) But music takes a big time commitment and is not like your drawing which you say you can do for 40 minutes a day on your own time. If I were performing in an opera, there would be day-long rehearsals which just do not work with full-time work and parenting. 

 

I do do music at a level that works with my job - I am in a couple of choirs and I do the odd performance here and there when asked, and I practice at home and do music with my children. My job is not so demanding that I can't set aside reasonable time for that, though it does take good organizational skills. I also have an interest in writing, which is more like drawing in that you can do small chunks of it whenever you want, and I don't write every day but I am slowly making progress. Drawing could be a handy thing to do while waiting endlessly in bail court or for a jury to reach a verdict or for a client to show up to their appointment or to be brought into an interview room in cells or at the jail. I am picturing some interesting sketches that could be done of various objects and happenings around the courthouse and jail!

 

In short, I don't think that what you are proposing is unrealistic at all. You've already come to terms with the fact that this isn't going to be a professional venture, you are suggesting a pretty minimal amount of time, and it sounds very flexible. I don't really understand why you can't draw in law school. When I was in law school, people gossiped, facebooked and got drunk for way more than 40 minutes a day. It can't have changed that much! I worked hard in law school, but never as much as 70 or 80 or even 40 hours a week, and I had time for lots of other things, both law school-related extra curriculars and things that had nothing to do with law school. I worked part-time teaching music throughout law school and my grades didn't suffer at all. Also, if you are a lawyer earning good money, it can help support your art - you could afford to rent a space and hire a curator to put on an exhibition, and you would have professional contacts with lots of lawyers who want to show that they have some culture, and might be interested in attending and buying pieces.

 

I also found that when I was doing job interviews, or even now when I'm networking, people were and are very impressed with my musical pursuits, and they stand out from the "typical" lawyer hobbies which are the things @erinl2described - cycling, running (almost every lawyer I know does marathons or half-marathons), playing in hockey or softball leagues, hiking, skiing, golf, and the old standbys of cooking, traveling and reading, and of course, being involved with boards and politics. A lot of those other things are partly done for networking and business purposes, but when you do something like draw, play the piano or write poetry, it's a solitary pursuit you do for the sheer love of it. This makes it hard sometimes, but also draws admiration for your commitment to something beautiful, not because you want to be a judge or get referrals but just because you have a passion for it. I got lots of questions about my music, even requests to sing in interviews, (which was a bit weird!) and I would think your drawing would also attract positive interest. 

 

Many bar associations sponsor lawyers' theatre productions, cabaret nights etc so clearly lawyers have time to participate in those.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of the posters here sound like the cliche grandparent who walked 10km up the hill in the snow get to school, and then walked 15km up the hill in the freezing rain to get back home.

Look, I'm a lawyer, I don't have a 9-5 job (that is unrealistic), and I make time for all sorts of hobbies, quite apart from catching up with friends with drinks after work, making time for family, etc etc.

You do have to be a bit more efficient with your time. Multitask. Watch a TV show while on the treadmill (as an example). But to suggest that you may not have 40 minutes a day to draw is just idiotic.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • Either way, avoid the term "poly marriage" in your interview. Oh, and check the Ontario Reports, and the OBA classifieds:  https://www.oba.org/Publications-and-Resources/Job-Board The first posting on the OBA classifieds is for a 0-2 year call for a criminal position.  Mr. Confente has struck me as a reasonable man in my run-ins with him, although I can't speak to his virtues as an employer. 
    • Hey guys my stats are shown. What would be my chances for osgoode and other Ontario schools? Also, it is all full course load except for the last year where I took 9 courses during the year, instead of the usual 10
    • I don't want to be too affirmative with my comments because at the end of the day, it's still an educated? guess at best. Anyways, I definitely wouldn't put so much weight on your ps, it really is going to a small factor. If an 3.75 l2 and 164 didn't get you in then either look to your cgpa or improving your lsat. I would also double check that your l2 is correct. You can possibly call Queens and ask what they calculated your l2 as. 
    • Yes but you don't see the people that didn't get in with similar stats. I made the mistake of reading way too much into stats in the accepted threads and I thought I was in with my 161. If you're okay with that slim chance and have other options then of course that's fine. For me I only wanted law school and so my mistake really hurt me. 
    • I certainly hope so - I ain't getting any younger!
×
×
  • Create New...