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DeluxeVegan

Articling Salary

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Hi There,

I'm not sure which heading to post this under, so I hope it's appropriate here. I also did a search and did not find a relevant ongoing thread. 

Within the context of the Seven Sister firms (Toronto location), I noticed on NALP that most firms indicate an articling salary of 75,400/annum. However, one firm puts their articling salary as a weekly pay amount of 1,450. 

I'm trying to figure out if, in the end, these are two equal sums (just expressed differently) or if there's an actual difference. The firm that expresses their pay as a weekly sum is a Seven Sister firm, so I'd be surprised if they pay a lot less than the other firms. Yet, when I multiply out 1,450, I never seem to get up to 75,400.... 

I could just be extremely bad at math and missing vacation pay etc, but if anybody can lend guidance as to the articling salaries for the Seven Sister firms, that'd be appreciated. 

Cheers! 

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WOW, I can't believe myself... I could have just done 1450 times 52, which equals 75,400.... But, I was doing 1450 times 4 times 12 (which of course only represents 48 weeks, not our beloved 52 week year).... brain tired after the 2L recruit... 

So another question... seeing as articling isn't a year in length, I'm guessing this 75,400/annum gets adjusted for 10 months? 

Edited by DeluxeVegan
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Articling lasts for 10 months, not for one year. That's the entire mystery. 

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It’s 75,400 for an entire year (you have to deduct two months of salary making it closer to 64,000 over the course of articling... I didn’t actually do the math)

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24 minutes ago, DeluxeVegan said:

WOW, I can't believe myself... I could have just done 1450 times 52, which equals 75,400.... But, I was doing 1450 times 4 times 12 (which of course only represents 48 weeks, not our beloved 52 week year).... brain tired after the 2L recruit... 

So another question... seeing as articling isn't a year in length, I'm guessing this 75,400/annum gets adjusted for 10 months? 

Some firms pay materially more .

 

Edited by Constant

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1 minute ago, thegoodlaw said:

Don't know much about the Seven Sisters, but I can confirm that the Three Brothers pay articling students with either a stone, a wand, or a cloak.

Hope this helps.

Forced an audible chuckle out of me.

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58 minutes ago, thegoodlaw said:

Don't know much about the Seven Sisters, but I can confirm that the Three Brothers pay articling students with either a stone, a wand, or a cloak.

Hope this helps.

Best comment of the day.  Well played sir.

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Some firms will also pay for your bar study time which will add up to more than 10 months of pay, so there's that.

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On 11/9/2018 at 10:18 AM, Law Girl26 said:

Some firms will also pay for your bar study time which will add up to more than 10 months of pay, so there's that.

In my experience the firms that do that do it "pro-rated" so it's not actually "more" money. 

So, if they are paying $1450/week they would multiply that by 40 (for 10 months) and then divide that amount by "about" 52 (usually they start paying you in May, you don't start articles until August so there are about 12-13 extra weeks). 

It's something to be prepared for at these firms because 1. Your weekly salary goes down (because it's now being stretched a number of weeks) and 2. You are actually paying taxes/insurance etc. now (when I summered I never had to pay taxes because we didn't make enough over the summer).

Edited by TheScientist101
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If most firms are advertising 75k yearly salary, they probably pay you throughout your bar-time-off; if a firm is advertising 1450/week, they most likely will not pay you during your bar-time-off, but don't want to reveal the lower yearly salary; in other words, they want to appear competitive without actually being competitive, and hope that you take the job either without thinking about this or by being so impressed during the interview that you will ignore the lower salary.

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On 11/13/2018 at 7:36 PM, goalie said:

If most firms are advertising 75k yearly salary, they probably pay you throughout your bar-time-off; if a firm is advertising 1450/week, they most likely will not pay you during your bar-time-off, but don't want to reveal the lower yearly salary; in other words, they want to appear competitive without actually being competitive, and hope that you take the job either without thinking about this or by being so impressed during the interview that you will ignore the lower salary.

This is interesting, and counter to what I understand from the couple of firms I’ve interacted with on this issue. Is this truly widespread enough to be presented as a rule of thumb? 

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This may vary by province. In Ontario, most grads write the bar in June after the end of 3L and won't begin articling until late July/early August. @goalie  Are you saying that employers are paying their future students for the entire summer prior to them starting their articles?

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hmm, maybe I should understand Ontario before I open my big mouth. In BC, we do a 2 month course with the bar exam at the end (Course is called PLTC). Articling is 10 months; you can choose to do PLTC at the beginning, middle or end of your articling period (they offer the course 3 times/year). You have to have an articling position secured before you can sit for PLTC and thus the bar exams. Many firms pay your salary during PLTC, while others do not, but you know this going into PLTC. Apologies for the confusion; it must be different in Ontario.

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2 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

This is interesting, and counter to what I understand from the couple of firms I’ve interacted with on this issue. Is this truly widespread enough to be presented as a rule of thumb? 

Toronto firms pay you for a few weeks of Bar study prior to beginning your articles. But we don't have the same 2 month study with pay set up that Vancouver has. But their bar exam involves a structured 2 month course with assignments and stuff (which I think could actually be beneficial). Ontario's bar set up = 6 weeks of stressful self-study at the end of 3rd year. 

I think 2 weeks of pay is pretty standard. But if I was at a great firm and they didnt offer me this two weeks' pay I don't think I would be terribly mad. I would forego 1 paycheque to be at firm that I really liked - its about longterm gain

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