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On 11/9/2018 at 12:24 PM, Ryn said:

The difficulty that comes from practicing law in the UK comes in the training after law school. Law school itself is about as difficult as a general undergrad, maybe a bit more challenging (I’m speaking generally, not of the “elite” UK schools).

[For context, I'm British and did a undergrad at an 'elite' university in the UK and am now doing a law degree in Canada having moved here.]

I think the thing that Canadians on this board don't appreciate about law in England, is that unless you go to an 'elite' school, the chances of you actually becoming a lawyer are very slim. So, while it is certainly true that you can drift through a law degree at many universities, and work no harder than your average undergrad student in Canada, if you actually want to get a job at the end of it, it really helps to go to Oxbridge, or one of the next 4 or 5 ranked universities, and it's safe to say my friends doing law at Oxbridge worked as hard or harder than I do in law school.

As Ryn said, the challenge in the UK isn't getting into a law degree, it's finding a training contract at the other end, which is much harder. 

Not to say that you couldn't get a legal job after graduating from Leicester, I'm sure people do, but it it would be an uphill battle and it it would be a very long way down my list of prospective universities if I were trying to find a job in a city in England. To the point that I probably wouldn't waste the money if it were the only school i could get into. 

(Probably the fact that Leicester markets so heavily to Canadians should be indicative of the fact that they don't have enough people applying... or possibly that they're money grabbing for international fees) 

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9 hours ago, groovymoose said:

[For context, I'm British and did a undergrad at an 'elite' university in the UK and am now doing a law degree in Canada having moved here.]

I think the thing that Canadians on this board don't appreciate about law in England, is that unless you go to an 'elite' school, the chances of you actually becoming a lawyer are very slim. So, while it is certainly true that you can drift through a law degree at many universities, and work no harder than your average undergrad student in Canada, if you actually want to get a job at the end of it, it really helps to go to Oxbridge, or one of the next 4 or 5 ranked universities, and it's safe to say my friends doing law at Oxbridge worked as hard or harder than I do in law school.

As Ryn said, the challenge in the UK isn't getting into a law degree, it's finding a training contract at the other end, which is much harder. 

Not to say that you couldn't get a legal job after graduating from Leicester, I'm sure people do, but it it would be an uphill battle and it it would be a very long way down my list of prospective universities if I were trying to find a job in a city in England. To the point that I probably wouldn't waste the money if it were the only school i could get into. 

(Probably the fact that Leicester markets so heavily to Canadians should be indicative of the fact that they don't have enough people applying... or possibly that they're money grabbing for international fees) 

I've tried to explain this but it usually ends with someone telling me I'm a crashing snob. I have former university classmates with seemingly impractical degrees (Mediaeval History, Theology, Classics, etc) who had no trouble landing jobs in law, merchant banking, or whatever. It's where you studied that counts...Leicester is actually better than most-- some Canadians are paying a small fortune to attend ex-polys. 

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