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Your thoughts on my analysis of chances [3.78, 3.84, 157 + MA]

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A long time lurker and this is my first post on this forum.

I would like to respectfully ask for your thoughts on my own analysis of admission chances. I'd appreciate any feedback or comment.

My files are:

CGPA: 3.78 (OLSAS scale), B3: 3.78 (OLSAS scale), and L2: 3.84 (OLSAS scale).

LSAT: 157 (2018 September), 70 % (This is accommodated LSAT score due to my medical issue. ) I will also take the 2019 January LSAT with accommodations, but I am highly sceptical if I would be able to increase my score for the 2019 January LSAT because of the workload of my current graduate program.    

I have already completed an MA in History (A- average).

In addition, I am currently doing the Combined degrees of Master of Information (Archival Studies) and Master of Museum Studies. (My current average grades are between B+ and A-, but certainly closer to A-.)

Volunteer and extracurricular activities include political actions concerning Marxism, president of the student union, work experiences, and mandatory military service (I am an immigrant).

I have also received quite many scholarships and awards from both my undergraduate and graduate programs.

As I am a very social justice-oriented person, my personal statements mostly concern labour and indigenous rights. 

I am eligible for both Mature and Access Category of Ontario Law Schools. However, I have mostly applied to Ontario Law Schools under Access Category.

I have applied to all law schools in Ontario, but I have currently no idea of how admission committees will evaluate my files under Access Category, particularly my accommodated LSAT score. So, I'd appreciate if you would be able to give me any feedback or comment on my own analysis of chances. (I have not used Ryn's calculation for my own analysis although I highly recognize Ryn's methods.) The below numerical rankings pertain to my preference for law schools in Ontario. 

 

1. U of T (Under Mature Category): 100 % rejected.

2. Osgoode: 80% rejected.

3. Western (Under Access Category): 50% accepted or 50% rejected probably?

4. Queens (Under Access Category): 50% accepted or 50% rejected probably?

5. Ottawa (Under Access Category): likely accepted?

6. Windsor: likely accepted?

7. Lakehead (Under Access Category): likely accepted?

 

Thank you very much again for your considerations in advance.

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Know that this is probably not accurate at all but for fun:

1. U of T (Under Mature Category): 75 % rejected.

2. Osgoode: 50% accepted or 50% rejected probably?

3. Western (Under Access Category): 75% accepted.

4. Queens (Under Access Category): 60% accepted

5. Ottawa (Under Access Category): 75% accepted.

6. Windsor: eh windsor is tough because of their 7 category criteria. 

7. Lakehead (Under Access Category):accepted. 

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Dear Luckycharm,

 

 

Thank you very much for your reply. May I respectfully ask you why you think that my chance at Ottawa is good? I know that Ottawa Law's admission is a kind of black box and, in this sense, the admission is very selective given that I am under Acess Category.   Thank you again for your comment.

 

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1 hour ago, ArchivesandMuseums said:

Dear Luckycharm,

 

 

Thank you very much for your reply. May I respectfully ask you why you think that my chance at Ottawa is good? I know that Ottawa Law's admission is a kind of black box and, in this sense, the admission is very selective given that I am under Acess Category.   Thank you again for your comment.

 

Ottawa LSAT cut off is 157

Your cGPA is strong

Ottawa gave out over 600 offers and you should get one of them.

 

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LSAT Range 171-180
(98th to 99th)
161-170
(83rd to 97th)
156-160
(67th to 80th)
151-155
 (48th to 64th)
Less than 151
(<48th)
Ottawa  2016 Cycle
 (Registered / Offered)
2/21 64/366 134/324 93/119 32/44

(Source: Internet)

Edited by NeverGiveUp

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8 minutes ago, NeverGiveUp said:
LSAT Range 171-180
(98th to 99th)
161-170
(83rd to 97th)
156-160
(67th to 80th)
151-155
 (48th to 64th)
Less than 151
(<48th)
Ottawa  2016 Cycle
 (Registered / Offered)
2/21 64/366 134/324 93/119 32/44

(Source: Internet)

Yeah, I read this to show that they made 119 offers to people with 151-155 LATS and 44 offers to people with LSATS under 151 (which is 🙄 to me.) How is that a 157 cutoff?

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2 hours ago, thedraper said:

Where is this from?

https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/admissions-criteria

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is mandatory for all applicants. The Faculty of Law does not have a cut-off or minimum score requirement. However, the Law School looks for an LSAT score above the 70th percentile. 

https://www.alphascore.com/resources/lsat-score-conversion/  

157=70.9 percentile (it changes every year but consistently above 70%)

 

 

 

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The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is mandatory for all applicants. The Faculty of Law does not have a cut-off or minimum score requirement. 

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14 minutes ago, Luckycharm said:

 

https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/admissions-criteria

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is mandatory for all applicants. The Faculty of Law does not have a cut-off or minimum score requirement. However, the Law School looks for an LSAT score above the 70th percentile. 

https://www.alphascore.com/resources/lsat-score-conversion/  

157=70.9 percentile (it changes every year but consistently above 70%)

 

 

 

Considering they made offers to 163 people with 155 or less and 125 of those registered, the bolded seems not to be true.

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2 minutes ago, providence said:

Considering they made offers to 163 people with 155 or less and 125 of those registered, the bolded seems not to be true.

They can "looks for certain LSAT score" but the reality is not always the case.

157 with a 3.7+ is good for Ottawa

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4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

 

https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/admissions-criteria

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is mandatory for all applicants. The Faculty of Law does not have a cut-off or minimum score requirement. However, the Law School looks for an LSAT score above the 70th percentile. 

https://www.alphascore.com/resources/lsat-score-conversion/  

157=70.9 percentile (it changes every year but consistently above 70%)

 

 

 

Never interpreted this as a cut-off, but I see what you mean.

I've seen a lot of people in with low 150s, I wouldn't worry about it too much.

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