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Megbean123

UVic - What's it like?

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Just to confirm, Ontario does do OCIs at Uvic. My understanding is that it's not as fulsome of a selection (i.e., you'll get the national firms like Blakes, BLG, Norton Rose, etc., but maybe not the Toronto-only firms). That said, I have no idea what the success rate for students is in the Ontario recruit. I think there's generally less interest from students at UVic for Ontario, so I haven't gotten a vibe for the application/success ratio. You would have to fly out for in-firms, but the OCI process definitely happens. They also happen a lot earlier than they do in Toronto from my understanding. As an example, our OCI process was completed weeks before the "Toronto OCI prep thread" popped up on the career services page. 

We're also the only law school in the country with a co-op program, and that program is international. There are lots of government and smaller firms/in house positions posted through co-op in Ontario, and these positions are open only to UVic students as far as I'm aware. 

The "90 - 95% of students get articles" statistic is one I've also heard. One caveat though is that that statistic was - when I was told about it - 'within one year of graduating.' So it might only be 60% that get articles that start right after grad, and then a bunch of people find things after a year of hustling. I know at least one person who was successful at the recent Toronto recruit for articles this summer, finished classes a week later, and is now doing service-industry work for a year since their articles don't start until May.

What UVic is really great for in my opinion is practical, clinical experience. The Law Centre, the Business Law Clinic, the Environmental Law Clinic, and our law journal are all outstanding programs. I think there are similar programs at a lot of other schools, but the impression I got during interviews was that our approach was held in high regard, and known fairly widely. I would absolutely say my clinical experience more than my classes or grades are what landed me articles. If you want to walk out of Law school saying "I have represented clients in court and drafted actual, real contracts" Uvic is a place not only where you have those opportunities, but are encouraged to pursue as many as you can. I think the statistic is something like 99% of grads have participated in at least one clinical program.

Edited by bobainia
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21 hours ago, bobainia said:

The "90 - 95% of students get articles" statistic is one I've also heard. One caveat though is that that statistic was - when I was told about it - 'within one year of graduating.'

 

Now that I think about it, this is what I was told as well. "Within one year." They slipped it in so I never really thought about it but totally remember hearing this now.

21 hours ago, bobainia said:

What UVic is really great for in my opinion is practical, clinical experience. The Law Centre, the Business Law Clinic, the Environmental Law Clinic, and our law journal are all outstanding programs. I think there are similar programs at a lot of other schools, but the impression I got during interviews was that our approach was held in high regard, and known fairly widely. I would absolutely say my clinical experience more than my classes or grades are what landed me articles. If you want to walk out of Law school saying "I have represented clients in court and drafted actual, real contracts" Uvic is a place not only where you have those opportunities, but are encouraged to pursue as many as you can. I think the statistic is something like 99% of grads have participated in at least one clinical program.

You forgot Co-op! People have told me that Co-op looks really good on the resume as well. I think it served me well both in terms of landing a job and knowing somewhat how to begin working on a file. If not for the practical experience, Co-op was at least good for wrapping my head around actually finding a job and presenting myself in a way that is favourable to a law office.

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I did actually talk about co-op just not in the 'practical experience' part. But I totally agree! Co-op is a great way to work on interesting projects, figure out what kind of work you enjoy doing, have a unique experience to talk about at OCIs, and potentially secure articles (a lot of small/mid sized firms and institutions use the co-op system, and then take the person on afterwards).

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I think the take away from the articling rate is that there is nothing obvious to be concerned about. Everyone I know who graduated last year got articles if they were looking. And I can't imagine that the articling rate at UBC is much different than UVic, particularly since they have much larger class to place. 

I think there's not nearly as much of an articling crisis in BC as there is in Ontario, which doesn't help the OP, but should perhaps be something they should be aware of when considering articling success rate at UVic or in BC where the majority of people stay in BC or maybe Alberta...

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On 11/12/2018 at 5:54 PM, bobainia said:

We're also the only law school in the country with a co-op program, and that program is international. There are lots of government and smaller firms/in house positions posted through co-op in Ontario, and these positions are open only to UVic students as far as I'm aware.

 

16 hours ago, bobainia said:

I did actually talk about co-op

d'oh!

 

 

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