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Megbean123

UVic - What's it like?

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Hi, so I submitted a UVic app mainly because I was told I would likely get an auto-admission due to my LSAT/GPA. I'll be honest, I researched the school a little, but only submitted last minute so I could feel better knowing I would at least have one acceptance and calm down about my Ontario applications. Of course, while I was researching I saw the programs were very interesting and the course selection looked great. I've never been to Victoria, nor any part of the Canadian West Coast and the school wasn't even on my radar initially. Truthfully, in Montreal people have a lot of weird pre-conceived notions about people from the West Coast.. I wasn't all too excited by the video of students they put out, I actually found it looked rather depressing (but, obviously this is a stupid way to judge a school). 

So I have a few questions: 

1) is it possible to work in Toronto after UVic?

2) What are the articling stats like? 

3) What are the major benefits to Uvic vs. any other school? 

4) What is Victoria itself like?

Thanks! 

Edited by Megbean123

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1) Yes. It's much more effort though since only West Coast & Alberta firms do OCIs at UVic (I think) and you would have to fly back to Toronto for articling interviews. 

2) Don't know.

3) Class size is smaller, there is a real sense of community in the school. No corporate law influence (e.g. no classrooms named after firms). Less competitive (better for mental health). Good environmental law program and clinic. 

4) Beautiful but boring. It is a very sleepy town, where most bars close at midnight and people love their brunch. But, in law school you don't have much free time or money anyways so it's a nice place to study. Campus is 10 min from the beach. It doesn't get cold but rains a lot in the winter (though not as much as Vancouver). If you are the type of person who loves to hike and be really active, then it's a great place for you. If you are looking for the scene of Montreal then you might not be happy. 

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3 hours ago, azure said:

1) Yes. It's much more effort though since only West Coast & Alberta firms do OCIs at UVic (I think) and you would have to fly back to Toronto for articling interviews. 

2) Don't know.

3) Class size is smaller, there is a real sense of community in the school. No corporate law influence (e.g. no classrooms named after firms). Less competitive (better for mental health). Good environmental law program and clinic. 

4) Beautiful but boring. It is a very sleepy town, where most bars close at midnight and people love their brunch. But, in law school you don't have much free time or money anyways so it's a nice place to study. Campus is 10 min from the beach. It doesn't get cold but rains a lot in the winter (though not as much as Vancouver). If you are the type of person who loves to hike and be really active, then it's a great place for you. If you are looking for the scene of Montreal then you might not be happy. 

Hey, I'm just wondering what you mean by less competitive? 

- the school is less competitive relative to others in Canada

OR 

- the individuals within it are less competitive 

Either way - what makes you say  the environment is more cooperative than competitive? I imagine many students would be concerned with getting articling positions in a near dismal market?

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13 minutes ago, Megbean123 said:

I imagine many students would be concerned with getting articling positions in a near dismal market?

I'm kind of curious why you're considering going to a school where you call the market 'near dismal'.

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Quote

I imagine many students would be concerned with getting articling positions in a near dismal market?

Hey, are you sure you're taking the right approach to asking questions?

Edited by Tagger
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1 hour ago, Tagger said:

Hey, are you sure you're taking the right approach to asking questions?

@Megbean123 just needs to chill - his/her stats are fine and s/he shouldn't be getting this anxious and worked up over applications. Law school, articling and practice are a long road of uncertain things that can make you anxious. Otherwise next year we will be hearing "Are A, A, B+, B+ enough for OCIs?" and the year after "Are 10 interviews good enough or should I apply for the firm I don't really want just in case?" @Megbean123 - it's gonna be fine. Just be patient. You don't need to apply to "safety schools." ☺️

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14 hours ago, Xer said:

I'm kind of curious why you're considering going to a school where you call the market 'near dismal'.

I'm just reacting to the things I've heard on this site, that no matter which school you come from its still extremely tough to find a job after because it is "near dismal". I didn't mean out of Victoria necessarily, just in general. 

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12 hours ago, providence said:

@Megbean123 just needs to chill - his/her stats are fine and s/he shouldn't be getting this anxious and worked up over applications. Law school, articling and practice are a long road of uncertain things that can make you anxious. Otherwise next year we will be hearing "Are A, A, B+, B+ enough for OCIs?" and the year after "Are 10 interviews good enough or should I apply for the firm I don't really want just in case?" @Megbean123 - it's gonna be fine. Just be patient. You don't need to apply to "safety schools." ☺️

Yeah, that sounds like me. My brain goes to worst case scenario every time. Have you considered fortune telling as a side job? 😀

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13 hours ago, Tagger said:

Hey, are you sure you're taking the right approach to asking questions?

I'm not sure what you mean here, but, I'm pretty much just asking why would people be more cooperative at a given school when the external competition is the same whether you're at U of T, Osgoode, McGill or Victoria? What I have heard is that the outside market is competitive for everyone, so why would UVic be less competitive within classes?

Edited by Megbean123

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On 11/2/2018 at 8:13 AM, Megbean123 said:

 

4) What is Victoria itself like?

Thanks! 

Victoria is an excellent place to live. It has good transit, an excellent beer scene, good food, and easy access to the great outdoors.

 

Trying to get a summer or articling position in Toronto from BC is not impossible but you will have to fly yourself out to Toronto and make more of an effort.

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3 hours ago, Megbean123 said:

so why would UVic be less competitive within classes?

0Ls / 1Ls like to tell stories about how students at other schools are cut throat and unfriendly and its all paperchase all the time, but at <insert school name> the students aren't competitive and are all nice to each other.

It is mostly nonsense, people are the same across Canada.  Some are assholes and some aren't and there isn't some magic screening technique that concentrates  the assholes in one school and not at another.

Edited by kurrika
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6 hours ago, Megbean123 said:

I'm just reacting to the things I've heard on this site, that no matter which school you come from its still extremely tough to find a job after because it is "near dismal". I didn't mean out of Victoria necessarily, just in general. 

The reports of the death of the articling position have been greatly exaggerated. 

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If the bars you're going to are closing at midnight in Victoria, you're going to the wrong bars. And the benefit of brunch is that it's late enough that you can go to the bar the night before ;)

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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To the op:

What do you mean by "articling stats?"

Benefits to Uvic vs other schools: depends on your focus but generally the school has a stronger focus on social justice; stronger focus on environmental law and indigenous issues; the lectures were far less socratic; beautiful campus; beautiful city.

Victoria itself is the bees knees. I moved here from the interior, where the summers are scorching hot and the winters are perfect. I have lived in Vancouver as well. Victoria is a very mild climate with far less extremes than anywhere else you'll find. Think Vancouver but without the rain. A lot of people have the misconception that in Victoria it rains as much as Vancouver, but the truth is that we get almost exactly half the rain that Vancouver does. There's a reason they placed an observatory here, albeit many years ago.

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15 minutes ago, goalie said:

To the op:

What do you mean by "articling stats?"

Benefits to Uvic vs other schools: depends on your focus but generally the school has a stronger focus on social justice; stronger focus on environmental law and indigenous issues; the lectures were far less socratic; beautiful campus; beautiful city.

Victoria itself is the bees knees. I moved here from the interior, where the summers are scorching hot and the winters are perfect. I have lived in Vancouver as well. Victoria is a very mild climate with far less extremes than anywhere else you'll find. Think Vancouver but without the rain. A lot of people have the misconception that in Victoria it rains as much as Vancouver, but the truth is that we get almost exactly half the rain that Vancouver does. There's a reason they placed an observatory here, albeit many years ago.

Hey, yeah so a lot of posters here will say something about how many people of their class actually got articling positions post law school. So I was wondering, how many people actually find themselves with jobs right after vs. not? 

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On 11/2/2018 at 7:02 PM, Megbean123 said:

Hey, I'm just wondering what you mean by less competitive? 

- the school is less competitive relative to others in Canada

OR 

- the individuals within it are less competitive 

Either way - what makes you say  the environment is more cooperative than competitive? I imagine many students would be concerned with getting articling positions in a near dismal market?

I meant that students are less competitive with each other. Maybe collegial is a better word. For example, they don't post a list of student grades, and I found people didn't really talk about grades that much. For example, I was surprised to find out who was our top graduate was (highest marks).  People were really willing to help each other out in class, share study notes, form study groups, help you out if you had to miss a class, etc. It might just be due to the size of the class though, with only 100 people in each year, with many people coming from outside of Victoria, it leads to a more collegial environment. It's more anecdotal evidence shared with people who went to other schools, and I'm sure it varies with each class.  It was just a lot less cut-throat than I thought law school was going to be. 

This doesn't mean that students don't compete for jobs, or that jobs aren't competitive.  But I think it's important to get along with your classmates since the legal community is quite small and you will be working with these people in the future. 

1 hour ago, Megbean123 said:

Hey, yeah so a lot of posters here will say something about how many people of their class actually got articling positions post law school. So I was wondering, how many people actually find themselves with jobs right after vs. not? 

I don't think they publish that data, so you are only going to find anecdotal evidence. Firms from Vancouver (including the big corporate law firms) come for OCIs at UVic, and others end up doing OCIs in Calgary or Toronto, if that's what you are interested in. If you want to stay in Victoria, you are mostly focused on government or smaller firms focusing on family law, wills, trusts, real estate, etc. 

I would say the vast majority of the class found articles after graduation. I don't think UVic has any higher or lower articling hiring rate than other law school in Canada. I wouldn't pick a school based on student success rate at articling since it really comes down to your individual performance as a student (aka good grades), and things like interview skills. 

 

On 11/3/2018 at 3:57 PM, BlockedQuebecois said:

If the bars you're going to are closing at midnight in Victoria, you're going to the wrong bars. And the benefit of brunch is that it's late enough that you can go to the bar the night before ;)

I refuse to go to the Sticky Wicket or Darcys (mostly because I felt really old there) ;)

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4 minutes ago, azure said:

I meant that students are less competitive with each other. Maybe collegial is a better word. For example, they don't post a list of student grades, and I found people didn't really talk about grades that much. For example, I was surprised to find out who was our top graduate was (highest marks).  People were really willing to help each other out in class, share study notes, form study groups, help you out if you had to miss a class, etc. It might just be due to the size of the class though, with only 100 people in each year, with many people coming from outside of Victoria, it leads to a more collegial environment. It's more anecdotal evidence shared with people who went to other schools, and I'm sure it varies with each class.  It was just a lot less cut-throat than I thought law school was going to be. 

This doesn't mean that students don't compete for jobs, or that jobs aren't competitive.  But I think it's important to get along with your classmates since the legal community is quite small and you will be working with these people in the future. 

I don't think they publish that data, so you are only going to find anecdotal evidence. Firms from Vancouver (including the big corporate law firms) come for OCIs at UVic, and others end up doing OCIs in Calgary or Toronto, if that's what you are interested in. If you want to stay in Victoria, you are mostly focused on government or smaller firms focusing on family law, wills, trusts, real estate, etc. 

I would say the vast majority of the class found articles after graduation. I don't think UVic has any higher or lower articling hiring rate than other law school in Canada. I wouldn't pick a school based on student success rate at articling since it really comes down to your individual performance as a student (aka good grades), and things like interview skills. 

 

I refuse to go to the Sticky Wicket or Darcys (mostly because I felt really old there) ;)

If you feel old at the Sticky Wicket, you've got to be at least 65 ;) And even then....

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The sticky wicket is where the Budget post party happens every year.  It is not a happening place.

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On 11/7/2018 at 12:33 PM, Megbean123 said:

Hey, yeah so a lot of posters here will say something about how many people of their class actually got articling positions post law school. So I was wondering, how many people actually find themselves with jobs right after vs. not? 

They told me 90-95% of students get articles, and you can assume that at least 5-10% of students are not seeking articles (I definitely met a lot of people who were not interested in actually practicing law) so I'm sure almost everyone seeking articles does get a position.

With that being said, I think many folks either returned to their city of origin (lots of Winnipeg folks) and many went over to Vancouver, which creates an interesting scenario. While there are not that many jobs for articled students in Victoria, everyone who wants to stay in Victoria can usually find a place. I know of only one person who was not able to find a job immediately after graduation, but after working for a year he landed a position.

So, if you want to stay here, you shouldn't have a problem. But if your goal is to simply land any articling job in any market, there really shouldn't be a problem doing that either.

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1 minute ago, goalie said:

They told me 90-95% of students get articles, and you can assume that at least 5-10% of students are not seeking articles (I definitely met a lot of people who were not interested in actually practicing law) so I'm sure almost everyone seeking articles does get a position.

With that being said, I think many folks either returned to their city of origin (lots of Winnipeg folks) and many went over to Vancouver, which creates an interesting scenario. While there are not that many jobs for articled students in Victoria, everyone who wants to stay in Victoria can usually find a place. I know of only one person who was not able to find a job immediately after graduation, but after working for a year he landed a position.

So, if you want to stay here, you shouldn't have a problem. But if your goal is to simply land any articling job in any market, there really shouldn't be a problem doing that either.

I imagine I'll end up in Toronto, so articling there is what I'm really looking for 

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