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Ryn

I used to be on the admissions committee. AMAA

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On 1/29/2020 at 3:18 PM, AM44 said:

I was waitlisted at Osgoode last year with a 3.46 CGPA and 165 LSAT. Currently, I am doing another year of undergraduate to boost the GPA, and after the first term, I have managed to up my CGPA to a 3.49, according to OLSAS ( with a 3.97 GPA fall semester). If things continue to go this way, I will have a CGPA of 3.52 and an L2 of a high 3.8x (possibly 3.9). So I was wondering how much this actually raises my chances of getting in? Is the change from a 3.4x to a 3.5x significant, or do I basically have the same chances as last year? I should also mention that my course-load for this current year is relatively low (3 courses per semester); So I am not sure how significant the "L2" stats will be.  However, this relatively low course load is offset but by the fact I am also in the process of getting my MA, which I should receive mid-March

Thank you for all the answers, really appreciate them. Does anyone know the answer to the first part of my question, the one quoted in this reply?

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Hi Ryn, 

I know my chances are likely going to be slim, especially for a school like Osgoode, but I wanted to know whether you've ever accepted anyone with my stats and background. I have a cGPA of 3.35 but my L2 is 3.78. I had an eating disorder my first two years of university which was life threatening and really hindered my performance in school but after recovery I reached the top 15% of my program and was on the Dean's list. My LSAT score is a 154 which obviously is not competitive. I have worked as a crisis analyst and delegate in MUN, I've participated in UGMT (mock trial competition), I've worked as both an RA and a general volunteer at a Syrian refugee medical organization, I'm currently doing my Masters in Political Science, and I'm also working as a TA. I spoke about these things in my PS and I also talked about how being Syrian and trying to get my family refugee status in Canada inspired me to become a lawyer. 

Thank you for helping me as well as so many other applicants on here! 

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On 1/30/2020 at 7:13 PM, AM44 said:

Thank you for all the answers, really appreciate them. Does anyone know the answer to the first part of my question, the one quoted in this reply?

It's not statistically different enough to matter between a 3.46 and a 3.52, I'm afraid. But the L2 would be an asset - upward trends are considered.

On 2/25/2020 at 9:48 PM, koramayo said:

Hi Ryn, 

I know my chances are likely going to be slim, especially for a school like Osgoode, but I wanted to know whether you've ever accepted anyone with my stats and background. I have a cGPA of 3.35 but my L2 is 3.78. I had an eating disorder my first two years of university which was life threatening and really hindered my performance in school but after recovery I reached the top 15% of my program and was on the Dean's list. My LSAT score is a 154 which obviously is not competitive. I have worked as a crisis analyst and delegate in MUN, I've participated in UGMT (mock trial competition), I've worked as both an RA and a general volunteer at a Syrian refugee medical organization, I'm currently doing my Masters in Political Science, and I'm also working as a TA. I spoke about these things in my PS and I also talked about how being Syrian and trying to get my family refugee status in Canada inspired me to become a lawyer. 

Thank you for helping me as well as so many other applicants on here! 

Hi Koramayo,

Stories like yours do come by Oz and mitigating factors are considered. Your 3.35 GPA could be offset by the L2 and the experiences you mentioned above.

What worries me here is the LSAT score. It can be offset if the committee decides that you would be a valuable addition to the Osgoode community, but it's borderline. 

I did recommend acceptances for individuals who have gone through challenging circumstances, but each case is different and it's hard to compare them. 

FWIW - I don't think you're out of the running. It'll just depend on the full extent of your application. 

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For those previously on the committee, roughly how many spots would still be open at this point in any given cycle? (I know cycles vary due to various factors).

 

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7 hours ago, ZineZ said:

It's not statistically different enough to matter between a 3.46 and a 3.52, I'm afraid. But the L2 would be an asset - upward trends are considered.

Hi Koramayo,

Stories like yours do come by Oz and mitigating factors are considered. Your 3.35 GPA could be offset by the L2 and the experiences you mentioned above.

What worries me here is the LSAT score. It can be offset if the committee decides that you would be a valuable addition to the Osgoode community, but it's borderline. 

I did recommend acceptances for individuals who have gone through challenging circumstances, but each case is different and it's hard to compare them. 

FWIW - I don't think you're out of the running. It'll just depend on the full extent of your application. 

Thank you so much for your response! 

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Sorry for the very late reply everyone. Work has been quite all-consuming.

On 1/26/2020 at 2:56 PM, Reuben98 said:

Hi there,

I was wondering how the admissions committee at Osgoode might look at disability. 

I am not quite legally blind, but I am about as close as you can get. I have heard a lot about Osgoode being very pro-diversity, but my disability has limited my academic performance, and likely always will to some degree due to its immutable nature. I got 167 LSAT, but from what I can tell, Osgoode is not too concerned with LSAT so much as they are cGPA.

I am just wondering whether you have ever dealt with an application from someone in this kind of position (with an ongoing and immutable condition), and if you would be willing to shed some light on how a disability like this may or may not colour an application?

I just don't see a lot of discussion of disability on lawstudents, so I was hoping you may be able to enlighten myself and others a little.

I appreciate your ttime.

I can't answer this as thoroughly as you may like. I did make decisions on a few applicants with disabilities, but nothing like yours. For the most part, the factors with respect to disabilities that we looked at when I was on the committee was whether the applicant was receiving the necessary treatment and/or accommodations and whether such treatment/accommodations were having a positive effect on their stats. In other words, we were quite willing to overlook years of poor performance if, after receiving a diagnosis, treatment and accommodations, the applicant was able to show substantial improvement. This is not as applicable to something like your condition.

I would say that, were I to receive a file like this, I would be willing to acknowledge the impact the disability has had on your circumstances and put the rest of your application in perspective of that. I'd want to know what kinds of accommodations you've received and if those accommodations have been helpful. I would want to know, in an ideal world, what further accommodations you would need to reach your peak performance. I'd want to see evidence that you are able to succeed in law school despite your disability. On a personal level, I'd want to know why you want to be a lawyer and what your goal would be with a law degree. Assuming your performance in undergrad is not terrible (say, if it were to be in the B range), depending on your answers to the foregoing, you'd have a pretty good case for admission.

I can't say how the adcom may look at it this cycle, but I get the feeling this is usually the approach taken. Or at least it was when I was on the committee. But as I said, having never had a file like yours, I couldn't say with any more confidence than mere speculation as to how it would be treated.

On 1/29/2020 at 3:18 PM, AM44 said:

Hello everyone, 

I have a question; if anyone can answer, it would be deeply appreciated. 

I was waitlisted at Osgoode last year with a 3.46 CGPA and 165 LSAT. Currently, I am doing another year of undergraduate to boost the GPA, and after the first term, I have managed to up my CGPA to a 3.49, according to OLSAS ( with a 3.97 GPA fall semester). If things continue to go this way, I will have a CGPA of 3.52 and an L2 of a high 3.8x (possibly 3.9). So I was wondering how much this actually raises my chances of getting in? Is the change from a 3.4x to a 3.5x significant, or do I basically have the same chances as last year? I should also mention that my course-load for this current year is relatively low (3 courses per semester); So I am not sure how significant the "L2" stats will be.  However, this relatively low course load is offset but by the fact I am also in the process of getting my MA, which I should receive mid-March.

Also, I didn't fill out part B—is it bad? Do most people who get in fill out part B? 

I'm grateful for any answers and comments.

Thanks everyone. 

 

Part B is not required, and indeed I don't think it would reflect well on you as an applicant if you filled out Part B without a good reason in an attempt to shoehorn your way into that category. I certainly would have reacted poorly to that (though that wouldn't, by itself, mark you for rejection). I think I made more extensive comments about this earlier in the thread.

I won't answer the balance of your question since that's more of a generic "chances" query that you should post in the appropriate forum if you're interested in getting feedback.

On 2/25/2020 at 9:48 PM, koramayo said:

Hi Ryn, 

I know my chances are likely going to be slim, especially for a school like Osgoode, but I wanted to know whether you've ever accepted anyone with my stats and background. I have a cGPA of 3.35 but my L2 is 3.78. I had an eating disorder my first two years of university which was life threatening and really hindered my performance in school but after recovery I reached the top 15% of my program and was on the Dean's list. My LSAT score is a 154 which obviously is not competitive. I have worked as a crisis analyst and delegate in MUN, I've participated in UGMT (mock trial competition), I've worked as both an RA and a general volunteer at a Syrian refugee medical organization, I'm currently doing my Masters in Political Science, and I'm also working as a TA. I spoke about these things in my PS and I also talked about how being Syrian and trying to get my family refugee status in Canada inspired me to become a lawyer. 

Thank you for helping me as well as so many other applicants on here! 

See my answer above to @Reuben98's question, as I think it's partly applicable to your situation. I think given the necessary documentation and evidence that you are able to succeed in law school, I would have overlooked past poor performance in light of what you've been through and overcome. Your LSAT, however, is not very good at all, and while I'm not sure of the circumstances around which you took the test, I feel like your performance on it was not really affected by your medical condition. It will be a big hindrance and if I were in your position, I would try and retake it. Your ECs are great and your L2 is evidence you have academic ability, but your test scores are really going to hold you back.

Now it's possible to get accepted with your 154, but it's not likely.

On 2/27/2020 at 11:16 AM, HomerSampson said:

For those previously on the committee, roughly how many spots would still be open at this point in any given cycle? (I know cycles vary due to various factors).

 

Quite a bit, I would think. At least until April-ish, which is when, I believe, the last of the main offers go out and there is a greater focus on the waitlist.

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I hate to be another person asking but I have been slightly stressed about this entire process. I don't really understand how it works and what is given more weight. I literally have only heard back from 2 schools, one acceptance and another rejection and the other 4 no word from yet and I just wish I knew where I stood at least. I don't have the best stats with a CGPA of 3.66 and my last 2 years being around the 3.7-3.8 mark. I only scored a 157 on my lsat on my third try. The first I cancelled because of those tablets in July, September score I kept at 155 and third was 157 in January. I got 2 pretty good academic references because I knew them quite well and a non-academic reference. I am just wondering what you think my odds are for Osgoode. I know its such a stretch, but literally any advice that you can give me would truly be of help. Thanks so much

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