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Anonymous2310

Chances? (CGPA: 3.9)

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Hi everyone, 

Chemical engineering graduate with a CGPA of 3.9/4.0. I completed the co-op program where I interned in a multitude of working environments (academic research, governmental research and, industrial practice). I've got two scientific publications (second and third author). I've won an undergraduate research opportunity award (UROP). I'm fully bilingual (Studied in French until halfway through university when I was given no choice but to study in English). I'm greatly involved in community work via my volunteering at a palliative care hospice I've dedicated over five years of my life to (I have several functions at this hospice). 

I appreciate any feedback :)

 

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You sound like a pre med student who wants to change paths. That's not a bad thing, but be sure you explain strongly why you want to go into law in your PS.

 

Your GPA and ECs are strong. If you can write a good PS you're likely in - early even.

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27 minutes ago, Anonymous2310 said:

Hi everyone, 

Chemical engineering graduate with a CGPA of 3.9/4.0. I completed the co-op program where I interned in a multitude of working environments (academic research, governmental research and, industrial practice). I've got two scientific publications (second and third author). I've won an undergraduate research opportunity award (UROP). I'm fully bilingual (Studied in French until halfway through university when I was given no choice but to study in English). I'm greatly involved in community work via my volunteering at a palliative care hospice I've dedicated over five years of my life to (I have several functions at this hospice). 

I appreciate any feedback :)

 

Are you working in the chemical engineering field now?

why go to law now?

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I appreciate your comment, pzabbythesecond. Yeah, med was definitely something I had thought of. I've always been of the type to try and keep as many doors as I can open. I hope and I think I did a pretty good job on the PS. I tried to relate my background to my future aspiration of becoming a patent attorney. So I'll keep my fingers crossed haha. 

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Just now, Anonymous2310 said:

@Luckycharm , I should've clarified. I'll be graduated in December. The co-op program pushes graduation off by two regular semesters. 

Why law?

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7 minutes ago, Anonymous2310 said:

I appreciate your comment, pzabbythesecond. Yeah, med was definitely something I had thought of. I've always been of the type to try and keep as many doors as I can open. I hope and I think I did a pretty good job on the PS. I tried to relate my background to my future aspiration of becoming a patent attorney. So I'll keep my fingers crossed haha. 

And that's fair. And many people with science backgrounds do that. I suspect, barring French incompetency, you're admitted 

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Honestly, after having been exposed to the various facets of chemical engineering (by no mean have I explored them all), I simply have no desire to work in the field. Academic research in chem eng was exciting; I got to work with state of the art instruments and worked with an amazing team. But, I was thrown off by the slow pace and repetitiveness of it. Government research/work was dreadful (at least in the departments I found myself in), no one was truly motivated, people arrived late/left early and took many, many breaks. The buildings were mostly empty, etc. etc. Finally, in private industry, there was a huge division between engineers, operators and, contractors. As an engineer, you're a salaried employee who can receive bonuses based on performance. As an operator or a contractor, you're a unionized worker who gets shift work and no incentives to work hard besides the potential for overtime. And so, trying to achieve the common goal of improving processes/increasing company profits was non-existent. The only time, an operator was eager to try a new process parameter was when they had participated or had suggested the change in the first place. And so the reasons for which I want to go into law are the following: Eventually, I would like to have my own clinic/firm, I can stay up to date with science and inventions through IP law and I get to build these longitudinal bonds with motivated individuals who actually need and want my help.

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Almost done with McGill law

10 minutes ago, Anonymous2310 said:

I hope so lol I know the applicant pool is usually extremely strong. Are you currently in law school?

 

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