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torontohermione

Number of Reference Letters / OLSAS System

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Hey guys,

I'm sorry if there is already a thread concerning this and I missed it. As some law schools only require two references letters (but others through the system accept up to 3), if you ARE able to add a third referee will they read all three or only select 2 to read for the application. Would having 3 reference letters instead of 2 weaken or strengthen your application (especially if they are all diverse). Thank you in advance!

 

Edited by torontohermione

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38 minutes ago, torontohermione said:

Hey guys,

I'm sorry if there is already a thread concerning this and I missed it. I'm in the midst of adding my referees to OLSAS, and I'm not sure how many OLSAS will accept and I'm not willing to add 2 then realize I can't add a third (with the third being one I might have wanted more than the second, as once you add a referee and select send email it is locked in). What is the limit of referees OLSAS will allow you to add? As some law schools only require two references letter, if you ARE able to add a third referee will they read all three or only select 2 to read for the application. Would having 3 reference letters instead of 2 weaken or strengthen your application (especially if they are all diverse). Thank you in advance!

 

is it so hard to follow instructions?

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I had a hard time finding information regarding this too! From the research I've done based on the schools I'm applying to I found the following:

U of T-  doesn't consider references

Osgoode- will read all 3

Western- selects 2 at random (so just make sure if you are submitting 3 that you would be okay with them seeing any 2 of the 3)

Queens- will read all 3

Ottawa- couldn't find anything

 

Hope that helps :) 

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OLSAS lets you add up to three referees.

Ottawa wants at least 2 reference letters, at least one of which is academic, so they will probably read all 3 reference letters if you submit 3. And yeah, I agree that the information can be hard to find sometimes, so I don't blame you for asking here.

Edited by Xer
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