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Osgoode Personal Statements

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Hi everyone! 

Just a little unsure as to the personal statements required by Osgoode - one more explicitly asks for your extracurricular involvements and academic achievements, and one asks why a legal education and what I want to do with a law degree. I don’t want talk about the exact same stuff in both statements, but I also am not sure if the latter personal statement would suffice with just writing about the values and qualities I have with only a little mention to my application of them IN THE WAYS the former personal statement wants? If that makes any sense? 2000 characters is also not even a full page, so I'm struggling with writing the kind of narrative personal statement I've seen/started writing for other schools. 

 

Any advice on this would be super appreciated! 

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I can’t speak for Osgoode - not only am I now out in practice, but I was never privy to the decisions of the admissions committee. So there’s the caveat. However, if I were looking for candidates, I would see them as two halves - past and future. What have you done before, and why you made those choices .... and then law school in the middle....and then where you want to go in the future once you have graduated. It’s a focus on both the individual segments and the sweep of the continuum, I think.

Also, be aware that things do change, and don’t make your focus too narrow. Even if you are completely convinced your future happiness lies in tax law or divorce, you may find yourself unexpectedly drawn to something completely different, and I believe the students who get the most out of law school are those who leave that space open for serendipity.

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I had similar questions to those by the sounds of it last year, and now attend Osgoode. So here’s my two cents (one cent per question).  

Treat question one as a way for you to brag about your achievement but be humble. Use the answer to the first question as a way for you to discuss not only your achievements but their relevance  to you being a sound candidate for law school. 

Treat question two as a more narrative answer and one which provides your answer to some questions about where your desire to get a legal education in particular comes from. Why do you want to go to law school and how will you use your legal education? Do you want to go for the enriching education? If so, why is that something you want, how can an admissions person see that this is true and how does law school fit into your desire to obtain this enrichment? Have evidence to support your claims. For example, if you say you want to go to law school because you love to learn, you should probably have some evidence that you love to learn. Or perhaps you might want to use your legal education to work in mediation. That would be awesome but again have some proof to show this is actually a desire like a paper you wrote on mediation or experience working in mediation. Heck, maybe you want to go into law school so you can work as a sports law lawyer because you love sports. This claim could be made and supported by evidence of your passion for sports. 

I hope this has helped. The two questions will demand different responses and you’ll have to tailor your answer to osgoode in part because the questions are asking two unique things and because the character count is much lower than that of other schools. 

Good luck. 

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23 hours ago, LeoandCharlie said:

I had similar questions to those by the sounds of it last year, and now attend Osgoode. So here’s my two cents (one cent per question).  

Treat question one as a way for you to brag about your achievement but be humble. Use the answer to the first question as a way for you to discuss not only your achievements but their relevance  to you being a sound candidate for law school. 

Treat question two as a more narrative answer and one which provides your answer to some questions about where your desire to get a legal education in particular comes from. Why do you want to go to law school and how will you use your legal education? Do you want to go for the enriching education? If so, why is that something you want, how can an admissions person see that this is true and how does law school fit into your desire to obtain this enrichment? Have evidence to support your claims. For example, if you say you want to go to law school because you love to learn, you should probably have some evidence that you love to learn. Or perhaps you might want to use your legal education to work in mediation. That would be awesome but again have some proof to show this is actually a desire like a paper you wrote on mediation or experience working in mediation. Heck, maybe you want to go into law school so you can work as a sports law lawyer because you love sports. This claim could be made and supported by evidence of your passion for sports. 

I hope this has helped. The two questions will demand different responses and you’ll have to tailor your answer to osgoode in part because the questions are asking two unique things and because the character count is much lower than that of other schools. 

Good luck. 

Thank you so much for this! This is immensely helpful. 

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