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Summer Student Salaries?

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Last thread I could find on this was back in 2015.

 

Any recent insight on what sort of salaries summer students (1Ls and 2Ls) get working a large corporate firms in major cities?

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5 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Varies. Toronto is at 1450 I think, with some places offering 1600. Montreal is around 1000. Not sure about Vantown or Calgary.

Is this bi-weekly? Monthly? HOURLY  ?😝 *head expodes*

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4 minutes ago, mootqueenJD69 said:

Is this bi-weekly? Monthly? HOURLY  ?😝 *head expodes*

Weekly. If this is making your head explode, don't look at big law salaries in the states.

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27 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Varies. Toronto is at 1450 I think, with some places offering 1600. Montreal is around 1000. Not sure about Vantown or Calgary.

Bennet Jones tops Toronto with 1650 a week. Davies is at 1600. That flips around during articling though, with BJs paying market and Davies bumping up to top the market (93k pro rated, I believe). 

Summer and articling salaries are publicly available via NALP. It’s also worth considering whether firms pay articling bonuses or not. Really only matters for picking between firms near market, though. Also, don’t pick firms based on short term considerations like summer or articling pay. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois
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2 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Bennet Jones tops Toronto with 1650 a week. Davies is at 1600. That flips around during articling though, with BJs paying market and Davies bumping up to top the market (93k pro rated, I believe). 

Summer and articling salaries are publicly available via NALP. It’s also worth considering whether firms pay articling bonuses or not. Really only matters for picking between firms near market, though. Also, don’t pick firms based on short term considerations like summer or articling pay. 

This. If deciding between firms don’t make the salary a major consideration. Even at the associate level an extra $5,000 per year is not going to be noticeable. But what will be noticeable is how much you hate your life going to work each morning because the culture at your firm sucks or you’re not a good fit. 

Tdlr: make sure you like the people at the firm you chose because the difference between most other things (salary, type of files) will be negligible 

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Van standard for large firms was around 960-1000 per week I believe. Some firms go up to 1100. Not sure if this will stay consistent this year but no changes on NALP so far.

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The culture thing is obviously correct — but it is hilarious how hard it is to actually discern firms’ culture given (1) the omertà here regarding discussion of specific firms’ merits, (2) the LSO blackout period, and (3) the whirlwind that is the OCI process itself. Especially if you are not residing in the market in which you are applying, or attend a law school that doesn’t place tons of people through OCIs.

I don’t blame people for trying to make comparisons on the basis of salary in this environment.

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Looking at about 50-55k pro rated over the summer in Edmonton

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5 hours ago, onepost said:

The culture thing is obviously correct — but it is hilarious how hard it is to actually discern firms’ culture given (1) the omertà here regarding discussion of specific firms’ merits, (2) the LSO blackout period, and (3) the whirlwind that is the OCI process itself. Especially if you are not residing in the market in which you are applying, or attend a law school that doesn’t place tons of people through OCIs.

I don’t blame people for trying to make comparisons on the basis of salary in this environment.

 

I'm sure you could get feedback about specific firms by reaching out to one of the board's many Bay Street lawyers when you have more specific options. I don't think there's an omertà. I just think most people don't want to publicly air their opinion of a given firm, and if they do they're unlikely to really be honest. 

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Downtown Vancouver corporate commercial (McCarthy, Norton Rose, Fasken, etc.) is $50-$55k pro-rated with 3-5 days paid vacation. Looking at $4000 - $4500 per month.

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On 9/18/2018 at 12:48 AM, healthlaw said:

 

Tdlr: make sure you like the people at the firm you chose because the difference between most other things (salary, type of files) will be negligibl

Problem is that even if you went on a firm tour, were mentored by someone at that firm and did a-z during the OCI process you may still not have a good read on the firm culture. I’ve know people who thought they had it nailed but...not so much. 

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7 hours ago, Constant said:

Problem is that even if you went on a firm tour, were mentored by someone at that firm and did a-z during the OCI process you may still not have a good read on the firm culture. I’ve know people who thought they had it nailed but...not so much. 

Very very true, but I think there are subtle things students can and should look for. I went to a few firms where the lawyers and articling students genuinely seemed to get along really well and enjoyed each other’s company. They were honest about the work being tough but at my favourite firm, the articling students also talked about how they much leaned on each other etc. In contrast I went to another firm where the articling students were smiling but looked like they were on the brink of death lmao. If the articling students hate their lives THREE MONTHS into articles.. run! 

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