Jump to content
whoknows

So Um...What Now?

Recommended Posts

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), some decent-but-not-incredible EC's, etc. My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation, and I have a real interest in corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking. With that being said, I have no aversions to anything other than insurance defense/family/PI work.  I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. I've had 5 articling interviews (and a similar bazillion applications) and haven't received an offer, receiving either no feedback or little feedback from my interviewers (though I will note that some of them have been incredibly helpful). What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

I'm just kind of at a loss, I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s okay. You need to give yourself a break. Step back and breathe and recharge. 

This is not the time to panic. Far from it. A year from now, sure. But many students get articles during their 3L. I hired my student when they were two weeks from their graduation - and fwiw, a LOT of the applications I was seeing were from students at your level. It’s a tough market out there but the flip side is there isn’t anything “wrong” with you just because you have struck out thus far. 

You are feeling stress and burnout. The easiest fix is employment, but failing that do some self care. Reach out to a friend, take a night off to have a good meal or get drunk or binge on a video game or whatever. Give yourself permission to not think about it for a while. 

It’ll work out. Hang in there. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, whoknows said:

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), [...] My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation [...] I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. [...] What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

[...] I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. [...] I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

2

1. Don't panic, it both won't resolve anything and is also unwarranted;

2. I've been there. Lots of people I know have been there. You're like "how can I have invested this much time and energy yet continually come up short". That is a totally normal response that I and many others have also had.

3. You're getting stronger with every application, interview, and networking session You may not realize it, but if you're doing the right things--and it sounds like you are, because you are getting interviews (which means you're a desirable candidate on paper) and are implementing feedback you get along the way--you're becoming a more capable interviewee and applicant. Fabulous! You're completely on the right track.

4. There's no perfect normal timing to law students finding their dream articling jobs. Loads of law students go through formal recruits and/or accepted the first job that fell in their lap and became miserable as a result. Others held their breath and found something just right for them at the last moment. Don't fall into the trap of thinking "X didn't happen before Y time, and that reflects negatively on me". Not just because the logic is faulty, but also because it harms your confidence. It sounds like your grades are excellent, you're enthusiastic about a particular area of law, and are creating a fine professional network for yourself. There are lots of law students nowhere near that level. You're gonna be fine.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, whoknows said:

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), some decent-but-not-incredible EC's, etc. My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation, and I have a real interest in corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking. With that being said, I have no aversions to anything other than insurance defense/family/PI work.  I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. I've had 5 articling interviews (and a similar bazillion applications) and haven't received an offer, receiving either no feedback or little feedback from my interviewers (though I will note that some of them have been incredibly helpful). What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

I'm just kind of at a loss, I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

It's going to be OK. I know law school feels really competitive and you're probably feeling demoralized knowing that some people got jobs locked down in 2L and maybe some of them even have worse grades than you, and you feel like you're not measuring up. But I agree with the other posters that you're doing fine, and there's still lots of time to find something. All the students my firm hired were in 3L. It is way too early to consider doing something else. Just keep doing what you are doing but don't let it consume you - as others said, take some time off to focus on something else and be with supportive people. But also just enjoy 3L. Law school is so much less intense and demanding than work, especially in 3L. Embrace the opportunities - take courses you love, do the extra-curriculars you want to do, pursue non-law hobbies you may not have as much time for later. All of that can only help you in interviews too. Don't ruin your memories of 3L where all you did was stress over finding a job, which you eventually will do, and then you look back and wish you had enjoyed yourself more. (Advice based on the experience of a couple of friends of mine who went through this.) Give it some time. You have the advantage of decent grades and ECs and positive feedback, so keep at it - it is a tough market for articling jobs right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, whoknows said:

 So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

You're getting good advice about enjoying LS while it lasts and accepting the fact that you'll eventually be employed. I had to talk through the same issues with my friends when we were in 3L. They wanted to believe that they'd never article or work, and 3L became nightmarish for them. Being hired somewhere is inevitable. Drain every ounce of pleasure you can out of school, and just accept that a job is coming. Clearly you're intelligent and articulate. Keep applying and answering the phone.

The question I've underlined is more interesting. Will you ever be able to do the kind of work that, at present, interests you? The answer is probably No. I know of only 1 corporate law litigator in my class--the gold medalist. While other students ended up in areas of business law, they were handpicked early in the OCI process. I'm slowly accepting that one can work their way to very modest success as a litigator through demonstrated excellence in oral and written advocacy. But I don't think you can break into business law with that formula. I think it's mainly criminal and family.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm certainly not going to kick you in the ribs. I was inclined to leave this alone because I have limited insight into the sorts of practice you are looking at. It seems very alien to me, and I actually have quite a bit of sympathy for people who want to do "business law" and the sort of work you are describing, because it's the sort of thing you only get to do when you convince a large firm to hire you. In my area of practice, anyone can be a criminal defence lawyer if they are willing to compromise enough on other things. When no one else will employ you, you employ yourself - which is the goal for everyone who's good anyway. But while people do work as soles doing "business law" in some sense I know it isn't the same thing.

So I'll suggest one thing, and it may not help in your case but it could. Try to isolate what about business law, business litigation, etc. actually attracts you. Is it the area of practice yourself? Are you really that fascinated by corporate law? Is it the sort of people you interact with by doing this? Is it the idea of working in a large firm serving large clients and working to bill 2,000+ hours if you can with the hope of making partner one day?

I say that because there may be other options you could pursue, that you would find satisfying, if you can only isolate what you are really trying to find. It's amazing to me how much students never even think in these terms. It's vitally important to do so. If you find yourself disabled, as a basketball player, and you are despondent over losing your connection to the game, you absolutely must consider what it is you need. If it's athletic competition you need, you can find another sport that challenges you, even with your disability. If it's basketball itself and nothing else will do, maybe you can coach, etc. But you need to figure out the basis of your attraction in order to know what a reasonable alternative might look like.

Hope that helps, at least a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, whoknows said:

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), some decent-but-not-incredible EC's, etc. My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation, and I have a real interest in corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking. With that being said, I have no aversions to anything other than insurance defense/family/PI work.  I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. I've had 5 articling interviews (and a similar bazillion applications) and haven't received an offer, receiving either no feedback or little feedback from my interviewers (though I will note that some of them have been incredibly helpful). What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

I'm just kind of at a loss, I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

Tough situation, mate. You've got my sympathy.

1. Luck determines so much so don't think this reflects too much on you. You've obviously taken the right steps to be prepared for an opportunity. Just think of the random chain of events that has led you to this situation. It wasn't like everyone woke up in September of 1L with a master plan that they flawlessly executed. If you change your mindset on this, then you'll stop blaming yourself as much.

2. Stay ready. The events that are going to lead TO your articling position are swirling around in the universe. You just gotta be ready when that opportunity comes. So keep yourself in the batter's box so to speak. This doesn't just mean keep throwing applications against the wall. It means you gotta keep yourself as a functioning human being throughout all of this. Keep healthy, exercise, keep doing the stuff that makes you happy in your daily life as long as it's not slaughtering the innocents (dark). 

3. Remember why you want to be a lawyer. You want to be a corp/comm litigator? Sweet. If you're set on that, then think of what that's going to be like. Think of the complex cases and the respect afforded to you when the client is trusting your advice when the millions or billions are on the line. This will keep you going because it reminds you that all the shit is worth it. 

4. This can be an opportunity. I know it's tough to see right now, but an articling job that beats your expectations could be out there. You just never know. This happens, by the way, all the time: guy strikes out at normal recruiting only to find himself/herself in a perfect situation somewhere else. Struck out at Bay Street? That could mean you're going to a shop that is specialized in bus. litigation that doesn't work the crazy hours. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by grishamlaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, in case I haven't ranted enough, here is a story I go back to when I think shit isn't going to work out: 

Despite his superior academic record, Laskin, who was Jewish, was unable to find work at any law firm of note, because of the anti-Semitism that pervaded the English-Canadian legal profession at the time.[7] As a result, his first job after graduating was writing headnotes (i.e., article synopses) for the Canadian Abridgement,[1] a legal research tool.

In order to be called to the bar, it was required that he serve articles with a lawyer who was already a member of the bar. He had trouble finding a lawyer who would serve as his principal, because non-Jewish lawyers would not accept Jewish students. Through connections, he eventually found a young Jewish lawyer, Sam Gotfrid, who was willing to sign as his principal, but Gotfrid was himself only just starting out and could not provide Laskin with any work or salary. A year into his articles, Laskin found a non-Jewish lawyer, W.C. Davidson, who was willing to take him as an articling student, and he finished his articles with Davidson. In later years, Laskin would say that he articled with Davidson, not mentioning his initial start with Gotfrid.[8]

That's Bora Laskin's story. If he could bounce back, then so can you.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, grishamlaw said:

Also, in case I haven't ranted enough, here is a story I go back to when I think shit isn't going to work out: 

Despite his superior academic record, Laskin, who was Jewish, was unable to find work at any law firm of note, because of the anti-Semitism that pervaded the English-Canadian legal profession at the time.[7] As a result, his first job after graduating was writing headnotes (i.e., article synopses) for the Canadian Abridgement,[1] a legal research tool.

In order to be called to the bar, it was required that he serve articles with a lawyer who was already a member of the bar. He had trouble finding a lawyer who would serve as his principal, because non-Jewish lawyers would not accept Jewish students. Through connections, he eventually found a young Jewish lawyer, Sam Gotfrid, who was willing to sign as his principal, but Gotfrid was himself only just starting out and could not provide Laskin with any work or salary. A year into his articles, Laskin found a non-Jewish lawyer, W.C. Davidson, who was willing to take him as an articling student, and he finished his articles with Davidson. In later years, Laskin would say that he articled with Davidson, not mentioning his initial start with Gotfrid.[8]

That's Bora Laskin's story. If he could bounce back, then so can you.

I can think of the modern reaction to that: He did unpaid articles? Sam Gotfrid must have been an unethical shyster who couldn't teach him anything worthwhile anyway. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot speak from personal experience because I was very fortunate to have been hired in the official recruit, however, I spent all of 2L and some of 3L supporting so many of my friends who were in a similar position to yours. What I can say is that they all landed something by the end of 3L. That is not a guarantee, but just a reminder that you still have a good 9-10 months ahead of you to secure an articling position. Also, many of your peers are out of the "competition" by now so when you do apply to firms outside of the official recruit, it will be a very different experience.

Have you considered trying to apply to firms outside of whichever city you are focused on? For example, if you are focused on working in Toronto, perhaps you can look at some firms in the GTA to broaden your scope a little.

Also, keep in mind that many smaller/mid-sized firms may not have the resources to know a year in advance whether they need or can afford an articling student. Many articling opportunities will come up closer to January, or even March/April when those firms feel more comfortable making that call.

I know it feels horrible to go to so many interviews and get nothing out of them, but you are still training yourself on how to answer a variety of questions, as well as how to vibe with many different personalities. That is going to help you immensely in the upcoming months. Keep your head up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Hegdis said:

It’s okay. You need to give yourself a break. Step back and breathe and recharge...

Thanks, Hegdis. 

19 hours ago, FineCanadianFXs said:

1. Don't panic, it both won't resolve anything and is also unwarranted...

Thanks to you too. 

13 hours ago, providence said:

le. But also just enjoy 3L. Law school is so much less intense and demanding than work, especially in 3L. Embrace the opportunities - take courses you love, do the extra-curriculars you want to do, pursue non-law hobbies you may not have as much time for later.

I'm definitely doing this, while trying to add some heft to the old resume. I think a moot is in order, but we'll have to see how the tryout goes, it's been a while since I've been up on my feet. 

11 hours ago, Diplock said:

 When no one else will employ you, you employ yourself - which is the goal for everyone who's good anyway. But while people do work as soles doing "business law" in some sense I know it isn't the same thing.

So I'll suggest one thing, and it may not help in your case but it could. Try to isolate what about business law, business litigation, etc. actually attracts you. Is it the area of practice yourself? Are you really that fascinated by corporate law? Is it the sort of people you interact with by doing this? Is it the idea of working in a large firm serving large clients and working to bill 2,000+ hours if you can with the hope of making partner one day?

I'd be lying if I told you it isn't at least partially the idea of working for large clients, doing complex work, and I guess to some extent actually finding the subject matter around raising capital interesting. But what I will say is I wish it was a more singular interest. The reality is that I could probably be relatively happy in many areas of practice. In fact I often wonder how good I would be in criminal defence, given how strongly I feel about the work you guys get to do. I can find bits and pieces of numerous areas of law interesting, and the real thrill for me lies in being able to solve a Rubik's cube day in and day out. I like solving problems, and that draws me to (what I perceive are) complex areas of law. 

5 hours ago, grishamlaw said:

Tough situation, mate. You've got my sympathy.

Thanks a lot for this. 

3 hours ago, izzy2018 said:

Have you considered trying to apply to firms outside of whichever city you are focused on? For example, if you are focused on working in Toronto, perhaps you can look at some firms in the GTA to broaden your scope a little.

I've applied to Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, Kitchener/Waterloo, and Mississauga. I have preferences in terms of where I'd like to live, but generally I am far more preoccupied with finding a place that's going to give me the opportunity to grow as a student/junior lawyer than where I'm going to lay my head at night. 

Edited by whoknows
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, whoknows said:

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), some decent-but-not-incredible EC's, etc. My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation, and I have a real interest in corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking. With that being said, I have no aversions to anything other than insurance defense/family/PI work.  I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. I've had 5 articling interviews (and a similar bazillion applications) and haven't received an offer, receiving either no feedback or little feedback from my interviewers (though I will note that some of them have been incredibly helpful). What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

I'm just kind of at a loss, I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

[emphasis added]

I'm removed from this (PT solo, FT non-law) so pay more attention to others. But I've highlighted something I'm wondering about. Do you come across as interested in too much and thus your stated breadth of interest seems overly broad like you're desperate to work in anything? I may be overthinking this. You say you're interested in business law, essentially including everything, litigation and non-litigation. Someone more in tune with current firm practices can give a better answer, but e.g. at a full service firm, does not one tend to have litigators, and non-litigators who do the corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking? And not necessarily all those things. Perhaps @Uriel if I'm recalling his background as stated on this board correctly, can comment. I'm thinking, do you make clear - in your applications and in interviews - that while you're interested broadly, your primary interest is litigation?

That's not a diss at any other commenters, but then again, none of you have your own emoticon named after you... :uriel:

Also, as @Hegdis said relax and don't panic, may be just bad luck and competitive market. But also, I would suggest, if you have friends who are willing to talk to you in business law fields who got articles, discuss with them how many interviews they had, how interviews went, even though you're getting interviews doesn't hurt to compare your resume and cover letters with theirs, etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, epeeist said:

I'm removed from this (PT solo, FT non-law) so pay more attention to others. But I've highlighted something I'm wondering about. Do you come across as interested in too much and thus your stated breadth of interest seems overly broad like you're desperate to work in anything? I may be overthinking this. You say you're interested in business law, essentially including everything, litigation and non-litigation. Someone more in tune with current firm practices can give a better answer, but e.g. at a full service firm, does not one tend to have litigators, and non-litigators who do the corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking? And not necessarily all those things. Perhaps @Uriel if I'm recalling his background as stated on this board correctly, can comment. I'm thinking, do you make clear - in your applications and in interviews - that while you're interested broadly, your primary interest is litigation?

I definitely do note that my main interest is in litigation. From my discussions, you're correct in that you're not going to find many, if any, practitioners who both litigate and do the transactional side of those issues. But there are certainly litigators who specialize in securities/corp gov/banking related litigation (though I realize in Canada this is a much smaller area), it's why I was really hoping the OSC would give me a call for one of their litigation positions (I thought the A's in CivPro and Securities would help, they didn't). 

Edited by whoknows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, whoknows said:

I definitely do note that my main interest is in litigation. From my discussions, you're correct in that you're not going to find many, if any, practitioners who both litigate and do the transactional side of those issues. But there are certainly litigators who specialize in securities/corp gov/banking related litigation (though I realize in Canada this is a much smaller area), it's why I was really hoping the OSC would give me a call for one of their litigation positions (I thought the A's in CivPro and Securities would help, they didn't). 

An A in crimpro and heavy clinical experience probably would have been more helpful for the OSC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, whoknows said:

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 
 

 

If I may ask, which university are you attending?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are still securities firms hiring post-summer. Groia was hiring very late last year. The plaintiffs firms will pick up people at all times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Eeee said:

An A in crimpro and heavy clinical experience probably would have been more helpful for the OSC

Probably fair.

 

4 hours ago, OZ2017 said:

If I may ask, which university are you attending?

Queen's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/13/2018 at 3:32 PM, whoknows said:

So I don't know what I'm looking for here. Encouragement, tips, commiseration with fellow students, all are welcome in this thread. Hell, if Diplock shows up and kicks me in the ribs I'll deal with it. But I'm really wondering if it's time to panic or consider doing something else with my life other than law. 

I'm a 3L, I have good grades (Nothing below a B, smatterings of A's and A-'s), some decent-but-not-incredible EC's, etc. My main area of interest is business law, specifically business litigation, and I have a real interest in corporate governance, securities/financing, and banking. With that being said, I have no aversions to anything other than insurance defense/family/PI work.  I failed to secure a 2L summer job, despite a load of applications, and maybe 8 interviews. I've had 5 articling interviews (and a similar bazillion applications) and haven't received an offer, receiving either no feedback or little feedback from my interviewers (though I will note that some of them have been incredibly helpful). What I get most is that it was really competitive this year and they're sure I will land somewhere great. Which is nice to hear but doesn't help much. 
 

I'm just kind of at a loss, I've taken feedback to heart, gone for mock interviews, gone to coffee chats, taken informational meetings and phone calls, edited and re-edited application materials, and really tried to implement suggestions while still keeping at least part of my own personality in tact. I suppose I could just be completely unlikable to interviewers, though that doesn't bear itself out elsewhere in my life. So what gives? Do I have a chance at actually doing the sort of work that I want to at any decent level, or should I be considering heading elsewhere? I'm no stranger to failure, I've experienced it all the way through university, but I'm bordering on 3 years without any sort of win, and I'm just tired, and wondering if it's worth continuing to dust myself off for a profession that doesn't seem to want me. 

It doesn't sound like the legal profession as a whole is shunning you, but rather you only want to work in a few select areas (which is fine) and you are shunning everything else. It will be tough to get an articling position now in your areas of interest. The bulk of articling positions that I've seen are in civil litigation, personal injury, insurance defence, and small firm work. If you really want to practice law, then you need to broaden your horizons and be ready to article in an area that you're not interested in (if you can somehow sell yourself to that employer with your business-heavy transcript) or do the LPP. People who are unable to land an articling position by the end of 3L opt to do the LPP and still get called to the bar. So, your doom and gloom about leaving the profession that you haven't even entered is unnecessary. It is time though to come to grips with the reality that most of your options now, for articling, are not in Biglaw, business litigation, securities, and banking. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, I wouldn't stress too much.  Law school is an interesting environment where so many people are so competitive and too many students love to brag about their accomplishments so I can understand and sympathize how shitty it is to not have a job lined up when others are bragging about their jobs. 

With that said, you need to remember that you've got a full school year ahead of you.  If it was March or April and you didn't have something lined up then sure that's a bit more worrisome but you've got 8ish months.  Again, because of the braggarts it feels like everyone is succeeding while you're not, but there will be a ton of jobs that open up over the course of the year and I'd bet that there's more people in your class who are still looking for jobs than those who've already got one.  It's definitely not something to get too stressed about.  All the best! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



  • Recent Posts

    • I received a B in a Business Law class in my third year as a result of an abnormally high curve for the class. I believe the average was 86-87%, which normally translates to about an A-. Is it worth explaining in my application?
    • Hi, I am an American whose Canadian fiance received an excellent physician offer to Ottawa Hospital. I am applying to both Canadian and U.S. schools and learned about the joint American-Canadian JD...However, I am concerned for the same reasons that you illustrated.  I would like to hear about your experience thus far. Thank you. 
    • Hi everyone - very sorry for my lack of replies here. I set this thread to notify me when something is posted and I think that setting got lost in the forum upgrade.  I’ll endevour to answer stuff now, even though it may be later than you all probably wanted it to be.  I got the percent to letter mappings from the UBC website, and at the time it is my recollection that I translated everything correctly. I’m not in a position to check right now, but I will review the numbers I’m using and confirm that they coincide with what has been published by the school.  Bear in mind that “relied upon” is too strong a word to describe what I would say you can do with the numbers you get from the calculator. They’re an estimate (hopefully a reasonably close one) but nothing more. Your UBC-calculated grades may differ by a little or a lot, depending on your personal circumstances. My hope is that they’ll differ only a little a majority of the time.  I intend to fix this problem because it’s obvioisly causing some issues. When I’ve made the change I’ll update you all. 
×