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Nicki455

Socratic Method in First-Year Classes

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I will be applying to law school in November and hope to attend uOttawa next September!

I have several questions regarding the teaching method used by professors. I have been told that some first-year professors use the socratic method... Do they randomly call on students from a list to answer questions? How often are you expected to speak? I'm a little confused as to how this will work in a large class.

Thanks in advance for your help!

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Some profs do.  They will discuss their lecture and ask a question that would have been covered by the readings and will from time to time say:  John Smith, what's the answer? And then Jane Jones! What do you think?...

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Professor Feldthusen does it at Ottawa from a list of students with pictures attached.  It'll "happen" once every 2-3 lectures lol.  Most professors rely on voluntary participation and will award a grade bump to a few people in the class.

Edited by Trew
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16 hours ago, AvocadoAbogado said:

Feldthusen can be intense haha but not that bad 

He wears his heart on his shoulder when he talks residential schools 

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Adam Dodek did in it my 1L public law class. If you did the readings, the questions were never hard. He was always pretty chill about it, if you didn't know the answer, he would move onto the next student on the list  - nothing like The Paper Chase :)

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On 9/15/2018 at 7:12 PM, Fian said:

Adam Dodek did in it my 1L public law class. If you did the readings, the questions were never hard. He was always pretty chill about it, if you didn't know the answer, he would move onto the next student on the list  - nothing like The Paper Chase :)

Thank you for your response!

Would I have to answer a question or several questions per class? Or is it like once per week?

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Does Professor Kerr use the socratic method? I heard some great things about him and am hoping to take a class with him. :) 

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29 minutes ago, Nicki455 said:

Does Professor Kerr use the socratic method? I heard some great things about him and am looking to take a course with him. :) 

When I was there he did. The questions are like "Jane - what are the facts of this case?" and then "John - what did the judge decide?" and then "Janet - how did that decision apply to Tercon?" etc. 

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On 9/17/2018 at 10:53 AM, Nicki455 said:

Thank you for your response!

Would I have to answer a question or several questions per class? Or is it like once per week?

Dodek went through the list of students, so he would only call on you a few times per term.

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