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Tanny213

What type of Law is each school known for?

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Hello everyone, I was wondering about what each of the schools (mostly the ones in Ontario) were known for in terms of different divisions of law. Specifically, I was wondering if anyone knew which schools are best for the following subjects that I am looking to possibly pursue: Business Law, Constitutional Law, International Law, and Litigation (I realize Litigation is what a trial lawyer does, however, I'm sure some places are better at preparing young people for this than others).

Thank you!

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Queen’s has a good international program and the Dean has been aggressively focusing on business law since I attended (it used to be known as the school for criminal law, but no longer.)

However for litigation generally you want to work in a student clinic. Take a close look at the clinics at each school and how you get into one - eg is it via application or by lottery? Do you get credit or is it volunteer?

If you want to do Constitutional Law, take a look at criminal law. You deal with as 7-11 all the time, along with s.24.

Final point: reputations shift and change year to year. Your education is largely what you make of it. Don’t get too swayed by individual opinions. 

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2 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

Queen’s has a good international program and the Dean has been aggressively focusing on business law since I attended (it used to be known as the school for criminal law, but no longer.)

However for litigation generally you want to work in a student clinic. Take a close look at the clinics at each school and how you get into one - eg is it via application or by lottery? Do you get credit or is it volunteer?

If you want to do Constitutional Law, take a look at criminal law. You deal with as 7-11 all the time, along with s.24.

Final point: reputations shift and change year to year. Your education is largely what you make of it. Don’t get too swayed by individual opinions. 

Thank you!

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You will be able to study, and eventually practice in, any particular area of the law while attending any Ontario law school. You can see the courses offered at any law school by looking at the individual law websites.

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Dalhousie is pretty well known for insurance defence. Apparently TD and Intact are now recruiting straight out of 1L.

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51 minutes ago, neymarsr said:

Dalhousie is pretty well known for insurance defence. Apparently TD and Intact are now recruiting straight out of 1L.

Is Dalhousie the only school they do that for?  Seems odd.  

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Ottawa has the strongest international law faculty in the country by a pretty significant margin.

But Erin is right. All schools are strong in those areas, in part because those areas are colossal. And, to the extent your school matters for getting a job in a particular field, it is not due to the relative expertise of the faculty. 

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I'd say McGill is the best school for international law given its education, and its faculty in it (and opportunities available to its students, and not other Canadian law students by virtue of its European connections).

 

Feel free to PM for more info.

Edited by pzabbythesecond

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47 minutes ago, utmguy said:

Is Dalhousie the only school they do that for?  Seems odd.  

No clue why. One of their recruiters told me at my interview that Dal students just had "that look". Whatever the hell that means.

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7 minutes ago, neymarsr said:

No clue why. One of their recruiters told me at my interview that Dal students just had "that look". Whatever the hell that means.

Sounds like something someone would say who was trying to get you to join their cult.  Wait, yeah that makes sense.  

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38 minutes ago, neymarsr said:

No clue why. One of their recruiters told me at my interview that Dal students just had "that look". Whatever the hell that means.

No way this passes the sniff test. 

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I know that my school specializes in providing for a program that allows one to article, write the bar, and then become a practicing lawyer. Im not sure about the others though.

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I say this with love OP: your legal aspirations are broad/vague enough that any Ontario law school will serve you well and equip you with the skills you need. Chose the school that's in a city you want to spend 3 years in. Pick one that's potentially close to your support network (if possible and if that's something that is important to you). Consider the financial cost of your school (both tuition, cost of living in the city, etc). 

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8 hours ago, healthlaw said:

I say this with love OP: your legal aspirations are broad/vague enough that any Ontario law school will serve you well and equip you with the skills you need. Chose the school that's in a city you want to spend 3 years in. Pick one that's potentially close to your support network (if possible and if that's something that is important to you). Consider the financial cost of your school (both tuition, cost of living in the city, etc). 

I can't stress that enough. You can't just weigh the benefits of a school. You gotta weigh the costs too. This is especially the case because it's 3 years long. If you're going to come out with the mental health problems that are all too common, then the school specialities don't matter. 

Edited by grishamlaw

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I have to agree with Erin. Law school is what you are of it.

I have friends from uni who went to Ottawa, Toronto, Western, Queens, UNB, and UBC. I know people now who attended McGill and Windsor too.

I have a few friends who ended up on Bay Street, one from Toronto, one from Western, a couple from Queens, one who went to UNB although the is now out in BC, and some of my colleagues from Ottawa. One of my best friends from Ottawa ended up at one of the major Crim firms in Toronto 

The friend who went to Queeens clerked, then articled, and now works in the DOJ. 

Other Ottawa colleagues went to MAG, some CLOC and some Crown, etc. A couple went on to do LLMs and try to get into teaching. A couple articled in Ottawa. I articled in Crim defence in Toronto and ended up here in London doing family and child protection exclusively.

The UBC guy does business and solicitor work in Vancouver.

The McGill girl works for a political party.

Another Ottawa colleague worked for the UN war crimes tribunal in Cambodia and now works for her dad's firm in Toronto.

Another Ottawa colleague got into sports law and works for some kind of international sports arbitration body in the UK.

On and on and on it goes. Pick a school that's a good fit for you and name of it whatever you want.

 

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The advice posted above is great. I'll add that no matter where you go to school, so long as you dedicate your time to achieving your goal, you can do it. I know it sounds fluffy, but those who are devoted and intelligent rise to the top, one way or another. Yes, some schools are better connected. Some students get solid jobs due, at least in part, to who they or their family members know. However, if you work hard and separate yourself from the pack, you'll get to where you want to be.

I'll mention Lakehead because it's generally forgotten (probably due to being too new and too north) and I chose Lakehead myself. Working in a firm for four months rather than being stuck in class for 3L is great, and better prepares students for the day-to-day practice of law. Now, you have practically zero networking opportunities to get to Toronto, if that's what you're going for. In saying that, I note that myself and a few others landed the coveted downtown TO positions despite our inability to name-drop lawyers or mention a single professor they knew. Those who demonstrate their dedication will succeed, no matter the school. I often joke that Lakehead simply provides an additional challenge.

As for what Lakehead is known for? Its inability to keep a dean for more than a couple years, clearly.

As others have said, pick a school and perhaps a city that suits you. At the very least, pick a school with a solid pub close by to drown your sorrows. Good luck, OP.

Edited by TdK
clarity

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I agree with the above. If you're not 100 percent orientated towards insurance defence and therefore set on Dalhousie, then I don't think you can really go wrong with any other school.

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I will echo the above advice - look into the schools courses/clinics. 

If you're interested in litigation then I would also suggest attending schools that have good moot programs - As a bias Ottawa U alum I will take a moment to boast of the incredible program offered at that school (you will eat, live and breath "moot" for 8 months, but what you learn is totally worth it). 

Globe and Mail did an article on it here: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-university-of-ottawas-mooting-team-storms-the-international-stage/ It focuses on Prof. Daimsis who is mainly involved in the Jessup and Vis (which, if you're interested in international arbitration are the competitions to aim for). Note that although the article focuses on Prof. Daimsis the moot culture in general at Ottawa U is quite strong. There are many other teams focusing on a variety of practice areas all of which are supported by incredible coaches and faculty.

Edited by TheScientist101
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On 9/14/2018 at 8:20 AM, ericontario said:

I have to agree with Erin. Law school is what you are of it.

I have friends from uni who went to Ottawa, Toronto, Western, Queens, UNB, and UBC. I know people now who attended McGill and Windsor too.

I have a few friends who ended up on Bay Street, one from Toronto, one from Western, a couple from Queens, one who went to UNB although the is now out in BC, and some of my colleagues from Ottawa. One of my best friends from Ottawa ended up at one of the major Crim firms in Toronto 

The friend who went to Queeens clerked, then articled, and now works in the DOJ. 

Other Ottawa colleagues went to MAG, some CLOC and some Crown, etc. A couple went on to do LLMs and try to get into teaching. A couple articled in Ottawa. I articled in Crim defence in Toronto and ended up here in London doing family and child protection exclusively.

The UBC guy does business and solicitor work in Vancouver.

The McGill girl works for a political party.

Another Ottawa colleague worked for the UN war crimes tribunal in Cambodia and now works for her dad's firm in Toronto.

Another Ottawa colleague got into sports law and works for some kind of international sports arbitration body in the UK.

On and on and on it goes. Pick a school that's a good fit for you and name of it whatever you want.

 

I totally don't know how "what you make of it" got autocorrected to "what you are of it" or how "make of it whatever you want" got changed to "name of it whatever you want". Sorry.

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