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Hello! Longtime lurker, first time posting here.

I probably know the answer deep down inside, but I still wanted to ask... should I retake?

I've been studying pretty much continuously for the LSAT from March 2017 to July 2018. Did the same PowerScore review class twice (+ self-study) and my score got lower the second time around (Yikes). Untimed, my score is in the 160s so I feel like I have it in me to understand this test. I'm not sure what my problem is. I've been trying very, very hard. I guess I sort of burned out. I absolutely want to apply in this application cycle (because of a lot of factors) and I want to know if I am hopeless or what.

My school choices are (1) Osgoode (2) Queens (3) Ottawa (4) Windsor

GPA: 3.65; (B2): 3.7+ Really good references and ECs (well-- I think so)

LSAT HISTORY: 
Sept 2017: 152

July 2018: 147

Registered for Oct 2018 (International)

I have between now and October to give it another shot. Is there any benefit to applying early with my 152, or would taking the October LSAT (with one month's worth of additional LSAT review, on top of the year's worth I've put into it) be worth a shot? Perhaps I could just dig into the games and get a slight bump? 

Anyways, I'll try to keep this thread updated next year when I find out the results. Thanks and good luck to all the other desperate souls out there.

 

Edited by schoolisforever
typo

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7 hours ago, LawyerJustice said:

Apply now, and retake for November - worst case you don't get in this round and you try again! 

This is the wise thing to do. To add, I had to write the LSAT three times. 

But continue to apply yourself to your LSAT prep. There are plenty of practice books at Chapters/Indigo, Practice under test conditions, look at where you struggled on previous exams, etc. Preserverance is a remarkable useful quality that will serve you well in life, law school and your journey to acceptance. 

Just as a thought, you may want to look at other schools...... There are schools outside of Ontario whose acceptance criteria are likely going to be far more forgiving to you. 

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YES. Apply and take the LSAT times as many times as will be considered (up until February?). Since highest score is considered by virtually every school, there is NO PENALTY to doing multiple takes,  insofar as you have the funds and time to do so. 

But to answer your specific question, there is not benefit to applying early, just apply. 

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10 hours ago, schoolisforever said:

Hello! Longtime lurker, first time posting here.

I probably know the answer deep down inside, but I still wanted to ask... should I retake?

I've been studying pretty much continuously for the LSAT from March 2017 to July 2018. Did the same PowerScore review class twice (+ self-study) and my score got lower the second time around (Yikes). Untimed, my score is in the 160s so I feel like I have it in me to understand this test. I'm not sure what my problem is. I've been trying very, very hard. I guess I sort of burned out. I absolutely want to apply in this application cycle (because of a lot of factors) and I want to know if I am hopeless or what.

My school choices are (1) Osgoode (2) Queens (3) Ottawa (4) Windsor

GPA: 3.65; (B2): 3.7+ Really good references and ECs (well-- I think so)

LSAT HISTORY: 
Sept 2017: 152

July 2018: 147

Registered for Oct 2018 (International)

I have between now and October to give it another shot. Is there any benefit to applying early with my 152, or would taking the October LSAT (with one month's worth of additional LSAT review, on top of the year's worth I've put into it) be worth a shot? Perhaps I could just dig into the games and get a slight bump? 

Anyways, I'll try to keep this thread updated next year when I find out the results. Thanks and good luck to all the other desperate souls out there.

 

I wouldn’t bother unless and until you can get a significantly better practice score within the time, and I wouldn’t rush to apply this year. After a year and a half of studying, I would think you’d see an upward trend if there was going to be one. 

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In case it helps those who have more up-to-date knowledge of LSAT prep perseverance, I note that OP is clearly determined given (s)he is considering one of the International October LSAT administrations (Oct. 6 in Europe/Middle East/Africa or Oct. 14 in Asia/Australia/NZ).

My comment is that, unless OP is already on location well in advance, I would anticipate significant additional challenges for a jet-legged test-taker who considers flying across time zones to a far-away test location within the few days prior to the test.

Slightly off-topic: these international administrations (& the Puerto Rico off-schedule ones) do allow for additional kicks at the can for those who can afford it, especially now that the 3-test limit has been eliminated.

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I can't comment on whether you should or shouldn't take the test this year. I can say that I took the test 5 different times and ended up getting in to law school on my second attempt. My first go was in my final year of undergrad and a fair bit of studying (though, admittedly, it wasn't that well thought out). I ended up with a 152.  That was when I had to wait again a couple years for a retake. During that time period I went to grad school and, obviously, got older and matured a bit. My second go at taking the LSAT was a major difference. Things just clicked easier. So I think something can be said for playing the long game on the LSAT and learning how to take the test.

 

So my advice to you I guess would be don't feel like it's the end of the world. I think the LSAT is absolutely a learnable test.

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19 minutes ago, FunnyLawName said:

I can't comment on whether you should or shouldn't take the test this year. I can say that I took the test 5 different times and ended up getting in to law school on my second attempt. My first go was in my final year of undergrad and a fair bit of studying (though, admittedly, it wasn't that well thought out). I ended up with a 152.  That was when I had to wait again a couple years for a retake. During that time period I went to grad school and, obviously, got older and matured a bit. My second go at taking the LSAT was a major difference. Things just clicked easier. So I think something can be said for playing the long game on the LSAT and learning how to take the test.

 

So my advice to you I guess would be don't feel like it's the end of the world. I think the LSAT is absolutely a learnable test.

Really Good Points. 

To add, I too took time off from the first writing after my undergrad (where I was surgically demolished). A number of years passed before I went back and rewrote the test, after some life and work experience. My scores went up very noticeably. Now mind you, I prepared for the test far more thoroughly later on, but maybe that was a product of maturation...

Regardless of your choice. best of luck to you.  

So, even if things don't work out now. In 2-4 years, you may be in a different place and more capable of tackling it. So, FunnyLawName is right. Don't get to worked up about it. 

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I can’t tell if OP is flying to another country to write the LSAT or not (original post didn’t say) but this seems like a really unnecessary step just to get in a relatively early write. November (domestic) is just as good.

Having said that, I think you should find out where your weaknesses are, work on those, then write again if/when your PT scores improve. Otherwise, it’s just another money sink (and a huge one at that if you’re also buying a plane ticket).

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4 hours ago, Psychometronic said:

I can’t tell if OP is flying to another country to write the LSAT or not (original post didn’t say) but this seems like a really unnecessary step just to get in a relatively early write. November (domestic) is just as good.

Having said that, I think you should find out where your weaknesses are, work on those, then write again if/when your PT scores improve. Otherwise, it’s just another money sink (and a huge one at that if you’re also buying a plane ticket).

OP may be in Asia visiting or teaching

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On 9/9/2018 at 6:17 AM, schoolisforever said:

Hello! Longtime lurker, first time posting here.

I probably know the answer deep down inside, but I still wanted to ask... should I retake?

I've been studying pretty much continuously for the LSAT from March 2017 to July 2018. Did the same PowerScore review class twice (+ self-study) and my score got lower the second time around (Yikes). Untimed, my score is in the 160s so I feel like I have it in me to understand this test. I'm not sure what my problem is. I've been trying very, very hard. I guess I sort of burned out. I absolutely want to apply in this application cycle (because of a lot of factors) and I want to know if I am hopeless or what.

My school choices are (1) Osgoode (2) Queens (3) Ottawa (4) Windsor

GPA: 3.65; (B2): 3.7+ Really good references and ECs (well-- I think so)

LSAT HISTORY: 
Sept 2017: 152

July 2018: 147

Registered for Oct 2018 (International)

I have between now and October to give it another shot. Is there any benefit to applying early with my 152, or would taking the October LSAT (with one month's worth of additional LSAT review, on top of the year's worth I've put into it) be worth a shot? Perhaps I could just dig into the games and get a slight bump? 

Anyways, I'll try to keep this thread updated next year when I find out the results. Thanks and good luck to all the other desperate souls out there.

 

I wrote the LSAT three times and I currently at Osgoode. My first 2 scores were very similar to yours, and it wasn't until my third write that I got a 164. You have the GPA, but now you gotta bring up that lsat at least 6-7 points to have a chance.

 

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