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2L Summer (2019) Recruit PFOs/ITCs

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Does anyone else feel nervous about the people theyre meeting? Like partners who clerked at the supreme court ...cmon.... 

 

:|

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They're partners in a law firm. They're just boring people that push paper for a living. There's no need to get nervous meeting any of them.

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35 minutes ago, Fizzlinlaw said:

Does anyone else feel nervous about the people theyre meeting? Like partners who clerked at the supreme court ...cmon.... 

 

:|

No more reason to feel nervous about meeting them then any other human being. No reason to feel nervous about meeting anyone.

 

 

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1 minute ago, greenbackboogie said:

Are follow-up interviews usually the same length as the initial ones, or is it likely that a firm would request a shorter/longer timeslot? 

They’re usually the same length, but can be a bit more free-flowing and may run late if you don’t say you have to leave at a certain time. 

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Depends on the firm. At some firms, the second interviews are slotted to be shorter and mirror the first set almost identically. Then you might have more "soft" interview time where people take you for coffee, or you ask to meet more people and (if they like you) they accommodate, etc.

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It's 4 PM on the Friday before so if you're going to ask might as well. On the flip side, it doesn't really matter who they are. If you know their practice group you can ask them some questions and you don't even need to know their names to do that. There's nothing on their profile that matters because it's not your job to interview them. They're interviewing you.

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2 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

It's 4 PM on the Friday before so if you're going to ask might as well. On the flip side, it doesn't really matter who they are. If you know their practice group you can ask them some questions and you don't even need to know their names to do that. There's nothing on their profile that matters because it's not your job to interview them. They're interviewing you.

In the past week I've gotten advice from at least half a dozen people to make sure you look up your interviewers before the interview! 

I'm not saying it's good advice. Just so many others stressed its importance to me. 

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36 minutes ago, feraenaturae said:

In the past week I've gotten advice from at least half a dozen people to make sure you look up your interviewers before the interview! 

I'm not saying it's good advice. Just so many others stressed its importance to me. 

I’ve been told this as well but I’m not sure how useful it will be to learn every single detail about the person. If you start talking to them about securities and they’re in labour and employment law you may lose some points. 

I imagine that knowing their background will help you shoot the shit but in my opinion you can talk about nonsense like an ordinary human without knowing every detail about your interviewer... or at least I hope I can. Feet don’t fail me now.

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A law firm profile shows the following:

Their name
What school they went to
When they went to school
When they were called
Practice area
Representative transactions
(Depends on the firm) Publications

You don't need to know anything beyond their name and perhaps their practice area to carry a conversation during recruitment. If they went to the same school, it will come up. In any event, a good life/work tip - don't slag a school/firm in any event, doesn't matter whether or not a person went/worked there.

I looked up the people I interviewed with when I did it and almost immediately forgot anything I had previously learned. My host told me all I needed to know (name, practice area) and because he was a good host, gave me some tips about what this or that person was like (or interests, since me, my host and one or two of my interviewers all liked basketball).

At most, knowing your interviewer allows you to ask the question "I saw you worked on X. Tell me about that?" which is an okay question. A better one is "tell me what it's like to work in your group", "what is your most memorable litigation/transaction", "what kind of files do you get to work on" etc. You don't really need to say "hey I see you argued this case" or "hey I saw you worked on this IPO" to get that conversation started. In fact, a lot of my work doesn't show up on my profile in anything more than one line in my description. Also maybe that transaction I have on my profile sucked and I hate talking about it.

Just relax. Have a conversation, be prepared to talk about yourself in an engaging manner, be knowledgeable regarding your resume and try and build a rapport with your interviewer.

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2 hours ago, FingersCr0ssed said:

I’ve been told this as well but I’m not sure how useful it will be to learn every single detail about the person. If you start talking to them about securities and they’re in labour and employment law you may lose some points. 

I imagine that knowing their background will help you shoot the shit but in my opinion you can talk about nonsense like an ordinary human without knowing every detail about your interviewer... or at least I hope I can. Feet don’t fail me now.

You've got the right idea. Practice area is about the only relevant item and if you have a good host or the interviewer does a good job introducing themselves, you don't even need to know it beforehand.

Looking at my profile is not going to help you shoot the shit with me. I like my work and don't mind talking about it, but I'd prefer to get to know the candidate in front of me and talk about non-work stuff, which won't be on my profile.

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I'm assuming most law firms have a place to check in coats/bags at their firms for the interviews, but is it acceptable to bring your bag to a dinner or reception?

I'm going to be taking the Go-Train into Toronto, and so I don't have a hotel/place where I can store it. 

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Just a heads up to anyone who isn't aware, half of my "2nd" interviews effectively ended up being meal/coffee/drinks meetings. Don't be surprised if a firm asks to take you out to lunch rather than bringing you in for a 2nd interview. Treat it just as you would an interview, be polite, conversational, etc. Obviously still try to enjoy the meal (I certainly did!) but do keep in mind that you' are still right in the recruit tornado. 

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Seriously? Just leave your bag anywhere it's convenient and collect it later. If there's a coat/bag check, use that. If not, leave it in a corner or under a char. Like you would any other time you go out and have stuff with you.

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I see no problem with it. I can't imagine anyone would. I almost always had a suitcase/umbrella/coat on me during recruit. There should be some kind of reception desk that will hold it for you.

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Best of luck with tomorrow everyone! Remember, these lawyers are all just people and this process isn’t the end all and be all so don’t psych yourselves out!

These firms wouldn’t be interviewing you if they didn’t already really like you so have confidence going in!

Wear comfortable shoes and bring a little granola bar type snack that you can eat in a pinch if you have a full day. 

That’s all Ive got. Knock ‘em dead kiddos 

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Not that I have been lucky enough to receive any second interviews yet, but in case I do: does anyone know if the nature of second in-firm government interviews (e.g. DOJ/PPSC) is different than their first in-firm interviews (and OCIs for that matter)?

The OCIs were substantive and the first in-firms were as well. I am pretty exhausted and have no idea what left to study/prepare - my hope is that the second day of in-firms will be less formal and more social. 

Also: what really is the function of the second interviews? Do places cut a significant amount of candidates after the second interview? E.g. 4:1 candidate to hire ratio going into the first in-firm, 2:1 going into the second interview, then final decisions? 

Edited by Muskiehunter

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