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September 8 LSAT

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I enrolled for the September LSAT a few month ago, literally the day registration opened! I have been studying moderately the past two months. Now, as the day is nearing I do not know if I am prepared. I also do not know if it is just me feeling nervous. I have purchased the powerscore bibles and am almost done the LR and started LG, but have not touched RC. I have also done only maybe 3-4 practice tests. I originally enrolled for the LSAT as a trial just to know what to expect, but now I am scared if I do bad and even though I would retake I would not want this score to effect my future. If anyone has advice, wither on how to study or on if I should consider paying extra to change the date, please help! 

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For most schools, you won't have to worry about a low first score. I think only UofA cares about previous LSAT attempts. For most others, your highest score is what matters. That being said, you should aim for the highest score you can get on your first try.

What was your diagnostic score, if you did one? 

With a month away, what's got me worried is that you're only just now starting RC and LG, and you've been studying "moderately" for two months now. Are you getting near perfect on every LR section, or trying to get near perfect or something? You shouldn't worry about getting -0 on every section, but ensuring that you can get a good score that you're happy with, and will get you into law school. That means you can't focus 2 months on LR, and cram LG/RC into just over a month. Especially because LG is by far the easiest section to perfect, in my opinion. At this point, you should be doing 2-3 PTs per week, and reviewing/blind reviewing each of them. 

 A low first test score won't matter, it's just that subsequent attempts cost both money and time. Some more details would work wonders in being able to provide more directed advice. 

Edited by LegalArmada
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16 minutes ago, LegalArmada said:

For most schools, you won't have to worry about a low first score. I think only UofA cares about previous LSAT attempts. For most others, your highest score is what matters. That being said, you should aim for the highest score you can get on your first try.

What was your diagnostic score, if you did one? 

With a month away, what's got me worried is that you're only just now starting RC and LG, and you've been studying "moderately" for two months now. Are you getting near perfect on every LR section, or trying to get near perfect or something? You shouldn't worry about getting -0 on every section, but ensuring that you can get a good score that you're happy with, and will get you into law school. That means you can't focus 2 months on LR, and cram LG/RC into just over a month. Especially because LG is by far the easiest section to perfect, in my opinion. At this point, you should be doing 2-3 PTs per week, and reviewing/blind reviewing each of them. 

 A low first test score won't matter, it's just that subsequent attempts cost both money and time. Some more details would work wonders in being able to provide more directed advice. 

I appreciate all your advice. My first PT score was a 155, but for that practice test after every 7 questions I would look back and check my answers, but I never copied an answer and marked fairly. So although I think it is representative of my "raw score" I am not so sure. My goal score is also a 160. The reason why I have just started LG is because that has been my highest scoring section, so I think I know it pretty well. Also, I have seen some articles on blinds review but am not sure if I am understanding it correctly. Is the method, just to do a full practice test without checking answers and then going back and marking it? Thanks again!

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Okay, so that mark isn't really going to effectively demonstrate a baseline score, but it doesn't matter. Diagnostics really aren't that important anyway. 

----

For PTs, assuming you do blind review, you should, at this point, but moving on to full, realistically-timed tests.

Say I was going to attempt PT 71. I would begin with section one, time out 35 minutes, and complete the section. Just as you would on the real test. Then immediately do section two and three, with a 10 minute break, followed by section 4 (or a 5th from an earlier test that you haven't done if you want to practice with experimentals). Then take a break, maybe an hour or so. During the test, you want to star questions you're not 100% confident in. Still answer them as you would, but note that you weren't 100% sure.

Now, after the test, go back and review every single starred question. Don't look at the answer. Take as much time as you want to figure out the answer until you're 100% confident. Ask yourself WHY you chose that answer now, versus why you chose it during the test. Did you run out of time, did you get caught up in a trick answer choice, did you just misread the question, etc.

Now score the whole thing. Then, go back and review it. Check everything you got wrong (especially ones you DIDN'T star), and figure out what happened. Compare the answer you gave on the attempt versus your blind review. 

I used to do something like this, which got me a 166. Adjust your schedule as per work/life impediments. And please, don't overexert yourself. Burnout is real on the LSAT, and it's probably what held me back from a higher score (was exhausted on test day). 

Monday: PT + a bit of review.

Tuesday: Complete Monday's PT review, and do some other practice stuff. '

Wednesday PT (repeat Tuesday on Thursday instead)

Friday: another PT

Repeat Tuesday on Saturday/Sunday, feel free to take a day or two off as well. 

Feel free to PM if you want :) ! 

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1 hour ago, LegalArmada said:

For most schools, you won't have to worry about a low first score. I think only UofA cares about previous LSAT attempts. For most others, your highest score is what matters. That being said, you should aim for the highest score you can get on your first try.

What was your diagnostic score, if you did one? 

With a month away, what's got me worried is that you're only just now starting RC and LG, and you've been studying "moderately" for two months now. Are you getting near perfect on every LR section, or trying to get near perfect or something? You shouldn't worry about getting -0 on every section, but ensuring that you can get a good score that you're happy with, and will get you into law school. That means you can't focus 2 months on LR, and cram LG/RC into just over a month. Especially because LG is by far the easiest section to perfect, in my opinion. At this point, you should be doing 2-3 PTs per week, and reviewing/blind reviewing each of them. 

 A low first test score won't matter, it's just that subsequent attempts cost both money and time. Some more details would work wonders in being able to provide more directed advice. 

Agreed re: LG is the easiest to perfect. But it's also the biggest "what the fuck" when you first start 

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12 hours ago, Inconspicuous said:

Agreed re: LG is the easiest to perfect. But it's also the biggest "what the fuck" when you first start 

I'm about to take my second LSAT in September and LG is still my biggest "what the fuck"

Though now that the September is fast approaching I am starting to score lower on LR and RC...fml

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14 hours ago, thedraper said:

I'm about to take my second LSAT in September and LG is still my biggest "what the fuck"

Though now that the September is fast approaching I am starting to score lower on LR and RC...fml

A lot of LG is about finding the methods that work for you. I tried PowerScore, and even Princeton Review, 7Sage, etc. Eventually I took the most useful methods for me out of each them, and spliced them to what worked best for me. By the end, I was easily getting -1/2 on every LG section I did. 

Regarding scoring lower on RC and LR, I found that I was burning out if I studied 'too much,' and that my score would decrease because of this. Perhaps something to consider in your situation? 

If you want, feel free to PM me. 

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13 hours ago, LegalArmada said:

A lot of LG is about finding the methods that work for you. I tried PowerScore, and even Princeton Review, 7Sage, etc. Eventually I took the most useful methods for me out of each them, and spliced them to what worked best for me. By the end, I was easily getting -1/2 on every LG section I did. 

Regarding scoring lower on RC and LR, I found that I was burning out if I studied 'too much,' and that my score would decrease because of this. Perhaps something to consider in your situation? 

If you want, feel free to PM me. 

the man (woman? not to assume) speaks the truth! i went through a really bad burnout in mid june because of studying too much  LR, and my scores dipped for that reason. I took a break for 2 weeks and when i went back my scores were higher than they were prior to burnout. you really do yourself a disservice by not allowing your brain to rest and absorb your new problem solving processes. 

 

that being said, a 2 week break isn't feasible in august, so heres what i do- a prep test once, maybe twice a week, blind review it the same or next day. the day after that, i grab a different preptest, and just work on LG as it doesn't require much reading, and is by far my weakest section. 

 

i write in september as well, feel free to pm if you wanna shoot the shit about test taking strategies

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