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spaceman

Law school after dental school?

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I'm interested in law and would like to go to law school, partly for fun and partly to open new career options. Is this a good idea? Did anyone here do something like this? Also, are there any law schools that allow you to study part-time while working full-time in another career (dentistry in my case)?

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1 minute ago, spaceman said:

I'm interested in law and would like to go to law school, partly for fun and partly to open new career options. Is this a good idea? Did anyone here do something like this? Also, are there any law schools that allow you to study part-time while working full-time in another career (dentistry in my case)?

Must be nice to have 100k to blow on a part-time law degree over a 6-year period. People have done it. See here - http://forums.premed101.com/topic/80946-law-school/

Though, it's mainly done to switch from one career to another. If you want to work in the dental field, then a law degree won't help, and vice-versa. 

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Osgoode has a part-time ("Extended Time") program, though I caution you it's not part time in the sense that you have evening classes that you attend after working for the day. You follow the same course schedule as other students, except you take fewer courses. I do know that you can pick and choose courses from different sections to make things more convenient though (e.g. trying to have all your classes on 1-2 days).

I believe the Extended-Time program is for people with extenuating circumstances (e.g. childcare responsibilities), but you can certainly contact the school and ask. 

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1 hour ago, spaceman said:

I'm interested in law and would like to go to law school, partly for fun and partly to open new career options. Is this a good idea? Did anyone here do something like this? Also, are there any law schools that allow you to study part-time while working full-time in another career (dentistry in my case)?

You have a weak imagination if law school is the most fun way you can come up with to blow 100 grand.

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I am doing what you’re proposing, applying to law school after another career.   I have discussed it with several lawyers that I know, some early and some late in their career, and the more I research it, the more confident I am that’s it going to be a VERY fun, and useful, way to blow $100,000. 

But you will have a hard time finding a law school that will let you do it part time, especially the first year. 

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19 hours ago, Deadpool said:

Must be nice to have 100k to blow on a part-time law degree over a 6-year period. People have done it. See here - http://forums.premed101.com/topic/80946-law-school/

Though, it's mainly done to switch from one career to another. If you want to work in the dental field, then a law degree won't help, and vice-versa. 

I'm mostly just interested in working in law part-time, but yeah there really isn't any synergy between law and dentistry.

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11 minutes ago, spaceman said:

I'm mostly just interested in working in law part-time, but yeah there really isn't any synergy between law and dentistry.

No law firm, government division, or in-house counsel will hire a part-time lawyer (unless they specifically ask for one). If you're talking about being an independent legal consultant, then maybe, but that's a lot of money and time just to become an independent consultant. Have you considered part-time master's in public policy programs or MBA programs instead? That could open some doors with your dentistry degree as well. 

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If you have time and money to "waste" there's absolutely no harm in this plan. I mean, I share in the visceral reaction against this plan as something that makes any kind of economic sense, and I understand why we use the term "waste," but there are people with quite a lot of money and time they can do whatever they want with. As compared with buying an expensive sports car and just being a bum for several years at a time, there's certainly nothing wrong with going to law school out of interest and as an experience. If that's what you want, and if you've got the money to burn and the time to invest, then sure, go for it.

But no, it makes no real sense in terms of having a productive career. In the end, you'll be a lawyer or a dentist. You won't be both.

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1 hour ago, Deadpool said:

No law firm, government division, or in-house counsel will hire a part-time lawyer (unless they specifically ask for one). If you're talking about being an independent legal consultant, then maybe, but that's a lot of money and time just to become an independent consultant. Have you considered part-time master's in public policy programs or MBA programs instead? That could open some doors with your dentistry degree as well. 

There’s a significant and growing number of part time legal positions as the legal industry adapts to changes in technology and tries to better accommodate women, to say nothing of the ability to set up a solo part-time practice (@epeeist). There are even quite a few “gig-economy” legal positions, for lack of a better word. 

The bigger barrier to entry would be articling. Some people find part time articles, but they have to be specifically approved by the law society and are pretty rare. 

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28 minutes ago, Diplock said:

If you have time and money to "waste" there's absolutely no harm in this plan.

There isn't? Depending on the area of practice, I could see harm arising from practicing law as a part-time hobby. I mean, I guess OP could either confine their practice to something simple and unchanging, or keep up with legal developments /develop the necessary skills for competence. But setting-out to dabble is weird. If I knew that someone only ever practiced as a hobby, I don't know that I'd entrust important legal affairs to them. 

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There are some pretty misguided ideas people have out there but this has to be the worst I have ever heard of. 

Nursing to law might make sense, but dentist to law school makes zero sense.

If you got 100k and time, just take 30k and travel the world for 3-4 months, and take the other 70k and put it in various quality promising ICOs and crypto blockchain projects. You'll be a lot wealthier in 3-4 years and also a heck of a lot happier too.

I predict leaving you existing career and going to law school out of boredom will just lead to financial misery, depression, anxiety, and several wasted years that you will never get back. What a waste.

Whatever your current problems are (boredom, mid life crisis, too much money, too much time, etc), going to law school is NEVER the wise decision.

 

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To answer your logistical question, to my knowledge (as a 0L), yes, there are schools that allow students to study part-time while holding down a job. That said, there are no Canadian law schools that offer a program that is fully compatible with someone who works full-time during standard business hours. The vast majority of required classes at any law school are scheduled during the day, so you'd have to have a very flexible work schedule to attend class. 

I can't imagine that there's a way that you could pull this off without compromising your current career.  Even if you somehow get a study arrangement that works for you, in order to practice law part-time (the viability of which I'm definitely not qualified to comment on), you'd have to initially practice full-time. Part-time articling positions, to my understanding, are exceedingly rare. 

Are you down to commit 6-8 years of your life outside of work to land a side gig that will probably never yield a ROI? If so, that's cool, and I wish you the best of luck. Being confident in that decision sincerely sounds like an awesome place to be in life. 

Edited by jan
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On ‎2018‎-‎07‎-‎27 at 8:07 PM, spaceman said:

I'm interested in law and would like to go to law school, partly for fun and partly to open new career options. Is this a good idea? Did anyone here do something like this? Also, are there any law schools that allow you to study part-time while working full-time in another career (dentistry in my case)?

You could work as a Crown.  :) 

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6 minutes ago, Captain Courageous said:

You could work as a Crown.  :) 

Thought I misread initially. You didn't say Clown right?

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Thanks for the perspectives everybody. I feel that working as a dentist and lawyer simultaneously isn't a good idea financially nor very practical and that law school would be too much of a hassle to pursue as a "hobby". As someone else mentioned, I've been looking into MBA programs for some time and I'll probably go for one as I think they are better as they complement dentistry better, are shorter in duration and offer more flexibility (ie. evening classes).

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On 7/29/2018 at 1:38 PM, spaceman said:

Thanks for the perspectives everybody. I feel that working as a dentist and lawyer simultaneously isn't a good idea financially nor very practical and that law school would be too much of a hassle to pursue as a "hobby". As someone else mentioned, I've been looking into MBA programs for some time and I'll probably go for one as I think they are better as they complement dentistry better, are shorter in duration and offer more flexibility (ie. evening classes).

Marketing, management, and training courses might be worth looking into if you are seeking something that will complement a dental practice. Marketing if you are looking to grow your clinic, whereas management/training courses can help reduce overhead (though I guess revenue here really only comes down to the efficiency of the dental hygienists you hire for scaling/cleanings by minimizing the time you need to spend with patients).

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On 7/28/2018 at 3:59 PM, Diplock said:

If you have time and money to "waste" there's absolutely no harm in this plan. I mean, I share in the visceral reaction against this plan as something that makes any kind of economic sense, and I understand why we use the term "waste," but there are people with quite a lot of money and time they can do whatever they want with. As compared with buying an expensive sports car and just being a bum for several years at a time, there's certainly nothing wrong with going to law school out of interest and as an experience. If that's what you want, and if you've got the money to burn and the time to invest, then sure, go for it.

But no, it makes no real sense in terms of having a productive career. In the end, you'll be a lawyer or a dentist. You won't be both.

While I generally agree, and don't think it a good idea to go to law school intending not to practice law full-time, I knew some people who did that - they could afford to, why not? I wish legal education were less expensive and more available. I know people who for the sake of interest pursue degrees in history or theology or whatever, with no intent to do any work related to their degree that's unrelated to their career, why not in law (if they can afford it and have no unrealistic expectations)? It's not their fault that (for multiple reasons) it's so difficult to get into law school here as compared to a country in which it's a normal undergrad degree, I don't agree with the notion that they're depriving someone else of a spot - they're not, the law schools and law societies and lawyers and society choose to make it restrictive (and expensive).

I've met a few people who were physicians who became lawyers and continued to practice in both professions. Though as I recall they were successful enough as physicians that their search for articles was essentially, just ask a friend at a large firm that sees a potential advantage to a future relationship. And they either saw a synergy or were successful enough they could make one.

See e.g.:

http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/article-template-biography.page?doc=dr-john-m-bonn-md-llb/hlrp4hmi

Or in the US, I've met one or two physician lawyers who worked in medical malpractice (though I think they preferred expert witness work as a physician to the practice of law). So per @Waterfall2021 it might work, though one would be (unfairly) unpopular with other dentists...

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On ‎29‎/‎07‎/‎2018 at 3:38 PM, spaceman said:

Thanks for the perspectives everybody. I feel that working as a dentist and lawyer simultaneously isn't a good idea financially nor very practical and that law school would be too much of a hassle to pursue as a "hobby". As someone else mentioned, I've been looking into MBA programs for some time and I'll probably go for one as I think they are better as they complement dentistry better, are shorter in duration and offer more flexibility (ie. evening classes).

Honestly, great choice.

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