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Abii

Which Fees Can We Opt-Out From?

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Obviously we can opt-out of health/dental, but what else? I found a few student union links that weren't really helpful. Here are all the fees we have to pay for Fall 2018:

Misc_Fees_Fall_18.jpg

That student health and wellness fee seems like bs. 370 dollars for 6 semesters. Can we opt-out of that one? In undergrad our SU would bring cats for cuddling so we could supposedly de-stress. This health and wellness thing has the same bs feel to it. 

What else can we opt-out of?
 

Edited by Abii

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If you go through the tuition calculator and highlight over the "i" it will tell you what you can opt out of

https://apps.admissions.ualberta.ca/costcalculator/static/public/index.html#

Not like it's worth the effort though, you can't opt out of anything else. 

 

Edit: Actually I might be wrong, despite saying "Opt out: No"  the student union website has a page that suggests something different. I'm still inclined to believe successfully opting out of anything but health/dental is difficult and rare

https://su.ualberta.ca/about/budgetsfees/optouts/

 

 

 

Edited by Toad
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Without speaking from a position of proper knowledge, my experience is that these are almost always proposed and voted upon (either by student council or referendum) that makes it basically impossible to opt out of. I've only really seen donation fees and health/dental insurance as having opt outs.

Regardless, just pay the fees. Realistically, the $370 is basically nothing in the grand scheme of things, and I'm sure some truly benefit from it, maybe you will too. It also makes it cheaper for everyone else. If you (or anyone reading this) don't have any background in economics, just read through this Wikipedia article for a quick reason to not opt out, even if you can: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-rider_problem

 

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1 hour ago, RNGesus said:

Without speaking from a position of proper knowledge, my experience is that these are almost always proposed and voted upon (either by student council or referendum) that makes it basically impossible to opt out of. I've only really seen donation fees and health/dental insurance as having opt outs.

Regardless, just pay the fees. Realistically, the $370 is basically nothing in the grand scheme of things, and I'm sure some truly benefit from it, maybe you will too. It also makes it cheaper for everyone else. If you (or anyone reading this) don't have any background in economics, just read through this Wikipedia article for a quick reason to not opt out, even if you can: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-rider_problem

 

I understand what you're saying, but my issue is with the useless nonsense that a lot of these student unions waste money on. Our own student union is almost certainly good and I wouldn't want to opt out of their programs and fees, but the university-wide student union activities/programs is what I have a problem with. Wasting money on kittens during exam time is one example (this was at my old uni). 

But you're right, not worth the effort I guess. Already over it haha

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I recall getting an email with opt out options early last year. Just basically had to check some boxes.

 

And FYI the kittens during exams thing isn't just university-wide. Pretty sure the LSA does it too.

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If I recall, we get an email in september notifying us of all the fees we can opt out of. 

Also, the Faculty of Law has its own Mental Health and Wellness Committee, who put on a ton of events and offer ways for students to de-stress during the year. You'll hear more at orientation/first week back.

Law school, and 1L in particular, can take a toll on your mental health, and everyone needs different supports/ways to relax. The dogs may not be your "thing," but remember - it might be what keeps someone else going when they're having a rough day/week - and when you need some support, you'll be glad that its there.

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On 7/27/2018 at 12:25 AM, RNGesus said:

Without speaking from a position of proper knowledge, my experience is that these are almost always proposed and voted upon (either by student council or referendum) that makes it basically impossible to opt out of. I've only really seen donation fees and health/dental insurance as having opt outs.

Regardless, just pay the fees. Realistically, the $370 is basically nothing in the grand scheme of things, and I'm sure some truly benefit from it, maybe you will too. It also makes it cheaper for everyone else. If you (or anyone reading this) don't have any background in economics, just read through this Wikipedia article for a quick reason to not opt out, even if you can: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-rider_problem

 

You should always opt out of as many SU fees as you can that are optional. SU is dead weight and does nothing except waste money. Same with the university admin.

Edited by StudentLife

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On 7/27/2018 at 12:46 PM, LadyOfLaw said:

If I recall, we get an email in september notifying us of all the fees we can opt out of. 

Also, the Faculty of Law has its own Mental Health and Wellness Committee, who put on a ton of events and offer ways for students to de-stress during the year. You'll hear more at orientation/first week back.

Law school, and 1L in particular, can take a toll on your mental health, and everyone needs different supports/ways to relax. The dogs may not be your "thing," but remember - it might be what keeps someone else going when they're having a rough day/week - and when you need some support, you'll be glad that its there.

Best way to de-stress (or not get stressed in the first place) is to stay away from the law building and bubble as much as possible. Toxic. Mental Health and Wellness Committee is the most useless thing ever and another waste of money. Adult Colouring is their major activity, LOL.

How about offer more practitioner electives and stop curving so harshly causing people to fail. Just switch to pass/fail like med does and most stress is gone since no more GPA worries.

Edited by StudentLife
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On 8/4/2018 at 8:44 AM, StudentLife said:

Best way to de-stress (or not get stressed in the first place) is to stay away from the law building and bubble as much as possible. Toxic. Mental Health and Wellness Committee is the most useless thing ever and another waste of money. Adult Colouring is their major activity, LOL.

How about offer more practitioner electives and stop curving so harshly causing people to fail. Just switch to pass/fail like med does and most stress is gone since no more GPA worries.

lol I know people are different and we all respond to different things in life, but no matter how hard I try to put myself in someone else's shoes, I can't fathom how adult colouring/cat cuddling is supposed to help a person. If anything, mentally, you have to be in a really positive place not to throw the colouring book out the window if you're an adult. If I'm pissed off about my daily affairs and sitting around colouring pieces of paper I'd just get 100 times more pissed off. It's not even a band-aid solution, it makes you feel worse.  

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