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SiDtHeKiD

Honest Opinions Needed

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5 hours ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

Those stats for the admitted applicants who accepted their offers, not all accepted applicants. It's not like only 160 people were admitted lol. 

You're right, I should have specified that. Although I'm not sure how much that would impact my point that a very tiny minority of admits shared similar statistics.

1 hour ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

This would put my CGPA to between 3.2 and 3.3. I understand that is low, but isn't a 167 score higher than normal, putting me in a somewhat competitive spot? What about schools like UofC or UofS or UVic or OttawaU? What are my chances like in those schools? Does it even really matter what kind of law school you go to so long as you secure article towards the end of your degree?

I haven't looked much into U of C, O of S, UVic, or Ottawa, but I imagine those schools would be reasonable targets. A 90th percentile or higher LSAT would definitely strengthen your application, yes. It's awesome that your practice tests are as high as they are, congratulations. 

That said, If I were in your position, I would probably focus way more on bringing up my GPA than putting much more effort into a high LSAT score, especially if you're practice testing above the median for many schools. If you can pull your last two years up to a 3.6 or 3.7, you'd definitely get into the schools you listed in this post, and maybe some of the ones in your original post, as well. If it's possible to exceed your credit limit and take an extra year, that is often an option presented on this forum for people in similar circumstances. 

I can't speak to the last two sentences of this paragraph, since I'm a 0L, but there are plenty of threads on the forum posing similar career questions! Sorry about that. 

1 hour ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

I want to understand what you meant by the "5/160 regular category admits" comment. Could you please elaborate?

Of 160 people who accepted offers at U of A for the 2017-18 entering class, only 5 had a GPA similar to yours. This is at the school with arguably the most lenient admissions requirements of the ones that you listed in your original post. I just wanted to bring some numbers into why I was making the claim that I was. 

1 hour ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

What type of biographical information would be relevant? I came here in 08 from Pakistan. Home and family situation is very complicated and I'd rather not share it here but could you please tell what factors are relevant? What are not? What can I do to better my profile on that front?

As somebody else said, different schools have different access policies, so I would advise you to look into that if you are interested in that route. Maybe you do qualify at some schools. 

To my understanding, generally, access applicants are those who faced major systemic barriers (because of class, racial identity, disability, gender, sexual orientation, etc.) or, for some schools, difficult situations (extreme financial burden, family crises, major health issues, for example), that significantly limited their lifetime academic performance. In general, access categories cater to applicants who have faced extreme and unusual circumstances that proved to be a massive and insurmountable barrier to academic success. 

I'm not so sure if being an immigrant, working and supporting a family through university, or dealing with family crises while studying are necessarily extreme or unusual. Those are all pretty common circumstances for a lot of Canadian students (including myself for all three of them, actually) that do not necessarily limit academic performance potential. That said, I don't know your story, and I would never expect you to share something so deeply personal on a public forum. It is very possible that you do qualify, and if so, that's awesome! This forum is a good resource for deliberating that call, but I would recommend relying on actual admissions policies to guide the decision of which category to apply under. 

 

Edited by jan

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1 hour ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

Oui. 

Queen's is B2. Western is L2. Dal is L2/CGPA, whichever is higher. I applied very widely and so I've memorised a lot of this stuff.

Queen's generally has a 3.4 cGPA cutoff, even if they place an emphasis on B2. Their average cGPA for the last couple of years has hovered in the 3.5-3.55 range. See here. I remember when I applied to law school a few years ago and was told by a Queen's admissions officer that you still needed a cGPA in this range to be competitive. 

https://law.queensu.ca/jd-admissions/admission-information/class-profile

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15 minutes ago, Simbaa said:

Queen's generally has a 3.4 cGPA cutoff, even if they place an emphasis on B2. Their average cGPA for the last couple of years has hovered in the 3.5-3.55 range. See here. I remember when I applied to law school a few years ago and was told by a Queen's admissions officer that you still needed a cGPA in this range to be competitive. 

https://law.queensu.ca/jd-admissions/admission-information/class-profile

They changed their policy for the just ended cycle, i.e. 2018 entry. They now only look at B2, as far as GPA is concerned. The page (https://law.queensu.ca/jd-admissions/admission-information/first-year) makes no reference to CGPA at all for regular applicants. I told OP they'd be competitive because the page I've cited states that a 157 is competitive so if OP has a mid-160s, that should mitigate the impact of their, admittedly predicted, B2 being 0.2 points below the 3.7 that Queen's is asking for.

PS. The link you've cited reflects criteria for the class which just finished 1L. Queen's changed their evaluation policy for the incoming cohort.

Edited by NapoleonBonaparte

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11 hours ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

Can you please tell me what B2, B3 or L2 means? As I mentioned, I'm VERY new to all of this. What I can tell you is that my prediction is that my GPA for my last two years or 20 courses would be between 3.4 to 3.5 according to my calculations. Extremely best case scenario might be 3.55.

I understand with a 3.34 and 162 it might be tough, but what other schools do you think I'd have a fair shot at? What do you mean by uphill battle in admissions process? What would that require? The schools I called around to get information gave me VERY basic information regarding average GPA and LSAT score requirements. What other phases are there for the application?

I don't mind delaying anything. I will be applying in 2019 to attend in sept 2020 and I will be done my last semester in April 2019 so I will have all of summer and fall semester to boost any mark I might need to boost.

What is an access category applicant? What does that require?

Best 2, best 3 and last 2 years, though from reading this thread it seems you got the hang of it! As others have also said, Windsor, Lakehead and maybe Queens are schools you would have a decent shot at. You don't want to go to American or UK schools, especially if you intend to practice in Canada. Which law school you go to in the states very much matters, whereas here in Canada every law school is considered prestigious and ranking them is arbitrary (although the prestige factor is often argued on these forums, I hope not to spark another debate in this thread).

By uphill battle, I mean that as an applicant who is split, you will only be considered after every applicant who wasn't a splitter. As far as we can tell (or it may be complete fabrication), schools create pools of applicants based off of initial scores, and then assess from top to bottom. It also matters when you write your LSAT. A stellar LSAT and a decent gpa before the admissions cycle begins ensure that you will at least be in the first wave of people considered, rather than taking it in february of that cycle and having to wait until potentially August to get an offer. 

As jan explained, an access category applicant is someone who would be a regular applicant, but for extreme circumstances preventing them from performing regularly. I've stated my reason all over this forum so I don't mind giving an example for you here, I'm an access category applicant because of hearing issues. It is pretty easy to establish a link between poor hearing and lower scores, and based off the offers I received I can infer that my reasoning was accepted. Some people on this forum have asked if the death of a loved one during the school year would count as a reason for applying access, and the answer is a resounding no. While heartbreaking, it is not a tragedy, but rather, a part of life. A lot of schools give considerations for immigrants, but again you may have extenuating circumstances that you don't wish to say here (which is perfectly fine!) that could qualify you for it. Think of it this way. Is what you're trying to list for access something that happens to everyone throughout their life? If the answer is yes, it won't get you very far. 

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18 hours ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

Wow this is probably the most reinforcing post I read so far haha. Yes I am working hard to make sure my last 10 remaining courses I knock it out of the park, and get my GPA over my last 20 courses or two years to be as high as 3.5. However, that would still put my CGPA at 3.29.

Wow that's amazing. Was that a 3.09 CGPA or 3.09 in your last two years? What do you mean by fairly late cycle? And that's good to hear about your interview. What did you do that worked so well?

I'm completely open to other schools, however I do ask you does it matter which school you attend for law? If so, how?

What is the reputation for UNB or Manitoba or UVic?

Thank you for your advice with the studying. I can't tell you how much that means!

Additional question: What is your view on schools outside of Canada?

By fairly late cycle, I mean about a month and a bit ago. So I wasn’t a first round draft pick. 

If you want interview advice, I’d be happy to PM you, but it’s fairly useless until you actually have an interview. 

It doesn’t really matter where you go to school, to some extent. You do typically want to go to school where you want to practice. 

Dont worry about reputation. You can’t go wrong with a Canadian law school. Personally, I would stay away from a foreign school, but that’s just me. 

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3 hours ago, LegalArmada said:

So I wasn’t a first round draft pick.

Still might turn out as the steal of the draft haha ;) 

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I'm not sure why UVic is being recommended in the regular category. It doesn't seem likely to me, unless, OP you just have a few a few low grades dragging your down, which would be dropped...but given your predicted L2, doing your best, it seems like your grades are more consistently B/B+, no? After their drops (less than a full year), their median GPA is 3.85 and median LSAT 91st percentile.

I still think you could have an access claim though, and could be accepted to UVic in that category. Supporting a family and economic disadvantage affecting are both mentioned as making an access application. You can call and ask them what kind of documentation of disadvantage they'd need. You'd also have to show you have the aptitude to succeed in law school. A high LSAT score would help there. Good luck! 

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On 7/20/2018 at 1:33 AM, Simbaa said:

Queen's generally has a 3.4 cGPA cutoff, even if they place an emphasis on B2. Their average cGPA for the last couple of years has hovered in the 3.5-3.55 range. See here. I remember when I applied to law school a few years ago and was told by a Queen's admissions officer that you still needed a cGPA in this range to be competitive. 

https://law.queensu.ca/jd-admissions/admission-information/class-profile

I never knew this, but this explains a lot. Before transferring, I applied to Queen's twice with a 3.33cGPA and 3.7 LSAT, waitlisted both times.

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4 hours ago, Trew said:

I never knew this, but this explains a lot. Before transferring, I applied to Queen's twice with a 3.33cGPA and 3.7 LSAT, waitlisted both times.

It's sort of an unsaid requirement that's typically not posted on their website. If you go through the Queen's Law Accepted Threads, you'll notice that not many students below a 3.4 cGPA are admitted. They certainly seem to emphasize this more than other B2/L2 schools like Western and Alberta. So who knows. I just don't think OP can bank on an acceptance there. 

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48 minutes ago, Simbaa said:

It's sort of an unsaid requirement that's typically not posted on their website. If you go through the Queen's Law Accepted Threads, you'll notice that not many students below a 3.4 cGPA are admitted. They certainly seem to emphasize this more than other B2/L2 schools like Western and Alberta. So who knows. I just don't think OP can bank on an acceptance there. 

My LSAT is 1 point below their 154 cutoff but way below their 160 average but l2/b2 almost 0.4 above their average. think i have a shot?

 

1-2 more lsat pts would probably make a massive difference

Edited by stqust

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9 hours ago, feraenaturae said:

I'm not sure why UVic is being recommended in the regular category. It doesn't seem likely to me, unless, OP you just have a few a few low grades dragging your down, which would be dropped...but given your predicted L2, doing your best, it seems like your grades are more consistently B/B+, no? After their drops (less than a full year), their median GPA is 3.85 and median LSAT 91st percentile.

I still think you could have an access claim though, and could be accepted to UVic in that category. Supporting a family and economic disadvantage affecting are both mentioned as making an access application. You can call and ask them what kind of documentation of disadvantage they'd need. You'd also have to show you have the aptitude to succeed in law school. A high LSAT score would help there. Good luck! 

According to my predictions.. I will have out of my last 20 courses? 4-5 B/B+. I got one B.. rest are B+. I got one C in Calculus as I had not done math for a LONG time. the rest are either As or A-s. That puts my L2 to be between 3.4 to 3.5. 3.55 would be the BEST case scenario. My first two years in school, due to many reasons, I had a tough go at it which is my CGPA takes a hit. As I did horrible in my first two years.

What does the UVic look at? Sorry I haven't inquired with them yet. L2, B2, B3, or CGPA?

Edited by SiDtHeKiD

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28 minutes ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

According to my predictions.. I will have out of my last 20 courses? 4-5 B/B+. I got one B.. rest are B+. I got one C in Calculus as I had not done math for a LONG time. the rest are either As or A-s. That puts my L2 to be between 3.4 to 3.5. 3.55 would be the BEST case scenario. My first two years in school, due to many reasons, I had a tough go at it which is my CGPA takes a hit. As I did horrible in my first two years.

What does the UVic look at? Sorry I haven't inquired with them yet. L2, B2, B3, or CGPA?

According to their website, UVic calculates GPA after dropping 18 credits if you have a 4 year degree (120 credits). So that's 6 semester-long classes. I was saying it sounded like your grades were more consistent than varied...drops really help students with a few outlier grades dragging down their GPA, not so much with mostly consistent students. But recalculate after dropping 6 grades, and see where you stand. 

On the other hand, Manitoba and some other schools mentioned here drop a full year or two of courses, and some have lower GPA medians for entry.

Look at all the schools websites or subforums here, find out how they calculate GPA and calculate yours using their formulas. Then see what's usually competitive for entry -- their websites will have this info, the individual school subforums have it, and anything you can find, ask admissions, they should be really helpful. 

I know that's not the point of chances threads I guess, so I think with a solid last year and a really strong LSAT (both easier said than done) you have a good chance of getting in somewhere. 

 

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3 hours ago, stqust said:

My LSAT is 1 point below their 154 cutoff

pretty sure it's a 158 cutoff

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4 minutes ago, Trew said:

pretty sure it's a 158 cutoff

157 in General and 154 in Access

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