Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
SiDtHeKiD

Honest Opinions Needed

Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone,

I’m a 3rd year student at University of Lethbridge doing a Bachelors in Management. Major is Finance. I got 10 courses left in my degree.

my CGPA right now is 3.13. And with the trajectory of no distractions and no other things happening, I should end up with a CGPA of 3.2-3.3 or 3.3-3.4 in my last 20 courses.

I have been working to support myself and my family since I was 14. Taking school full-time and part-time at times to balance the workload.

Been working full-time since 2015 while going to school. Been through 3 family tragedies in the last 3 years which had an impact on my grades.

But the plus side is, they also played a role in shaping my mind to become a Lawyer. For the last couple of semesters I have been more motivated than ever to make something of myself and prove that my parents’ sacrifice of coming here in 2008 and leaving everything behind was worth it!

I have done some volunteer work, not alot as school and work wouldnt give me much time. But I’m open to do anything to get into good schools.

I have taken the practise LSAT tests and have scored between 162-167.

I am very new to the application process and am still trying to figure out even the type of law I want to practise and would love if someone could tell me what my chances are to get into schools like UofA, UofO, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, Dalhousie etc.

Also, please tell me how to make my application stronger as a candidate. Any advice will work!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say that your cGPA unfortunately makes your chances extremely slim to none for all of those schools as a regular applicant. This is based entirely on what I know about Canadian law school admissions as a recent applicant, for the record. 

The U of A probably has the most generous admissions policy of any of the schools that you listed, and even there, only 5/160 regular category admits had an L2 comparable to yours. All of those applicants had an LSAT equal to or higher than your highest practice score. So, I guess you have a shot there if you can score 95th+ percentile on the LSAT. 

Based on the limited biographical information you've shared, I do not think your life experiences would warrant an access application or offset your GPA in a dramatic way. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without knowing your B2, B3 or L2, it is difficult to give an accurate appraisal of your chances. As it stands, with even a 3.34 and a 162 it may be difficult to get into some of the schools you listed. A 167 may tilt things in your favour, but as a splitter you will have a significant uphill climb in the admissions process. Your best bet, other than delaying your application to get a higher GPA, is to see if your experiences qualify you as an access category applicant for those schools. I know Osgoode is very flexible in terms of what it considers to be a non-regular applicant, citing equity as well as disability as possible choices. Some schools give lower recommended scores to be considered competitive, some just look at your package holistically rather than giving your score priority. 

jan gave a very good analysis, though I still think you should look into each school's policy regarding access. The idea of access category is you are able to link something unusual (ie disabilities, extenuating circumstances, things that aren't related to anyone's life like the loss of a loved one etc etc) to your grades. That is, you want to demonstrate why these circumstances resulted in lower grades, and how you were able to cope and succeed despite them. Law schools want people who will succeed in law school first and foremost. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your GPA is unfortunately not competitive as it stands. The best way to make your application stronger is to work hard on upping your GPA to something more competitive. Get whatever help you need to get the grades you'll need, because maintaining your current performance won't get you into law school unless you rock it on the LSAT, and that is definitely not a guarantee.

That being said, your practice LSAT scores are looking fairly good. Definitely try to increase your score on that as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do your best on the LSAT and apply access.

Edit: When you say that your experiences have helped shape your mind to become a lawyer, I recommend that you try to tie your experiences into why you would be a good lawyer/law student rather than framing it as I need to get in in order to socially mobilize myself and vindicate my parents. The latter could lead you towards a shitty personal statement. But personal statement aside, I completely understand where you are coming from. 

 

Edited by Trew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

Hello Everyone,

I’m a 3rd year student at University of Lethbridge doing a Bachelors in Management. Major is Finance. I got 10 courses left in my degree.

my CGPA right now is 3.13. And with the trajectory of no distractions and no other things happening, I should end up with a CGPA of 3.2-3.3 or 3.3-3.4 in my last 20 courses.

I have been working to support myself and my family since I was 14. Taking school full-time and part-time at times to balance the workload.

Been working full-time since 2015 while going to school. Been through 3 family tragedies in the last 3 years which had an impact on my grades.

But the plus side is, they also played a role in shaping my mind to become a Lawyer. For the last couple of semesters I have been more motivated than ever to make something of myself and prove that my parents’ sacrifice of coming here in 2008 and leaving everything behind was worth it!

I have done some volunteer work, not alot as school and work wouldnt give me much time. But I’m open to do anything to get into good schools.

I have taken the practise LSAT tests and have scored between 162-167.

I am very new to the application process and am still trying to figure out even the type of law I want to practise and would love if someone could tell me what my chances are to get into schools like UofA, UofO, Osgoode, McGill, UBC, Dalhousie etc.

Also, please tell me how to make my application stronger as a candidate. Any advice will work!

 

 

This is unclear. Do you predict 3.2-3.4 as your GPA once you finish all your remaining courses or is that your predicted GPA just for those remaining courses? You haven't given us your B2/L2 so we can't predict your chances for B2 and L2 schools.

I do think you need to think more strategically though. You could get into a school like Lakehead or Windsor and then transfer to one of the schools you listed after 1st year. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would definitely say you should work as hard as you can to improve your GPA, if possible. However, a 3.13CGPA and a 3.25L2, while certainly not competitive, does not necessarily preclude you from any hope of getting into law school. With a 166 and a 3.09 (on 4.0 scale), I got into Dalhousie. Granted, it was fairly late cycle and after what I think was a very good interview. But there's definitely at least a chance. 

If you're open to other schools, here's my advice:

What you're going to want to do is apply early in the cycle to schools like the University of New Brunswick (UNB) and uVictoria, and possibly Manitoba. You can also try Windsor, but they are a toss-up school, so you never really know with them. 

The schools I mentioned (not Dal) have extremely generous GPA calculations, and will drop a chunk of your lowest grades in their admissions consideration. You'll want to apply to UNB especially as soon as possible once applications open up. Timing really does matter for them, and their early admissions are no joke. 

Study hard, and try to get that 167+. It will make an enormous difference versus a 162. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jan said:

 

The U of A probably has the most generous admissions policy of any of the schools that you listed, and even there, only 5/160 regular category admits had an L2 comparable to yours. All of those applicants had an LSAT equal to or higher than your highest practice score. So, I guess you have a shot there if you can score 95th+ percentile on the LSAT. 

 

Those stats for the admitted applicants who accepted their offers, not all accepted applicants. It's not like only 160 people were admitted lol. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, jan said:

I would say that your cGPA unfortunately makes your chances extremely slim to none for all of those schools as a regular applicant. This is based entirely on what I know about Canadian law school admissions as a recent applicant, for the record. 

The U of A probably has the most generous admissions policy of any of the schools that you listed, and even there, only 5/160 regular category admits had an L2 comparable to yours. All of those applicants had an LSAT equal to or higher than your highest practice score. So, I guess you have a shot there if you can score 95th+ percentile on the LSAT. 

Based on the limited biographical information you've shared, I do not think your life experiences would warrant an access application or offset your GPA in a dramatic way. 

I'm trying to understand what L2 and B3 mean. L2 = Last two years and B3 = Best three years?

If so, then for L2, I still have 10 courses left and therefore can't give an accurate answer on that yet. My prediction with the way things are going? is that my L2 GPA would be between 3.4 to 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale, all my scores are on a 4.0 scale). My B3 would probably be between 3.3 to 3.4 as I did my best in this last year of my degree and plan on continuing to do so.

This would put my CGPA to between 3.2 and 3.3. I understand that is low, but isn't a 167 score higher than normal, putting me in a somewhat competitive spot? What about schools like UofC or UofS or UVic or OttawaU? What are my chances like in those schools? Does it even really matter what kind of law school you go to so long as you secure article towards the end of your degree?

I'm open to other schools as well as any suggestions to improve my overall candidacy.

I want to understand what you meant by the "5/160 regular category admits" comment. Could you please elaborate?

What type of biographical information would be relevant? I came here in 08 from Pakistan. Home and family situation is very complicated and I'd rather not share it here but could you please tell what factors are relevant? What are not? What can I do to better my profile on that front?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, bhaywardio said:

Without knowing your B2, B3 or L2, it is difficult to give an accurate appraisal of your chances. As it stands, with even a 3.34 and a 162 it may be difficult to get into some of the schools you listed. A 167 may tilt things in your favour, but as a splitter you will have a significant uphill climb in the admissions process. Your best bet, other than delaying your application to get a higher GPA, is to see if your experiences qualify you as an access category applicant for those schools. I know Osgoode is very flexible in terms of what it considers to be a non-regular applicant, citing equity as well as disability as possible choices. Some schools give lower recommended scores to be considered competitive, some just look at your package holistically rather than giving your score priority. 

jan gave a very good analysis, though I still think you should look into each school's policy regarding access. The idea of access category is you are able to link something unusual (ie disabilities, extenuating circumstances, things that aren't related to anyone's life like the loss of a loved one etc etc) to your grades. That is, you want to demonstrate why these circumstances resulted in lower grades, and how you were able to cope and succeed despite them. Law schools want people who will succeed in law school first and foremost. 

Can you please tell me what B2, B3 or L2 means? As I mentioned, I'm VERY new to all of this. What I can tell you is that my prediction is that my GPA for my last two years or 20 courses would be between 3.4 to 3.5 according to my calculations. Extremely best case scenario might be 3.55.

I understand with a 3.34 and 162 it might be tough, but what other schools do you think I'd have a fair shot at? What do you mean by uphill battle in admissions process? What would that require? The schools I called around to get information gave me VERY basic information regarding average GPA and LSAT score requirements. What other phases are there for the application?

I don't mind delaying anything. I will be applying in 2019 to attend in sept 2020 and I will be done my last semester in April 2019 so I will have all of summer and fall semester to boost any mark I might need to boost.

What is an access category applicant? What does that require?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Xer said:

Your GPA is unfortunately not competitive as it stands. The best way to make your application stronger is to work hard on upping your GPA to something more competitive. Get whatever help you need to get the grades you'll need, because maintaining your current performance won't get you into law school unless you rock it on the LSAT, and that is definitely not a guarantee.

That being said, your practice LSAT scores are looking fairly good. Definitely try to increase your score on that as well.

I understand it might be as competitive where it stands. My goal is to have a CGPA of 3.3 or between 3.4 to 3.5 over my last two years. Would that make it competitive? If not, then do you advise a higher LSAT score would help? If so, what type of score? I am doing whatever I can to increase both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

This is unclear. Do you predict 3.2-3.4 as your GPA once you finish all your remaining courses or is that your predicted GPA just for those remaining courses? You haven't given us your B2/L2 so we can't predict your chances for B2 and L2 schools.

I do think you need to think more strategically though. You could get into a school like Lakehead or Windsor and then transfer to one of the schools you listed after 1st year. 

I'm sorry if its unclear. I'm sort of new to this whole thing and am trying to figure it out. The situation is my CURRENT CGPA is 3.13 (4.0 scale). I have 10 courses left. I predict that my CGPA will be between 3.2 to 3.3 and my GPA for my last 20 courses or last two years would be between 3.4 to 3.5.

Wow that is actually a great idea, transferring. Can you please guide me a bit more on that? How would one go about doing that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LegalArmada said:

I would definitely say you should work as hard as you can to improve your GPA, if possible. However, a 3.13CGPA and a 3.25L2, while certainly not competitive, does not necessarily preclude you from any hope of getting into law school. With a 166 and a 3.09 (on 4.0 scale), I got into Dalhousie. Granted, it was fairly late cycle and after what I think was a very good interview. But there's definitely at least a chance. 

If you're open to other schools, here's my advice:

What you're going to want to do is apply early in the cycle to schools like the University of New Brunswick (UNB) and uVictoria, and possibly Manitoba. You can also try Windsor, but they are a toss-up school, so you never really know with them. 

The schools I mentioned (not Dal) have extremely generous GPA calculations, and will drop a chunk of your lowest grades in their admissions consideration. You'll want to apply to UNB especially as soon as possible once applications open up. Timing really does matter for them, and their early admissions are no joke. 

Study hard, and try to get that 167+. It will make an enormous difference versus a 162. 

Wow this is probably the most reinforcing post I read so far haha. Yes I am working hard to make sure my last 10 remaining courses I knock it out of the park, and get my GPA over my last 20 courses or two years to be as high as 3.5. However, that would still put my CGPA at 3.29.

Wow that's amazing. Was that a 3.09 CGPA or 3.09 in your last two years? What do you mean by fairly late cycle? And that's good to hear about your interview. What did you do that worked so well?

I'm completely open to other schools, however I do ask you does it matter which school you attend for law? If so, how?

What is the reputation for UNB or Manitoba or UVic?

Thank you for your advice with the studying. I can't tell you how much that means!

Additional question: What is your view on schools outside of Canada?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

Those stats for the admitted applicants who accepted their offers, not all accepted applicants. It's not like only 160 people were admitted lol. 

What are your thoughts on schools outside of Canada? Like in the U.K. or U.S.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

What are your thoughts on schools outside of Canada? Like in the U.K. or U.S.?

The NCA process isn't worth it. Moreover, any US school which would accept you with a CGPA in your range most likely won't be a very good school. Even if money isn't an issue do you really want to spend so much on a degree which won't be respected?

 

22 minutes ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

 

Wow that is actually a great idea, transferring. Can you please guide me a bit more on that? How would one go about doing that?

All schools have information regarding transfers on their websites. 

Edited by NapoleonBonaparte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

tenor.gif

 

All schools have information regarding transfers on their websites. 

I can't see your gif so I can't tell lol. I'm assuming you're not pro international schools?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

I can't see your gif so I can't tell lol. I'm assuming you're not pro international schools?

I've edited my post. And no, I'm not against foreign schools. There are a lot of fantastic schools in the Anglosphere, but there are also a lot of disreputable ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, NapoleonBonaparte said:

@SiDtHeKiD If you can get a 3.5 L2/B2 and a mid 160s LSAT, you'll have a good chance at Queens, Western and Dal.

L2/B2 meaning last two or best two years, correct?

Edited by SiDtHeKiD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SiDtHeKiD said:

L2/B2 meaning last two or best two years, correct?

Oui. 

Queen's is B2. Western is L2. Dal is L2/CGPA, whichever is higher. I applied very widely and so I've memorised a lot of this stuff.

Edited by NapoleonBonaparte
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I was accepted by Western this cycle with with a 3.08 cGPA and a 3.65 L2 (and a 167 LSAT). Mind you, I also have 2 masters degrees and got an A- average in both (both were course-based). I think cGPA does matter, but they account for how long ago your undergrad was and what you've done since then, and whether you've proved that you could probably do better if you were given another chance (and ergo succeed in law school). 
    • Hi, are there any LLM applicants for the year 2021/2022 who received an admission e mail from Dalhousie? My application was completed on 31st March 2021 and waiting for a reply from the University. Just wondering whether any one of you guys have an update.    Thank you!!!
    • There are a lot of municipalities in Canada. City of Toronto hires a few articling students (most of their lawyers are former articling students and they rarely hire from outside though), along with Region of Peel, York Region, and some others I've seen. For federal government, there is only really the DOJ Legal Excellence Program. The municipalities also hire junior lawyers and I've seen quite a few postings in York Region and the surrounding areas. The process is a lot faster than the federal government which can take over a year from the time you apply. The federal government rarely hires junior lawyers outside of its articling students and federal court clerks. And you often see mid-level lawyers applying for LP-01 positions with the federal government and going through a written exam and interview processes just to end up in a waiting pool. I know people who applied in 2019 for the most recent DOJ LP-01 recruitment process and were put into a waiting pool which is scheduled to expire soon, after which point you have to apply all over again. So getting your foot in the door is a lot harder than it is for municipal and provincial. Certainly, getting into provincial is easier than municipal as there are a lot more legal positions available as well. 
    • Hey I'm a bit late here but I can give you my personal experience. It is quit the contrary of what your expectations seem to be. I did 3 years CEGEP and a 4 year Undergrad (just because I took my time). I spent some time managing a restaurant, then started a law certificate in the evening, then law school. I thought I would be disadvantaged because my background was so far away form the classic path to Biglaw. I will be 28 when graduating. I just did my Course aux stages and got 4 offers, while having a 3.65 GPA. First, they don't care about your age. If you have done anything productive in the past 10 years, it will be a great advantage to you in the interviews, because you might have more to say than anyone else. Find a way to highlight your maturity/leadership or whatever it is you have developed while others were in high school. I had a lot of misconceptions about a supposed prejudice towards older candidates, but I can assure you they don't really care. Get involved in whatever gets you going and be passionate about something. Good luck!

×
×
  • Create New...