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yolunda

Chance of international applicant to get a good scholarship

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I am interested in applying to Canadian law school. I have been researching for Canadian law school for a few weeks for my preparation.  I have some few questions and Thank you for your answer. 

1. As an international applicant, Will I have any chance to get a good scholarship from any certain law schools? 

2. What is the most generous law school?

3. Which cities have the least living expense?

 

 

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Great question, though I assume about 99% of the students on here will have no idea which law schools give the best scholarships for international students. 

As to cheapest city, I think your cost of living and tuition will be lowest in Fredericton, followed by Winnipeg, then it's a bit of a crap shoot for middle of the road, then you're going to start to get higher priced places like Vancouver, Toronto, Calgary, and Halifax. 

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You may (or may not) be eligible for scholarships. You also may find that bursaries (fee-reductions) have requirements like "Must have applied for student aid from home province" - you won't have one, and so might not be eligible to apply. In addition, international fees can be incredibly expensive. As an example of a cheaper city (for cost of living), Robson Hall in Winnipeg charge $10,300 a year for domestic students, but $25,300 for international students. That's nearly three times the price. Saskatchewan is $13,600/year for domestic students, but $37,200/year for international. Toronto is one of the most expensive to both live in, and pay tuition - $36,700 for domestic students, $51,400/annually for international students. They claim that as a consequence of that expense, they have the most generous student aid program of Canadian law schools, but the most relevant line for you (and indicative of why just 'the most generous law school' is at best a problematic question) is "Students who are not Canadian citizens or do not hold Canadian permanent residency status, and who enroll in the J.D. Program are not eligible to apply for the Faculty’s Financial Aid Program" (https://www.law.utoronto.ca/utfl_file/count/media/front_end_booklet_2018-2019_version2.0.pdf). 

The frivolous answers to your questions are (1) Maybe (2) One that says you can't use their generosity (3) Cities that people don't want to live in. But they're not really fair. It looks like what you're trying to get at is 'Where's the most financially viable place to do a 3 year degree?'. And that's a harder one all told. The unfortunate reality is that cheaper cities are typically cheaper because they're less desirable. Whether it's due to climate, or job potential, or location, there isn't unmatched demand pushing up prices. You'd need to think about whether you want to spend three years (and potentially the rest of your life) in eg Winnipeg, or Saskatoon, or Fredericton, or whether the increased cost of eg Vancouver, Victoria, Toronto would be worth it for the quality of life/job potential/access to other things. As an international student, any Canadian law school is likely to be horrifically expensive (McGill: $9,600 for non-Quebecois Canadians, $4,400 for Quebecois, and $42,300 for international), and you'd need to be able to prove you could pay your fees and living costs at the time you apply for a study permit (even if you do then qualify for a reduction in the fees on merit or need somehow).

The study permit brings up another issue: Would you have a plan for how to stay long-term, and use that very expensive degree? 

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First of all, posting your GPA and LSAT might be helpful, if you're comfortable with that. 

Canadian schools generally do not really have enormous scholarships. At most, you might get a fraction of your international tuition fee covered. I think the biggest non-renewable scholarship at my school is $10,500, whereas international student tuition is over $40,000 per year. Schools also aren't usually super transparent about their scholarship recipient selection process, though I would imagine that emailing schools you're interested in might be helpful.

Off the top of my head, Montreal might be the most affordable major Canadian city to live in. That said, McGill is going to jack up international student tuition starting next year, since the province recently deregulated those fees. 

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53 minutes ago, jan said:

Off the top of my head, Montreal might be the most affordable major Canadian city to live in. That said, McGill is going to jack up international student tuition starting next year, since the province recently deregulated those fees. 

Whoa really? Where did you hear This?

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37 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Whoa really? Where did you hear This?

The tuition thing? The deregulation was announced in May or so, and the Tribune and Daily both covered it. The Provost posted something a while ago that blatantly says that international student tuition will rise next year, albeit by an undetermined amount.

I'm betting that it'll be a pretty significant increase, just based on my own familiarity with the institution, and how lots of other Canadian universities treat international students as cash cows. 

I'm actually not sure if the new regulations apply to law programs (because IIRC, only arts, science, and education programs had their limits capped by the province, hence why commerce and engineering are so relatively pricey), or if they were already free reign. I wouldn't be surprised if rates jumped up regardless, though. 

Anyways, I digress. Point is that tuition rates could offset the affordability of the city. 

Edited by jan
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10 hours ago, jan said:

The tuition thing? The deregulation was announced in May or so, and the Tribune and Daily both covered it. The Provost posted something a while ago that blatantly says that international student tuition will rise next year, albeit by an undetermined amount.

I'm betting that it'll be a pretty significant increase, just based on my own familiarity with the institution, and how lots of other Canadian universities treat international students as cash cows. 

 

I'd be surprised if they go up by much - international fees at McGill are already comparable to the rest of Canada (compare to their v low tuition for especially Quebec residents). 2015, total fees for international were $37,000 a year, by 2018 this was up to $42,300. OK, they're 9k below Toronto (but who isn't) but they're in no way a cheap outlier on foreign student fees. *shrug* we'll see.

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I know that at Osgoode, many scholarships are restricted to Ontario residents so even other Canadians aren't eligible, let alone international students. However, in contrast to two schools mentioned above (U of T and McGill) Osgoode has near-identical tuition for domestic and international students, which is interesting.

Edited by NapoleonBonaparte

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14 hours ago, jan said:

First of all, posting your GPA and LSAT might be helpful, if you're comfortable with that. 

Canadian schools generally do not really have enormous scholarships. At most, you might get a fraction of your international tuition fee covered. I think the biggest non-renewable scholarship at my school is $10,500, whereas international student tuition is over $40,000 per year. Schools also aren't usually super transparent about their scholarship recipient selection process, though I would imagine that emailing schools you're interested in might be helpful.

Off the top of my head, Montreal might be the most affordable major Canadian city to live in. That said, McGill is going to jack up international student tuition starting next year, since the province recently deregulated those fees. 

Thank you for your advice! I am arising sophomore so i have not graduate yet. lol

 

Actually,I am a law student in Thailand which has a civil system. Completly different from Canada. I would also interested in LLM too and I can take some courses to meet NCA requirment. However, I am afraid that LLM won't be fascinating enough for employer. Or else, what are the prospects of LLM's employment?

 

 

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15 hours ago, lookingaround said:

You may (or may not) be eligible for scholarships. You also may find that bursaries (fee-reductions) have requirements like "Must have applied for student aid from home province" - you won't have one, and so might not be eligible to apply. In addition, international fees can be incredibly expensive. As an example of a cheaper city (for cost of living), Robson Hall in Winnipeg charge $10,300 a year for domestic students, but $25,300 for international students. That's nearly three times the price. Saskatchewan is $13,600/year for domestic students, but $37,200/year for international. Toronto is one of the most expensive to both live in, and pay tuition - $36,700 for domestic students, $51,400/annually for international students. They claim that as a consequence of that expense, they have the most generous student aid program of Canadian law schools, but the most relevant line for you (and indicative of why just 'the most generous law school' is at best a problematic question) is "Students who are not Canadian citizens or do not hold Canadian permanent residency status, and who enroll in the J.D. Program are not eligible to apply for the Faculty’s Financial Aid Program" (https://www.law.utoronto.ca/utfl_file/count/media/front_end_booklet_2018-2019_version2.0.pdf). 

The frivolous answers to your questions are (1) Maybe (2) One that says you can't use their generosity (3) Cities that people don't want to live in. But they're not really fair. It looks like what you're trying to get at is 'Where's the most financially viable place to do a 3 year degree?'. And that's a harder one all told. The unfortunate reality is that cheaper cities are typically cheaper because they're less desirable. Whether it's due to climate, or job potential, or location, there isn't unmatched demand pushing up prices. You'd need to think about whether you want to spend three years (and potentially the rest of your life) in eg Winnipeg, or Saskatoon, or Fredericton, or whether the increased cost of eg Vancouver, Victoria, Toronto would be worth it for the quality of life/job potential/access to other things. As an international student, any Canadian law school is likely to be horrifically expensive (McGill: $9,600 for non-Quebecois Canadians, $4,400 for Quebecois, and $42,300 for international), and you'd need to be able to prove you could pay your fees and living costs at the time you apply for a study permit (even if you do then qualify for a reduction in the fees on merit or need somehow).

The study permit brings up another issue: Would you have a plan for how to stay long-term, and use that very expensive degree? 

 

This is a very useful advice. Thank you so much. I am thinking of spending a long-term time in Canada. As you said about a less desire in some location, Does Going to a regional prestigious school increase a chance of local employment ? 

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14 minutes ago, yolunda said:

 

This is a very useful advice. Thank you so much. I am thinking of spending a long-term time in Canada. As you said about a less desire in some location, Does Going to a regional prestigious school increase a chance of local employment ? 

 

Yes, but beyond "I want to be in Canada long-term", do you have a plan for that? Do you have a plan for how to pay international tuition fees (to qualify for a study permit)? Do you have a plan for how to become a Permanent Resident? This may be tied to if/where you decide you want to go to school - some Provinces might sponsor graduates of their universities, whereas others wouldn't. There's little point in doing a law degree somewhere if you do not know starting it if and how you can qualify to stay there (with some exceptions - even if a person couldn't stay in eg England or the US, it's often a good idea to go to Yale, or Oxford if the chance arises). 

 

Canada doesn't really have "regional prestigious schools" in the same way the US does. Several Provinces only have a single school (some have none). As a general rule, it's less difficult to find work where you went to school, where you can more easily meet local practitioners, where your professors have connections and their names are known. 

 

Before you get excited about the idea of "maybe there are jobs in places people don't want to go", try sitting in a domestic freezer for a few hours, then remember much of Canada is twice as cold as that for half the year.

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